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The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Sebastian Evans, Evans
book is out-of-stock
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Sebastian Evans, Evans:
The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 1408631474, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781408631478

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: Kormendi Press, 296 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=17mm, Gew.=376gr, [GR: 27540 - TB/Volkskunde], [SW: - Sociology], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: THE HIGH HISTORY OF THE HOLY GRAAL - THIS High History saitli that T Gawain and Laneeiot wereth aret paMireedss itroe Etidviinl g. the court of King Arthur from the quest they had achieved. The Icing made great joy thereof and the Queen. Ring Arthur sate one day at meat by the side of the Queen, and they had been served of the first meats. Thereupon come two knights all armed, and each bore a dead knight before him, and the knights were still armed as they had been when their bodies were alive. Sir, say the knights, This shame and this mischief is yours. In like manner will you lose all your knights betimes and God love you not well enough to give counsel herein forthwith of His mercy. Lords, saith the King, How came these knights to be in so eviI case Sir, say they, g It is of good right you ought to know. The Knight of the Fiery Dragon is entered into the head of your land, and is destroying knights and castles and whatsoever he inay lay hands on, in such sort that none durst contend against him, for he is taller by a foot than any knight ever you had, and of grisly Knight of cheer, and so is his sword three times bigger than the sword of ever another knight, and his spear is well as heavy as a man may carry. Two knights might lightly cover them of his shield, and it hath on the outer side the head of a dragon that casteth forth fire and flame whensoever he will, so eager and biting that none may long endure his encounter. None other, how strong soever he be, may stand against him, and, even as you see, hath he burnt and evil-cntreated allother knights that have withstood him. From what land hat11 come such manner of man L Sir, say the knights, L He is come from the Giants castle, andhe warreth upon you for the love of Logrin the Giant, whose head Messire Ray brought you into your court, nor never, saith he, will he have joy until such time as he shall have avenged hinl on your body or upon the knight that you love best. Our Lord God, saith the Icing, will defend us from so evil a man. He is risen from the table, all scared, and maketh carry the two dead knights to be buried, and the others turn back again when they have told their message. The King calleth Messire Gawain and Lancelot and asketh them what he shall do of this knight that is entered into his land Uy my head, I know not what to say, save you give counsel herein. Sir, saith Lnncelot, We will go against him, so please ypu, 1 and Mcssire Gawain between us. By my head, saith the King, c I would not let you the Fiery go for a kingdom, for such man as is this is no Dragon knight but a devil and a fiend that hat11 issued from the borders of Hell. I say not but that it were great worship and prize td slay and conquer him, but he that should go against him should set his own life in right sore jeopardy and run great hazard of being in as bad plight as these two knights I have seen. The King was in such dismay that he knew not neither what to say nor to do, and so was all the court likewise in such sort as no knight neither one nor another was minded to go to battle with him, and so remained the court in great dismay. beginneth one of the master branchea fareth of the Graal in the name of the Father, forth and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Perceval had been with his mother as long as it pleased him. He hath departed with her good will and the good will of his sister, and telleth them he will return into theland as speedily as he may. He entereth into the great Lonely Forest, and rideth so far on his journeys that he cometh one day at the right hour of noon into a passing fair launde, and seeth a forest. He looketh amidst the launde and seeth a red cross... THE HIGH HISTORY OF THE HOLY GRAAL - THIS High History saitli that T Gawain and Laneeiot wereth aret paMireedss itroe Etidviinl g. the court of King Arthur from the quest they had achieved. The Icing made great joy thereof and the Queen. Ring Arthur sate one day at meat by the side of the Queen, and they had been served of the first meats. Thereupon come two knights all armed, and each bore a dead knight before him, and the knights were still armed as they had been when their bodies were alive. Sir, say the knights, This shame and this mischief is yours. In like manner will you lose all your knights betimes and God love you not well enough to give counsel herein forthwith of His mercy. Lords, saith the King, How came these knights to be in so eviI case Sir, say they, g It is of good right you ought to know. The Knight of the Fiery Dragon is entered into the head of your land, and is destroying knights and castles and whatsoever he inay lay hands on, in such sort that none durst contend against him, for he is taller by a foot than any knight ever you had, and of grisly Knight of cheer, and so is his sword three times bigger than the sword of ever another knight, and his spear is well as heavy as a man may carry. Two knights might lightly cover them of his shield, and it hath on the outer side the head of a dragon that casteth forth fire and flame whensoever he will, so eager and biting that none may long endure his encounter. None other, how strong soever he be, may stand against him, and, even as you see, hath he burnt and evil-cntreated allother knights that have withstood him. From what land hat11 come such manner of man L Sir, say the knights, L He is come from the Giants castle, andhe warreth upon you for the love of Logrin the Giant, whose head Messire Ray brought you into your court, nor never, saith he, will he have joy until such time as he shall have avenged hinl on your body or upon the knight that you love best. Our Lord God, saith the Icing, will defend us from so evil a man. He is risen from the table, all scared, and maketh carry the two dead knights to be buried, and the others turn back again when they have told their message. The King calleth Messire Gawain and Lancelot and asketh them what he shall do of this knight that is entered into his land Uy my head, I know not what to say, save you give counsel herein. Sir, saith Lnncelot, We will go against him, so please ypu, 1 and Mcssire Gawain between us. By my head, saith the King, c I would not let you the Fiery go for a kingdom, for such man as is this is no Dragon knight but a devil and a fiend that hat11 issued from the borders of Hell. I say not but that it were great worship and prize td slay and conquer him, but he that should go against him should set his own life in right sore jeopardy and run great hazard of being in as bad plight as these two knights I have seen. The King was in such dismay that he knew not neither what to say nor to do, and so was all the court likewise in such sort as no knight neither one nor another was minded to go to battle with him, and so remained the court in great dismay. beginneth one of the master branchea fareth of the Graal in the name of the Father, forth and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Perceval had been with his mother as long as it pleased him. He hath departed with her good will and the good will of his sister, and telleth them he will return into theland as speedily as he may. He entereth into the great Lonely Forest, and rideth so far on his journeys that he cometh one day at the right hour of noon into a passing fair launde, and seeth a forest. He looketh amidst the launde and seeth a red cross...

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The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Evans Sebastian Evans
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Evans Sebastian Evans:
The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Paperback

ISBN: 1408631474

ID: 1170681387

[EAN: 9781408631478], Neubuch, [PU: Kormendi Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2, Evans Sebastian Evans, THE HIGH HISTORY OF THE HOLY GRAAL - THIS High History saitli that T Gawain and Laneeiot wereth aret paMireedss itroe Etidviinl g. the court of King Arthur from the quest they had achieved. The Icing made great joy thereof and the Queen. Ring Arthur sate one day at meat by the side of the Queen, and they had been served of the first meats. Thereupon come two knights all armed, and each bore a dead knight before him, and the knights were still armed as they had been when their bodies were alive. Sir, say the knights, This shame and this mischief is yours. In like manner will you lose all your knights betimes and God love you not well enough to give counsel herein forthwith of His mercy. Lords, saith the King, How came these knights to be in so eviI case Sir, say they, g It is of good right you ought to know. The Knight of the Fiery Dragon is entered into the head of your land, and is destroying knights and castles and whatsoever he inay lay hands on, in such sort that none durst contend against him, for he is taller by a foot than any knight ever you had, and of grisly Knight of cheer, and so is his sword three times bigger than the sword of ever another knight, and his spear is well as heavy as a man may carry. Two knights might lightly cover them of his shield, and it hath on the outer side the head of a dragon that casteth forth fire and flame whensoever he will, so eager and biting that none may long endure his encounter. None other, how strong soever he be, may stand against him, and, even as you see, hath he burnt and evil-cntreated allother knights that have withstood him. From what land hat11 come such manner of man L Sir, say the knights, L He is come from the Giants castle, andhe warreth upon you for the love of Logrin the Giant, whose head Messire Ray brought you into your court, nor never, saith he, will he have joy until such time as he shall have avenged hinl on your body or upon the knight that you love best. Our Lord God, saith the Icing, will defend us from so evil a man. He is risen from the table, all scared, and maketh carry the two dead knights to be buried, and the others turn back again when they have told their message. The King calleth Messire Gawain and Lancelot and asketh them what he shall do of this knight that is entered into his land Uy my head, I know not what to say, save you give counsel herein. Sir, saith Lnncelot, We will go against him, so please ypu, 1 and Mcssire Gawain between us. By my head, saith the King, c I would not let you the Fiery go for a kingdom, for such man as is this is no Dragon knight but a devil and a fiend that hat11 issued from the borders of Hell. I say not but that it were great worship and prize td slay and conquer him, but he that should go against him should set his own life in right sore jeopardy and run great hazard of being in as bad plight as these two knights I have seen. The King was in such dismay that he knew not neither what to say nor to do, and so was all the court likewise in such sort as no knight neither one nor another was minded to go to battle with him, and so remained the court in great dismay. beginneth one of the master branchea fareth of the Graal in the name of the Father, forth and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Perceval had been with his mother as long as it pleased him. He hath departed with her good will and the good will of his sister, and telleth them he will return into theland as speedily as he may. He entereth into the great Lonely Forest, and rideth so far on his journeys that he cometh one day at the right hour of noon into a passing fair launde, and seeth a forest. He looketh amidst the launde and seeth a red cross.

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THE High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 (Paperback) - Sebastian Evans
book is out-of-stock
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Sebastian Evans:
THE High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 (Paperback) - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 1408631474

ID: 2691058595

[EAN: 9781408631478], Neubuch, [PU: Read Books, United Kingdom], Brand New Book with Free Worldwide Delivery ***** Print on Demand *****. THE HIGH HISTORY OF THE HOLY GRAAL - THIS High History saitli that T Gawain and Laneeiot wereth aret paMireedss itroe Etidviinl g. the court of King Arthur from the quest they had achieved. The Icing made great joy thereof and the Queen. Ring Arthur sate one day at meat by the side of the Queen, and they had been served of the first meats. Thereupon come two knights all armed, and each bore a dead knight before him, and the knights were still armed as they had been when their bodies were alive. Sir, say the knights, This shame and this mischief is yours. In like manner will you lose all your knights betimes and God love you not well enough to give counsel herein forthwith of His mercy. Lords, saith the King, How came these knights to be in so eviI case Sir, say they, g It is of good right you ought to know. The Knight of the Fiery Dragon is entered into the head of your land, and is destroying knights and castles and whatsoever he inay lay hands on, in such sort that none durst contend against him, for he is taller by a foot than any knight ever you had, and of grisly Knight of cheer, and so is his sword three times bigger than the sword of ever another knight, and his spear is well as heavy as a man may carry. Two knights might lightly cover them of his shield, and it hath on the outer side the head of a dragon that casteth forth fire and flame whensoever he will, so eager and biting that none may long endure his encounter. None other, how strong soever he be, may stand against him, and, even as you see, hath he burnt and evil-cntreated allother knights that have withstood him. From what land hat11 come such manner of man L Sir, say the knights, L He is come from the Giants castle, andhe warreth upon you for the love of Logrin the Giant, whose head Messire Ray brought you into your court, nor never, saith he, will he have joy until such time as he shall have avenged hinl on your body or upon the knight that you love best. Our Lord God, saith the Icing, will defend us from so evil a man. He is risen from the table, all scared, and maketh carry the two dead knights to be buried, and the others turn back again when they have told their message. The King calleth Messire Gawain and Lancelot and asketh them what he shall do of this knight that is entered into his land Uy my head, I know not what to say, save you give counsel herein. Sir, saith Lnncelot, We will go against him, so please ypu, 1 and Mcssire Gawain between us. By my head, saith the King, c I would not let you the Fiery go for a kingdom, for such man as is this is no Dragon knight but a devil and a fiend that hat11 issued from the borders of Hell. I say not but that it were great worship and prize td slay and conquer him, but he that should go against him should set his own life in right sore jeopardy and run great hazard of being in as bad plight as these two knights I have seen. The King was in such dismay that he knew not neither what to say nor to do, and so was all the court likewise in such sort as no knight neither one nor another was minded to go to battle with him, and so remained the court in great dismay. beginneth one of the master branchea fareth of the Graal in the name of the Father, forth and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Perceval had been with his mother as long as it pleased him. He hath departed with her good will and the good will of his sister, and telleth them he will return into theland as speedily as he may. He entereth into the great Lonely Forest, and rideth so far on his journeys that he cometh one day at the right hour of noon into a passing fair launde, and seeth a forest. He looketh amidst the launde and seeth a red cross.

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The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Sebastian Evans, Evans
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Sebastian Evans, Evans:
The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Paperback

ISBN: 9781408631478

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: Kormendi Press], THE HIGH HISTORY OF THE HOLY GRAAL - THIS High History saitli that T Gawain and Laneeiot wereth aret paMireedss itroe Etidviinl g. the court of King Arthur from the quest they had achieved. The Icing made great joy thereof and the Queen. Ring Arthur sate one day at meat by the side of the Queen, and they had been served of the first meats. Thereupon come two knights all armed, and each bore a dead knight before him, and the knights were still armed as they had been when their bodies were alive. Sir, say the knights, This shame and this mischief is yours. In like manner will you lose all your knights betimes and God love you not well enough to give counsel herein forthwith of His mercy. Lords, saith the King, How came these knights to be in so eviI case Sir, say they, g It is of good right you ought to know. The Knight of the Fiery Dragon is entered into the head of your land, and is destroying knights and castles and whatsoever he inay lay hands on, in such sort that none durst contend against him, for he is taller by a foot than any knight ever you had, and of grisly Knight of cheer, and so is his sword three times bigger than the sword of ever another knight, and his spear is well as heavy as a man may carry. Two knights might lightly cover them of his shield, and it hath on the outer side the head of a dragon that casteth forth fire and flame whensoever he will, so eager and biting that none may long endure his encounter. None other, how strong soever he be, may stand against him, and, even as you see, hath he burnt and evil-cntreated allother knights that have withstood him. From what land hat11 come such manner of man L Sir, say the knights, L He is come from the Giants castle, andhe warreth upon you for the love of Logrin the Giant, whose head Messire Ray brought you into your court, nor never, saith he, will he have joy until such time as he shall have avenged hinl on your body or upon the knight that you love best. Our Lord God, saith the Icing, will defend us from so evil a man. He is risen from the table, all scared, and maketh carry the two dead knights to be buried, and the others turn back again when they have told their message. The King calleth Messire Gawain and Lancelot and asketh them what he shall do of this knight that is entered into his land Uy my head, I know not what to say, save you give counsel herein. Sir, saith Lnncelot, We will go against him, so please ypu, 1 and Mcssire Gawain between us. By my head, saith the King, c I would not let you the Fiery go for a kingdom, for such man as is this is no Dragon knight but a devil and a fiend that hat11 issued from the borders of Hell. I say not but that it were great worship and prize td slay and conquer him, but he that should go against him should set his own life in right sore jeopardy and run great hazard of being in as bad plight as these two knights I have seen. The King was in such dismay that he knew not neither what to say nor to do, and so was all the court likewise in such sort as no knight neither one nor another was minded to go to battle with him, and so remained the court in great dismay. beginneth one of the master branchea fareth of the Graal in the name of the Father, forth and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Perceval had been with his mother as long as it pleased him. He hath departed with her good will and the good will of his sister, and telleth them he will return into theland as speedily as he may. He entereth into the great Lonely Forest, and rideth so far on his journeys that he cometh one day at the right hour of noon into a passing fair launde, and seeth a forest. He looketh amidst the launde and seeth a red cross...Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

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High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - SEBASTIAN EVANS
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SEBASTIAN EVANS:
High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2 - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 9781408631478

ID: 8882178

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The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2

THE HIGH HISTORY OF THE HOLY GRAAL - THIS High History saitli that T Gawain and Laneeiot wereth aret paMireedss itroe Etidviinl g. the court of King Arthur from the quest they had achieved. The Icing made great joy thereof and the Queen. Ring Arthur sate one day at meat by the side of the Queen, and they had been served of the first meats. Thereupon come two knights all armed, and each bore a dead knight before him, and the knights were still armed as they had been when their bodies were alive. Sir, say the knights, This shame and this mischief is yours. In like manner will you lose all your knights betimes and God love you not well enough to give counsel herein forthwith of His mercy. Lords, saith the King, How came these knights to be in so eviI case Sir, say they, g It is of good right you ought to know. The Knight of the Fiery Dragon is entered into the head of your land, and is destroying knights and castles and whatsoever he inay lay hands on, in such sort that none durst contend against him, for he is taller by a foot than any knight ever you had, and of grisly Knight of cheer, and so is his sword three times bigger than the sword of ever another knight, and his spear is well as heavy as a man may carry. Two knights might lightly cover them of his shield, and it hath on the outer side the head of a dragon that casteth forth fire and flame whensoever he will, so eager and biting that none may long endure his encounter. None other, how strong soever he be, may stand against him, and, even as you see, hath he burnt and evil-cntreated allother knights that have withstood him. From what land hat11 come such manner of man L Sir, say the knights, L He is come from the Giants castle, andhe warreth upon you for the love of Logrin the Giant, whose head Messire Ray brought you into your court, nor never, saith he, will he have joy until such time as he shall have avenged hinl on your body or upon the knight that you love best. Our Lord God, saith the Icing, will defend us from so evil a man. He is risen from the table, all scared, and maketh carry the two dead knights to be buried, and the others turn back again when they have told their message. The King calleth Messire Gawain and Lancelot and asketh them what he shall do of this knight that is entered into his land Uy my head, I know not what to say, save you give counsel herein. Sir, saith Lnncelot, We will go against him, so please ypu, 1 and Mcssire Gawain between us. By my head, saith the King, c I would not let you the Fiery go for a kingdom, for such man as is this is no Dragon knight but a devil and a fiend that hat11 issued from the borders of Hell. I say not but that it were great worship and prize td slay and conquer him, but he that should go against him should set his own life in right sore jeopardy and run great hazard of being in as bad plight as these two knights I have seen. The King was in such dismay that he knew not neither what to say nor to do, and so was all the court likewise in such sort as no knight neither one nor another was minded to go to battle with him, and so remained the court in great dismay. beginneth one of the master branchea fareth of the Graal in the name of the Father, forth and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Perceval had been with his mother as long as it pleased him. He hath departed with her good will and the good will of his sister, and telleth them he will return into theland as speedily as he may. He entereth into the great Lonely Forest, and rideth so far on his journeys that he cometh one day at the right hour of noon into a passing fair launde, and seeth a forest. He looketh amidst the launde and seeth a red cross...

Details of the book - The High History of the Holy Graal Translated from the French by Sebastian Evans - Volume 2


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781408631478
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1408631474
Paperback
Publishing year: 2007
Publisher: Kormendi Press
296 Pages
Weight: 0,376 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 06.07.2008 22:46:35
Book found last time on 17.07.2015 15:45:09
ISBN/EAN: 9781408631478

ISBN - alternate spelling:
1-4086-3147-4, 978-1-4086-3147-8


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