English
United States
FILTER
- 0 Results
Lowest price: 8.06 €, highest price: 22.26 €, average price: 13.64 €
Speaking of the Turks - Bey, Mufaty-Zade K. Zia
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Bey, Mufaty-Zade K. Zia:
Speaking of the Turks - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 1406771023, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406771022

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 276 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=16mm, Gew.=354gr, [GR: 23690 - TB/Reiseberichte/Welt gesamt, Pole], [SW: - Travel - General], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: SPEAKING OF THE TURKS CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. HOMECOMING 3 II. SUMMER MONTHS,16 III. ERENKEUY 29 IV. MODERN TURKISH WOMEN 47 V. LIFE ON THE BOSPHORUS 67 VI. STAMBOUL 87 VII. BUSINESS IN CONSTANTINOPLE 107 VIII. A STAMBOUL NIGHT 127 IX. A NIGHT IN PERA 145 X. CONSTANTINOPLE, 1922 161 XL ROBERT COLLEGE 183 XII. EDUCATION AND ART 204 XIII. A GLIMPSE OF ISLAM 224 XIV. A VOICE FROM ANATOLIA 245 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Speaking of The Turks i HOMECOMING were arriving at Constantinople, my native city, from which I had been absent nearly ten years. I had been in America all this time. At first my business interests and later the gen eral war had prevented my coming back to my own country even on a visit. I was of military age and Turkey was under blockade. When I had left Constantinople a few years after the Turkish revolution, the whole country was exhil arated, filled with joy, with ambition and with hope. Freedom and emancipation from an auto cratic domination had been obtained. Nothing was to prevent the normal advance of Turkey and the Turks along the road to progress. We were at last to obtain full recognition as a civilized nation. We were at last to receive equal treat ment from the other European nations. But, alas, during the following years the gods decided otherwise. Long, interminable wars either waged or-fomented by neighbouring enemies had hampered the progress of Turkey. Fitst - in 4 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Tripolitania, then in Arabia and Albania, then again in the Balkans and finally during the gen eral war the Turkish nation had been nearly bled to death. And now I was returning to my country, and my native city was groaning under a domi nation a thousand times worse even thanautoc racy the domination of victorious foreign coun tries Yet I was elated homecoming is always excit ing and the entrance to Constantinople by boat is always intoxicating. Besides, I was newly mar ried. My young bride an American girl from New Orleans was with me and I was anxious to show her my country so maligned by the inter national press. Our boat stopped at the Point of the Seraglio and a tug brought the Inter-Allied control on board. The ships manifesto and the passports of all passengers had to be examined by the rep resentatives of the foreign armies of occupation. I was the only Turk on board and my wife and I travelled of course on a Turkish passport. We had been obliged to obtain a special permit from the Inter-Allied authorities before we could even start home. I took my turn with my wife, in the line of passengers. We showed our passport to the officer in charge he glanced at it and seeing it was Turkish, asked us to wait. Our passport was in perfect order, but I believe that just for the pleasure of humiliating a Turk the officer de HOMECOMING 5 cided to examine everybody elses passport before mine, and kept me waiting till the last An Italian friend of mine who happened to travel with us, stood near us to vouch for me in case of need, I was coming back to my own country and I might need the assistance of a foreigner Poor Turkey, what had happened to you Poor Turks, what had become of our illusions of ten years ago which made us believe that being at last a free and democratic country we would be recognized as a civilized nation, and would receive equal treatment from the other European nations. Our hopes were being systematically trampled un der the spurred heels offoreigners, whose one desire seemed to be to eradicate for ever even our self-respect, the better to destroy our freedom, the better to hamper our march toward progress, the better to annihilate our national independence The Inter-Allied officer had humiliated me he could do nothing more my passport was in order. The boat proceeded into the harbour. The magnificent panorama of the Bosphorus and of the Golden Horn unfolded once more be fore my eyes. I tried to forget the incident of the passport with all its disheartening significance... SPEAKING OF THE TURKS CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. HOMECOMING 3 II. SUMMER MONTHS,16 III. ERENKEUY 29 IV. MODERN TURKISH WOMEN 47 V. LIFE ON THE BOSPHORUS 67 VI. STAMBOUL 87 VII. BUSINESS IN CONSTANTINOPLE 107 VIII. A STAMBOUL NIGHT 127 IX. A NIGHT IN PERA 145 X. CONSTANTINOPLE, 1922 161 XL ROBERT COLLEGE 183 XII. EDUCATION AND ART 204 XIII. A GLIMPSE OF ISLAM 224 XIV. A VOICE FROM ANATOLIA 245 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Speaking of The Turks i HOMECOMING were arriving at Constantinople, my native city, from which I had been absent nearly ten years. I had been in America all this time. At first my business interests and later the gen eral war had prevented my coming back to my own country even on a visit. I was of military age and Turkey was under blockade. When I had left Constantinople a few years after the Turkish revolution, the whole country was exhil arated, filled with joy, with ambition and with hope. Freedom and emancipation from an auto cratic domination had been obtained. Nothing was to prevent the normal advance of Turkey and the Turks along the road to progress. We were at last to obtain full recognition as a civilized nation. We were at last to receive equal treat ment from the other European nations. But, alas, during the following years the gods decided otherwise. Long, interminable wars either waged or-fomented by neighbouring enemies had hampered the progress of Turkey. Fitst - in 4 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Tripolitania, then in Arabia and Albania, then again in the Balkans and finally during the gen eral war the Turkish nation had been nearly bled to death. And now I was returning to my country, and my native city was groaning under a domi nation a thousand times worse even thanautoc racy the domination of victorious foreign coun tries Yet I was elated homecoming is always excit ing and the entrance to Constantinople by boat is always intoxicating. Besides, I was newly mar ried. My young bride an American girl from New Orleans was with me and I was anxious to show her my country so maligned by the inter national press. Our boat stopped at the Point of the Seraglio and a tug brought the Inter-Allied control on board. The ships manifesto and the passports of all passengers had to be examined by the rep resentatives of the foreign armies of occupation. I was the only Turk on board and my wife and I travelled of course on a Turkish passport. We had been obliged to obtain a special permit from the Inter-Allied authorities before we could even start home. I took my turn with my wife, in the line of passengers. We showed our passport to the officer in charge he glanced at it and seeing it was Turkish, asked us to wait. Our passport was in perfect order, but I believe that just for the pleasure of humiliating a Turk the officer de HOMECOMING 5 cided to examine everybody elses passport before mine, and kept me waiting till the last An Italian friend of mine who happened to travel with us, stood near us to vouch for me in case of need, I was coming back to my own country and I might need the assistance of a foreigner Poor Turkey, what had happened to you Poor Turks, what had become of our illusions of ten years ago which made us believe that being at last a free and democratic country we would be recognized as a civilized nation, and would receive equal treatment from the other European nations. Our hopes were being systematically trampled un der the spurred heels offoreigners, whose one desire seemed to be to eradicate for ever even our self-respect, the better to destroy our freedom, the better to hamper our march toward progress, the better to annihilate our national independence The Inter-Allied officer had humiliated me he could do nothing more my passport was in order. The boat proceeded into the harbour. The magnificent panorama of the Bosphorus and of the Golden Horn unfolded once more be fore my eyes. I tried to forget the incident of the passport with all its disheartening significance...

New book DEU
Buchgeier.com
Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen (Besorgungstitel) Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Speaking of the Turks - Bey, Mufaty-Zade K. Zia
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Bey, Mufaty-Zade K. Zia:
Speaking of the Turks - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 1406771023, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen

ID: 9781406771022

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 276 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=16mm, Gew.=354gr, [GR: 23690 - TB/Reiseberichte/Welt gesamt, Pole], [SW: - Travel - General], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: SPEAKING OF THE TURKS CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. HOMECOMING 3 II. SUMMER MONTHS,16 III. ERENKEUY 29 IV. MODERN TURKISH WOMEN 47 V. LIFE ON THE BOSPHORUS 67 VI. STAMBOUL 87 VII. BUSINESS IN CONSTANTINOPLE 107 VIII. A STAMBOUL NIGHT 127 IX. A NIGHT IN PERA 145 X. CONSTANTINOPLE, 1922 161 XL ROBERT COLLEGE 183 XII. EDUCATION AND ART 204 XIII. A GLIMPSE OF ISLAM 224 XIV. A VOICE FROM ANATOLIA 245 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Speaking of The Turks i HOMECOMING were arriving at Constantinople, my native city, from which I had been absent nearly ten years. I had been in America all this time. At first my business interests and later the gen eral war had prevented my coming back to my own country even on a visit. I was of military age and Turkey was under blockade. When I had left Constantinople a few years after the Turkish revolution, the whole country was exhil arated, filled with joy, with ambition and with hope. Freedom and emancipation from an auto cratic domination had been obtained. Nothing was to prevent the normal advance of Turkey and the Turks along the road to progress. We were at last to obtain full recognition as a civilized nation. We were at last to receive equal treat ment from the other European nations. But, alas, during the following years the gods decided otherwise. Long, interminable wars either waged or-fomented by neighbouring enemies had hampered the progress of Turkey. Fitst - in 4 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Tripolitania, then in Arabia and Albania, then again in the Balkans and finally during the gen eral war the Turkish nation had been nearly bled to death. And now I was returning to my country, and my native city was groaning under a domi nation a thousand times worse even thanautoc racy the domination of victorious foreign coun tries Yet I was elated homecoming is always excit ing and the entrance to Constantinople by boat is always intoxicating. Besides, I was newly mar ried. My young bride an American girl from New Orleans was with me and I was anxious to show her my country so maligned by the inter national press. Our boat stopped at the Point of the Seraglio and a tug brought the Inter-Allied control on board. The ships manifesto and the passports of all passengers had to be examined by the rep resentatives of the foreign armies of occupation. I was the only Turk on board and my wife and I travelled of course on a Turkish passport. We had been obliged to obtain a special permit from the Inter-Allied authorities before we could even start home. I took my turn with my wife, in the line of passengers. We showed our passport to the officer in charge he glanced at it and seeing it was Turkish, asked us to wait. Our passport was in perfect order, but I believe that just for the pleasure of humiliating a Turk the officer de HOMECOMING 5 cided to examine everybody elses passport before mine, and kept me waiting till the last An Italian friend of mine who happened to travel with us, stood near us to vouch for me in case of need, I was coming back to my own country and I might need the assistance of a foreigner Poor Turkey, what had happened to you Poor Turks, what had become of our illusions of ten years ago which made us believe that being at last a free and democratic country we would be recognized as a civilized nation, and would receive equal treatment from the other European nations. Our hopes were being systematically trampled un der the spurred heels offoreigners, whose one desire seemed to be to eradicate for ever even our self-respect, the better to destroy our freedom, the better to hamper our march toward progress, the better to annihilate our national independence The Inter-Allied officer had humiliated me he could do nothing more my passport was in order. The boat proceeded into the harbour. The magnificent panorama of the Bosphorus and of the Golden Horn unfolded once more be fore my eyes. I tried to forget the incident of the passport with all its disheartening significance...

New book eurobuch.neubuch
Buchgeier.com
Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen (Besorgungstitel)
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Speaking of the Turks - Mufaty-Zade K Zia Bey
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Mufaty-Zade K Zia Bey:
Speaking of the Turks - Paperback

ISBN: 1406771023

ID: 1170673215

[EAN: 9781406771022], Neubuch, [PU: Cartwright Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., Speaking of the Turks, Mufaty-Zade K Zia Bey, SPEAKING OF THE TURKS CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. HOMECOMING 3 II. SUMMER MONTHS,16 III. ERENKEUY 29 IV. MODERN TURKISH WOMEN 47 V. LIFE ON THE BOSPHORUS 67 VI. STAMBOUL 87 VII. BUSINESS IN CONSTANTINOPLE 107 VIII. A STAMBOUL NIGHT 127 IX. A NIGHT IN PERA 145 X. CONSTANTINOPLE, 1922 161 XL ROBERT COLLEGE 183 XII. EDUCATION AND ART 204 XIII. A GLIMPSE OF ISLAM 224 XIV. A VOICE FROM ANATOLIA 245 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Speaking of The Turks i HOMECOMING were arriving at Constantinople, my native city, from which I had been absent nearly ten years. I had been in America all this time. At first my business interests and later the gen eral war had prevented my coming back to my own country even on a visit. I was of military age and Turkey was under blockade. When I had left Constantinople a few years after the Turkish revolution, the whole country was exhil arated, filled with joy, with ambition and with hope. Freedom and emancipation from an auto cratic domination had been obtained. Nothing was to prevent the normal advance of Turkey and the Turks along the road to progress. We were at last to obtain full recognition as a civilized nation. We were at last to receive equal treat ment from the other European nations. But, alas, during the following years the gods decided otherwise. Long, interminable wars either waged or-fomented by neighbouring enemies had hampered the progress of Turkey. Fitst - in 4 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Tripolitania, then in Arabia and Albania, then again in the Balkans and finally during the gen eral war the Turkish nation had been nearly bled to death. And now I was returning to my country, and my native city was groaning under a domi nation a thousand times worse even thanautoc racy the domination of victorious foreign coun tries Yet I was elated homecoming is always excit ing and the entrance to Constantinople by boat is always intoxicating. Besides, I was newly mar ried. My young bride an American girl from New Orleans was with me and I was anxious to show her my country so maligned by the inter national press. Our boat stopped at the Point of the Seraglio and a tug brought the Inter-Allied control on board. The ships manifesto and the passports of all passengers had to be examined by the rep resentatives of the foreign armies of occupation. I was the only Turk on board and my wife and I travelled of course on a Turkish passport. We had been obliged to obtain a special permit from the Inter-Allied authorities before we could even start home. I took my turn with my wife, in the line of passengers. We showed our passport to the officer in charge he glanced at it and seeing it was Turkish, asked us to wait. Our passport was in perfect order, but I believe that just for the pleasure of humiliating a Turk the officer de HOMECOMING 5 cided to examine everybody elses passport before mine, and kept me waiting till the last An Italian friend of mine who happened to travel with us, stood near us to vouch for me in case of need, I was coming back to my own country and I might need the assistance of a foreigner Poor Turkey, what had happened to you Poor Turks, what had become of our illusions of ten years ago which made us believe that being at last a free and democratic country we would be recognized as a civilized nation, and would receive equal treatment from the other European nations. Our hopes were being systematically trampled un der the spurred heels offoreigners, whose one desire seemed to be to eradicate for ever even our self-respect, the better to destroy our freedom, the better to hamper our march toward progress, the better to annihilate our national independence The Inter-Allied officer had humiliated me he could do nothing more my passport was in order. The boat proceeded into the harbour. The magnificent panorama of the Bosphorus and of the Golden Horn unfolded once more be fore my eyes. I tried to forget the incident of the passport

New book Abebooks.de
THE SAINT BOOKSTORE, Southport, MSY, United Kingdom [51194787] [Rating: 5 (von 5)]
NEW BOOK Shipping costs: EUR 5.48
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Speaking Of The Turks - Mufaty-Zade K. Zia Bey
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Mufaty-Zade K. Zia Bey:
Speaking Of The Turks - Paperback

ISBN: 9781406771022

Paperback, [PU: Read Books], Travel Writing

New book Bookdepository.com
Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.

Details of the book
Speaking of the Turks

SPEAKING OF THE TURKS CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. HOMECOMING 3 II. SUMMER MONTHS,16 III. ERENKEUY 29 IV. MODERN TURKISH WOMEN 47 V. LIFE ON THE BOSPHORUS 67 VI. STAMBOUL 87 VII. BUSINESS IN CONSTANTINOPLE 107 VIII. A STAMBOUL NIGHT 127 IX. A NIGHT IN PERA 145 X. CONSTANTINOPLE, 1922 161 XL ROBERT COLLEGE 183 XII. EDUCATION AND ART 204 XIII. A GLIMPSE OF ISLAM 224 XIV. A VOICE FROM ANATOLIA 245 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Speaking of The Turks i HOMECOMING were arriving at Constantinople, my native city, from which I had been absent nearly ten years. I had been in America all this time. At first my business interests and later the gen eral war had prevented my coming back to my own country even on a visit. I was of military age and Turkey was under blockade. When I had left Constantinople a few years after the Turkish revolution, the whole country was exhil arated, filled with joy, with ambition and with hope. Freedom and emancipation from an auto cratic domination had been obtained. Nothing was to prevent the normal advance of Turkey and the Turks along the road to progress. We were at last to obtain full recognition as a civilized nation. We were at last to receive equal treat ment from the other European nations. But, alas, during the following years the gods decided otherwise. Long, interminable wars either waged or-fomented by neighbouring enemies had hampered the progress of Turkey. Fitst - in 4 SPEAKING OF THE TURKS Tripolitania, then in Arabia and Albania, then again in the Balkans and finally during the gen eral war the Turkish nation had been nearly bled to death. And now I was returning to my country, and my native city was groaning under a domi nation a thousand times worse even thanautoc racy the domination of victorious foreign coun tries Yet I was elated homecoming is always excit ing and the entrance to Constantinople by boat is always intoxicating. Besides, I was newly mar ried. My young bride an American girl from New Orleans was with me and I was anxious to show her my country so maligned by the inter national press. Our boat stopped at the Point of the Seraglio and a tug brought the Inter-Allied control on board. The ships manifesto and the passports of all passengers had to be examined by the rep resentatives of the foreign armies of occupation. I was the only Turk on board and my wife and I travelled of course on a Turkish passport. We had been obliged to obtain a special permit from the Inter-Allied authorities before we could even start home. I took my turn with my wife, in the line of passengers. We showed our passport to the officer in charge he glanced at it and seeing it was Turkish, asked us to wait. Our passport was in perfect order, but I believe that just for the pleasure of humiliating a Turk the officer de HOMECOMING 5 cided to examine everybody elses passport before mine, and kept me waiting till the last An Italian friend of mine who happened to travel with us, stood near us to vouch for me in case of need, I was coming back to my own country and I might need the assistance of a foreigner Poor Turkey, what had happened to you Poor Turks, what had become of our illusions of ten years ago which made us believe that being at last a free and democratic country we would be recognized as a civilized nation, and would receive equal treatment from the other European nations. Our hopes were being systematically trampled un der the spurred heels offoreigners, whose one desire seemed to be to eradicate for ever even our self-respect, the better to destroy our freedom, the better to hamper our march toward progress, the better to annihilate our national independence The Inter-Allied officer had humiliated me he could do nothing more my passport was in order. The boat proceeded into the harbour. The magnificent panorama of the Bosphorus and of the Golden Horn unfolded once more be fore my eyes. I tried to forget the incident of the passport with all its disheartening significance...

Details of the book - Speaking of the Turks


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406771022
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406771023
Paperback
Publishing year: 2007
Publisher: DODO PR
276 Pages
Weight: 0,354 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 15.01.2008 14:20:36
Book found last time on 25.12.2012 21:07:22
ISBN/EAN: 9781406771022

ISBN - alternate spelling:
1-4067-7102-3, 978-1-4067-7102-2


< to archive...
Related books