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The State and Charity - MacKay, Thomas
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MacKay, Thomas:
The State and Charity - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 140677152X, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406771527

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 212 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=12mm, Gew.=272gr, [GR: 25500 - TB/Geschichte], [SW: - History - General History], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: THE STATE AND CHAEITY BY THOMAS MACKAY iLoutron MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK THE MACMiLLAN COMPANY 1898 A II rights reserved PEEFACE THE relation of the State to Charity might seem a subject calculated to exclude any appeal to first principles. The Author has not found it so, and his apology for the course taken has been relegated, as an after thought, to the Preface. Charity, whether we regard it as a Christian virtue, or as the voluntary benevolent act, or as the compulsory benevolent act which is not charity, but the Poor Law, or again as a tenure of property specially recognised by English law, touches everywhere on fundamental principles of human society. A first chapter is accordingly devoted to a considera tion of the place which Charity occupies in our social economy. Its early history in this country is then sketched in broad outline. The disintegration, under the criticism of eighteenth century scepticism, of our primitive unquestioning faith in-thtfntferit of charitable don anon is then described. The influence of this doubt is next traced through the public inquiry instituted by Lord Brougham, and through the legislation subse quently enacted for the control of charitable foundations. Here, as elsewhere, public opinion, after passing through a stage in which the maxim was, Loose him and let VI PREFACE him go, seems at the present day to have reached a period of reaction. Public charity and, still more, public compulsory charity seem to have passed from under the cloud of censure and depreciation. The destructive criticism of Turgot and his successors has shaken to its base the cult of the pious founder. The present generation is building a new edifice on ideals of itsown. Is the foundation sound, or is the reconstruc tion by the new democracy but the writing large of the yoke of the dead hand The controversy is not soluble to-day. At this point the narrative pauses, and, in Chapters VIII. and IX., an attempt is made to exhibit, so to speak, a section of the sphere of action covered by the charitable instincts of mankind. As a practical man, the English citizen must realise that in this country there exist, side by side, legal and voluntary agencies for relief, and he is called on to regulate this co-ordinate jurisdiction in the light of sound theory and experience. Apart from the statement of fact contained in these two chapters, it has been the object of the Author to set out rather than decide the issues of a controversy which branches out into almost every phase of human activity. Judgment cannot be passed by this genera tion on constructive experiments which it has itself devised if the Author has succeeded in suggesting the points on which the verdict must turn, he has realised the limit of his ambition. CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY .... CHAPTER 11 EARLY HISTORY . . . . .17 CHAPTER III TURGOT AND THE ECONOMISTS . . .29 CHAPTER IV THE STAGE OP INQUIRY . . . .54 CHAPTER V THE EFFECT OF THE INQUIRY ON PUBLIC OPINION. 71 CHAPTER VI THE LAW OF CHARITABLE TRUSTS . . .92 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER VII SOME ADDITIONAL DUTIES OP THE CHARITY COM MISSIONERS . . . . .109 CHAPTER VIII THE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN LEGAL AND VOLUNTARY AGENCIES OF RELIEF . . . .134 CHAPTER IX MEDICAL RELIEF AND HOSPITAL REFORM . .178 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE term charity has two meanings which at the out set it may be convenient to distinguish. It means, on the one hand, theChristian virtue as described in the never-to-be-forgotten language of the apostle in his Epistle to the Corinthians. It means, on the other hand, a certain abnormal economic method for distributing the good things of this world. It is abnormal in contra distinction to the normal economic methods of distribu tion, which are exchange, bequest, inheritance, and gift in so far as this last proceeds spontaneously from the social ties of family and friendship... THE STATE AND CHAEITY BY THOMAS MACKAY iLoutron MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK THE MACMiLLAN COMPANY 1898 A II rights reserved PEEFACE THE relation of the State to Charity might seem a subject calculated to exclude any appeal to first principles. The Author has not found it so, and his apology for the course taken has been relegated, as an after thought, to the Preface. Charity, whether we regard it as a Christian virtue, or as the voluntary benevolent act, or as the compulsory benevolent act which is not charity, but the Poor Law, or again as a tenure of property specially recognised by English law, touches everywhere on fundamental principles of human society. A first chapter is accordingly devoted to a considera tion of the place which Charity occupies in our social economy. Its early history in this country is then sketched in broad outline. The disintegration, under the criticism of eighteenth century scepticism, of our primitive unquestioning faith in-thtfntferit of charitable don anon is then described. The influence of this doubt is next traced through the public inquiry instituted by Lord Brougham, and through the legislation subse quently enacted for the control of charitable foundations. Here, as elsewhere, public opinion, after passing through a stage in which the maxim was, Loose him and let VI PREFACE him go, seems at the present day to have reached a period of reaction. Public charity and, still more, public compulsory charity seem to have passed from under the cloud of censure and depreciation. The destructive criticism of Turgot and his successors has shaken to its base the cult of the pious founder. The present generation is building a new edifice on ideals of itsown. Is the foundation sound, or is the reconstruc tion by the new democracy but the writing large of the yoke of the dead hand The controversy is not soluble to-day. At this point the narrative pauses, and, in Chapters VIII. and IX., an attempt is made to exhibit, so to speak, a section of the sphere of action covered by the charitable instincts of mankind. As a practical man, the English citizen must realise that in this country there exist, side by side, legal and voluntary agencies for relief, and he is called on to regulate this co-ordinate jurisdiction in the light of sound theory and experience. Apart from the statement of fact contained in these two chapters, it has been the object of the Author to set out rather than decide the issues of a controversy which branches out into almost every phase of human activity. Judgment cannot be passed by this genera tion on constructive experiments which it has itself devised if the Author has succeeded in suggesting the points on which the verdict must turn, he has realised the limit of his ambition. CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY .... CHAPTER 11 EARLY HISTORY . . . . .17 CHAPTER III TURGOT AND THE ECONOMISTS . . .29 CHAPTER IV THE STAGE OP INQUIRY . . . .54 CHAPTER V THE EFFECT OF THE INQUIRY ON PUBLIC OPINION. 71 CHAPTER VI THE LAW OF CHARITABLE TRUSTS . . .92 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER VII SOME ADDITIONAL DUTIES OP THE CHARITY COM MISSIONERS . . . . .109 CHAPTER VIII THE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN LEGAL AND VOLUNTARY AGENCIES OF RELIEF . . . .134 CHAPTER IX MEDICAL RELIEF AND HOSPITAL REFORM . .178 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE term charity has two meanings which at the out set it may be convenient to distinguish. It means, on the one hand, theChristian virtue as described in the never-to-be-forgotten language of the apostle in his Epistle to the Corinthians. It means, on the other hand, a certain abnormal economic method for distributing the good things of this world. It is abnormal in contra distinction to the normal economic methods of distribu tion, which are exchange, bequest, inheritance, and gift in so far as this last proceeds spontaneously from the social ties of family and friendship...

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The State And Charity (Paperback) - Thomas MacKay
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Thomas MacKay:
The State And Charity (Paperback) - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 140677152X

ID: 2691411714

[EAN: 9781406771527], Neubuch, [PU: Read Books, United Kingdom], Brand New Book with Free Worldwide Delivery ***** Print on Demand *****. THE STATE AND CHAEITY BY THOMAS MACKAY iLoutron MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK THE MACMiLLAN COMPANY 1898 A II rights reserved PEEFACE THE relation of the State to Charity might seem a subject calculated to exclude any appeal to first principles. The Author has not found it so, and his apology for the course taken has been relegated, as an after thought, to the Preface. Charity, whether we regard it as a Christian virtue, or as the voluntary benevolent act, or as the compulsory benevolent act which is not charity, but the Poor Law, or again as a tenure of property specially recognised by English law, touches everywhere on fundamental principles of human society. A first chapter is accordingly devoted to a considera tion of the place which Charity occupies in our social economy. Its early history in this country is then sketched in broad outline. The disintegration, under the criticism of eighteenth century scepticism, of our primitive unquestioning faith in-thtfntferit of charitable don anon is then described. The influence of this doubt is next traced through the public inquiry instituted by Lord Brougham, and through the legislation subse quently enacted for the control of charitable foundations. Here, as elsewhere, public opinion, after passing through a stage in which the maxim was, Loose him and let VI PREFACE him go, seems at the present day to have reached a period of reaction. Public charity and, still more, public compulsory charity seem to have passed from under the cloud of censure and depreciation. The destructive criticism of Turgot and his successors has shaken to its base the cult of the pious founder. The present generation is building a new edifice on ideals of itsown. Is the foundation sound, or is the reconstruc tion by the new democracy but the writing large of the yoke of the dead hand The controversy is not soluble to-day. At this point the narrative pauses, and, in Chapters VIII. and IX., an attempt is made to exhibit, so to speak, a section of the sphere of action covered by the charitable instincts of mankind. As a practical man, the English citizen must realise that in this country there exist, side by side, legal and voluntary agencies for relief, and he is called on to regulate this co-ordinate jurisdiction in the light of sound theory and experience. Apart from the statement of fact contained in these two chapters, it has been the object of the Author to set out rather than decide the issues of a controversy which branches out into almost every phase of human activity. Judgment cannot be passed by this genera tion on constructive experiments which it has itself devised if the Author has succeeded in suggesting the points on which the verdict must turn, he has realised the limit of his ambition. CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY . CHAPTER 11 EARLY HISTORY . . . . .17 CHAPTER III TURGOT AND THE ECONOMISTS . . .29 CHAPTER IV THE STAGE OP INQUIRY . . . .54 CHAPTER V THE EFFECT OF THE INQUIRY ON PUBLIC OPINION. 71 CHAPTER VI THE LAW OF CHARITABLE TRUSTS . . .92 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER VII SOME ADDITIONAL DUTIES OP THE CHARITY COM MISSIONERS . . . . .109 CHAPTER VIII THE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN LEGAL AND VOLUNTARY AGENCIES OF RELIEF . . . .134 CHAPTER IX MEDICAL RELIEF AND HOSPITAL REFORM . .178 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE term charity has two meanings which at the out set it may be convenient to distinguish. It means, on the one hand, theChristian virtue as described in the never-to-be-forgotten language of the apostle in his Epistle to the Corinthians. It means, on the other hand, a certain abnormal economic method for distributing the good things of this world. It is abnormal in contra distinction to the normal economic methods of distribu tion, which are exchange, bequest, inheritance, and gift in so far as this last proceeds spontaneously from the social ties of family and friendship.

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The State and Charity - Thomas MacKay
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Thomas MacKay:
The State and Charity - Paperback

ISBN: 140677152X

ID: 1170673310

[EAN: 9781406771527], Neubuch, [PU: Foley Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., The State and Charity, Thomas MacKay, THE STATE AND CHAEITY BY THOMAS MACKAY iLoutron MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK THE MACMiLLAN COMPANY 1898 A II rights reserved PEEFACE THE relation of the State to Charity might seem a subject calculated to exclude any appeal to first principles. The Author has not found it so, and his apology for the course taken has been relegated, as an after thought, to the Preface. Charity, whether we regard it as a Christian virtue, or as the voluntary benevolent act, or as the compulsory benevolent act which is not charity, but the Poor Law, or again as a tenure of property specially recognised by English law, touches everywhere on fundamental principles of human society. A first chapter is accordingly devoted to a considera tion of the place which Charity occupies in our social economy. Its early history in this country is then sketched in broad outline. The disintegration, under the criticism of eighteenth century scepticism, of our primitive unquestioning faith in-thtfntferit of charitable don anon is then described. The influence of this doubt is next traced through the public inquiry instituted by Lord Brougham, and through the legislation subse quently enacted for the control of charitable foundations. Here, as elsewhere, public opinion, after passing through a stage in which the maxim was, Loose him and let VI PREFACE him go, seems at the present day to have reached a period of reaction. Public charity and, still more, public compulsory charity seem to have passed from under the cloud of censure and depreciation. The destructive criticism of Turgot and his successors has shaken to its base the cult of the pious founder. The present generation is building a new edifice on ideals of itsown. Is the foundation sound, or is the reconstruc tion by the new democracy but the writing large of the yoke of the dead hand The controversy is not soluble to-day. At this point the narrative pauses, and, in Chapters VIII. and IX., an attempt is made to exhibit, so to speak, a section of the sphere of action covered by the charitable instincts of mankind. As a practical man, the English citizen must realise that in this country there exist, side by side, legal and voluntary agencies for relief, and he is called on to regulate this co-ordinate jurisdiction in the light of sound theory and experience. Apart from the statement of fact contained in these two chapters, it has been the object of the Author to set out rather than decide the issues of a controversy which branches out into almost every phase of human activity. Judgment cannot be passed by this genera tion on constructive experiments which it has itself devised if the Author has succeeded in suggesting the points on which the verdict must turn, he has realised the limit of his ambition. CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY . CHAPTER 11 EARLY HISTORY . . . . .17 CHAPTER III TURGOT AND THE ECONOMISTS . . .29 CHAPTER IV THE STAGE OP INQUIRY . . . .54 CHAPTER V THE EFFECT OF THE INQUIRY ON PUBLIC OPINION. 71 CHAPTER VI THE LAW OF CHARITABLE TRUSTS . . .92 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER VII SOME ADDITIONAL DUTIES OP THE CHARITY COM MISSIONERS . . . . .109 CHAPTER VIII THE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN LEGAL AND VOLUNTARY AGENCIES OF RELIEF . . . .134 CHAPTER IX MEDICAL RELIEF AND HOSPITAL REFORM . .178 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE term charity has two meanings which at the out set it may be convenient to distinguish. It means, on the one hand, theChristian virtue as described in the never-to-be-forgotten language of the apostle in his Epistle to the Corinthians. It means, on the other hand, a certain abnormal economic method for distributing the good things of this world. It is abnormal in contra distinction to the normal economic methods of distribu tion, which are exchange, bequest, inheritance, and gift in so far as this last proceeds spontaneously from the social ties of family and friendship.

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The State and Charity - Thomas MacKay
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Thomas MacKay:
The State and Charity - Paperback

1898, ISBN: 140677152X

ID: 1170673310

[EAN: 9781406771527], Neubuch, [PU: Foley Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., The State and Charity, Thomas MacKay, THE STATE AND CHAEITY BY THOMAS MACKAY iLoutron MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK THE MACMiLLAN COMPANY 1898 A II rights reserved PEEFACE THE relation of the State to Charity might seem a subject calculated to exclude any appeal to first principles. The Author has not found it so, and his apology for the course taken has been relegated, as an after thought, to the Preface. Charity, whether we regard it as a Christian virtue, or as the voluntary benevolent act, or as the compulsory benevolent act which is not charity, but the Poor Law, or again as a tenure of property specially recognised by English law, touches everywhere on fundamental principles of human society. A first chapter is accordingly devoted to a considera tion of the place which Charity occupies in our social economy. Its early history in this country is then sketched in broad outline. The disintegration, under the criticism of eighteenth century scepticism, of our primitive unquestioning faith in-thtfntferit of charitable don anon is then described. The influence of this doubt is next traced through the public inquiry instituted by Lord Brougham, and through the legislation subse quently enacted for the control of charitable foundations. Here, as elsewhere, public opinion, after passing through a stage in which the maxim was, Loose him and let VI PREFACE him go, seems at the present day to have reached a period of reaction. Public charity and, still more, public compulsory charity seem to have passed from under the cloud of censure and depreciation. The destructive criticism of Turgot and his successors has shaken to its base the cult of the pious founder. The present generation is building a new edifice on ideals of itsown. Is the foundation sound, or is the reconstruc tion by the new democracy but the writing large of the yoke of the dead hand The controversy is not soluble to-day. At this point the narrative pauses, and, in Chapters VIII. and IX., an attempt is made to exhibit, so to speak, a section of the sphere of action covered by the charitable instincts of mankind. As a practical man, the English citizen must realise that in this country there exist, side by side, legal and voluntary agencies for relief, and he is called on to regulate this co-ordinate jurisdiction in the light of sound theory and experience. Apart from the statement of fact contained in these two chapters, it has been the object of the Author to set out rather than decide the issues of a controversy which branches out into almost every phase of human activity. Judgment cannot be passed by this genera tion on constructive experiments which it has itself devised if the Author has succeeded in suggesting the points on which the verdict must turn, he has realised the limit of his ambition. CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY . CHAPTER 11 EARLY HISTORY . . . . .17 CHAPTER III TURGOT AND THE ECONOMISTS . . .29 CHAPTER IV THE STAGE OP INQUIRY . . . .54 CHAPTER V THE EFFECT OF THE INQUIRY ON PUBLIC OPINION. 71 CHAPTER VI THE LAW OF CHARITABLE TRUSTS . . .92 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER VII SOME ADDITIONAL DUTIES OP THE CHARITY COM MISSIONERS . . . . .109 CHAPTER VIII THE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN LEGAL AND VOLUNTARY AGENCIES OF RELIEF . . . .134 CHAPTER IX MEDICAL RELIEF AND HOSPITAL REFORM . .178 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE term charity has two meanings which at the out set it may be convenient to distinguish. It means, on the one hand, theChristian virtue as described in the never-to-be-forgotten language of the apostle in his Epistle to the Corinthians. It means, on the other hand, a certain abnormal economic method for distributing the good things of this world. It is abnormal in contra distinction to the normal economic methods of distribu tion, which are exchange, bequest, inheritance, and gift in so far as this last proceeds spontaneously from the social ties of family and friendship.

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Details of the book
The State and Charity

THE STATE AND CHAEITY BY THOMAS MACKAY iLoutron MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK THE MACMiLLAN COMPANY 1898 A II rights reserved PEEFACE THE relation of the State to Charity might seem a subject calculated to exclude any appeal to first principles. The Author has not found it so, and his apology for the course taken has been relegated, as an after thought, to the Preface. Charity, whether we regard it as a Christian virtue, or as the voluntary benevolent act, or as the compulsory benevolent act which is not charity, but the Poor Law, or again as a tenure of property specially recognised by English law, touches everywhere on fundamental principles of human society. A first chapter is accordingly devoted to a considera tion of the place which Charity occupies in our social economy. Its early history in this country is then sketched in broad outline. The disintegration, under the criticism of eighteenth century scepticism, of our primitive unquestioning faith in-thtfntferit of charitable don anon is then described. The influence of this doubt is next traced through the public inquiry instituted by Lord Brougham, and through the legislation subse quently enacted for the control of charitable foundations. Here, as elsewhere, public opinion, after passing through a stage in which the maxim was, Loose him and let VI PREFACE him go, seems at the present day to have reached a period of reaction. Public charity and, still more, public compulsory charity seem to have passed from under the cloud of censure and depreciation. The destructive criticism of Turgot and his successors has shaken to its base the cult of the pious founder. The present generation is building a new edifice on ideals of itsown. Is the foundation sound, or is the reconstruc tion by the new democracy but the writing large of the yoke of the dead hand The controversy is not soluble to-day. At this point the narrative pauses, and, in Chapters VIII. and IX., an attempt is made to exhibit, so to speak, a section of the sphere of action covered by the charitable instincts of mankind. As a practical man, the English citizen must realise that in this country there exist, side by side, legal and voluntary agencies for relief, and he is called on to regulate this co-ordinate jurisdiction in the light of sound theory and experience. Apart from the statement of fact contained in these two chapters, it has been the object of the Author to set out rather than decide the issues of a controversy which branches out into almost every phase of human activity. Judgment cannot be passed by this genera tion on constructive experiments which it has itself devised if the Author has succeeded in suggesting the points on which the verdict must turn, he has realised the limit of his ambition. CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY .... CHAPTER 11 EARLY HISTORY . . . . .17 CHAPTER III TURGOT AND THE ECONOMISTS . . .29 CHAPTER IV THE STAGE OP INQUIRY . . . .54 CHAPTER V THE EFFECT OF THE INQUIRY ON PUBLIC OPINION. 71 CHAPTER VI THE LAW OF CHARITABLE TRUSTS . . .92 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER VII SOME ADDITIONAL DUTIES OP THE CHARITY COM MISSIONERS . . . . .109 CHAPTER VIII THE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN LEGAL AND VOLUNTARY AGENCIES OF RELIEF . . . .134 CHAPTER IX MEDICAL RELIEF AND HOSPITAL REFORM . .178 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE term charity has two meanings which at the out set it may be convenient to distinguish. It means, on the one hand, theChristian virtue as described in the never-to-be-forgotten language of the apostle in his Epistle to the Corinthians. It means, on the other hand, a certain abnormal economic method for distributing the good things of this world. It is abnormal in contra distinction to the normal economic methods of distribu tion, which are exchange, bequest, inheritance, and gift in so far as this last proceeds spontaneously from the social ties of family and friendship...

Details of the book - The State and Charity


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406771527
ISBN (ISBN-10): 140677152X
Paperback
Publishing year: 2007
Publisher: DODO PR
212 Pages
Weight: 0,272 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 19.03.2008 14:48:55
Book found last time on 24.10.2012 15:27:51
ISBN/EAN: 9781406771527

ISBN - alternate spelling:
1-4067-7152-X, 978-1-4067-7152-7


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