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Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado - Beamont, Roland
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Beamont, Roland:
Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado - signed or inscribed book

2002, ISBN: 9780850598506

Paperback, Hardcover, ID: 286014274

Toronto: MacMillan of Canada, 1982. First Canadian Edition Signed. Hardcover. Fine/Fine Dust Jacket. Creased at the outer edges. Clean with no gift inscription or remainder mark. 192 pages with no index. signed large gift inscription at the verso of the second page.Large Heavy Books May Need More Payment For Overseas Delivery., MacMillan of Canada, 1982, Toronto: MacMillan of Canada, 1982. First Canadian Edition Signed. Hardcover. Fine/Fine. Creased at the outer edges. Clean with no gift inscription or remainder mark. 192 pages with no index. signed at the verso of the second page.Large Heavy Books May Need More Payment For Overseas Delivery., MacMillan of Canada, 1982, New York City, New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1974. "THE BITTER YEARS shatters the myths and corrects the misconceptions as it details the dramatic chapters of Scandinavia's wartime experience: the sinking of the German cruiser Bluecher with the loss of more than 1,000 soldiers and crewmen; the halfhearted Allied campaign at Narvik; the Norwegian SOE raid on the Norsk Hydro heavy-water plant so essential to Germany's development of an atomic bomb; the imprisonment of Norwegian schoolmasters in the Artic; the destiny of all Norwegian Jews and the miraculous rescue of the Danish Jews; the destruction of Finnmark by the Germans; the remarkable evacuation of Scandinavian prisoners from German concentration camps by the Sedish White Buses; and, finally the liberationm of Denmark and Norway and the bitter residue that remained." This book has 403 pages and is illustrated throughout. The text contains NO internal marks whatsoever.. First Paperback Printing. Trade Paperback. Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall., William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1974, Wellingborough: Patrick Stephens. Very Good in Good dust jacket. 1986. First Edition. Hardcover. 0850598508 . 160 pages, well illustrated (some in color) , cloth, DJ, very good. From Wikipedia: "Wing Commander Roland Prosper "Bee" Beamont CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC & Bar (August 10, 1920 — November 19, 2001) was a British fighter pilot and test pilot for the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, and the years that followed. Born in Chichester, Sussex, he was educated at Eastbourne College. Beamont's operational career began in 1939, flying Hawker Hurricanes with No. 87 Squadron RAF stationed at Lille in France with the air contingent of the British Expeditionary Force, scoring 3 'kills' against German aircraft. With the withdrawal of British forces from the continent following the fall of France he took part in the Battle of Britain, claiming 3 more 'kills', after which he was involved with nightfighting trials with the Hurricane. He was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross in June 1941, and was posted to No. 79 Squadron RAF, although he was court-martialled for transporting a WAAF to a dance at another RAF station in his single-seat Hurricane, and was severely admonished. In December 1941 he was attached to Hawker's at Langley as a Production and Experimental Test Pilot. In July 1942 he was back on operational flying, joining No. 609 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Typhoons and subsequently promoted to Squadron Commander. As Commanding Officer of one of the first Squadrons to operate the new and technically troublesome Typhoon, Beamont was instrumental in arguing for keeping the aircraft in RAF service against increasing establishment resistance while he assisted Hawker's in resolving the type's airframe and engine problems. His confidence in the Typhoon was vindicated as the aircraft eventually became the RAF's most successful ground-attack aircraft during 1944-5. In 1943 he returned to Hawker's as a test pilot, performing experimental testing of the Hawker Tempest alongside the Hawker's test pilot, Bill Humble. In 1944, prior to D-Day, he again resumed operational flying, this time forming the first Tempest Wing (No. 150) with the rank of Acting-Wing Commander, the Wing accounting for three Me 109s over the invasion beaches shortly after D-Day without loss, two credited to Beamont. At this time the Wing were switched to intercepting V-1s over Kent, shooting down 638, Beamont accounting for 32 of the unpiloted-flying bombs himself. On October 2, 1944, now based on the continent at Volkel, Holland, he achieved his ninth and final kill of the war when he shot down a Fw 190 near Nijmegen. On October 12, while attacking a heavily defended troop-train near Bocholt on his 492nd operational mission he was shot down, becoming a Prisoner of War. Confined firstly to Stalag-III at Sagan, near Breslau, then to Stalag III-A at Luckenwalde, near Potsdam, he remained a PoW until the end of the war in Europe, being finally repatriated in late May 1945 after being further detained with the other former POWs by the Russians. With the end of hostilities his planned transfer to the Far East in command of a Wing of Tempest IIs was cancelled and he applied for a permanent commission. The eventual offer of a permanent commission coincided with his being offered a position as a test pilot; he resumed his career as a test pilot, performing the initial test flying of many notable aircraft, including the Canberra and Lightning (see radio interview details below) , as well as the later-cancelled BAC TSR-2. In 1948, while visiting the US to fly the North American B-45 Tornado bomber, he was able to persuade the US authorities to give him permission to fly one of the only two XP-86 Sabres then built, based at Muroc Field. Briefed by test pilot George Welch, Beamont flew the XP-86 in May of that year, breaking the sound barrier (exceeding Mach 1) on his one and only flight in the aircraft, the third person to do so in the XP-86. He subsequently went on to become a director of the Warton division of BAC, later BAe, as a Director of Flight Operations. From 1970 he was responsible for the international testing of the Tornado MRCA. In 1979 he retired, devoting himself to writing and contributing to various aeronautical publications. He died on 19 November 2001 at the age of 81. Beamont has the distinction of being the first pilot to make a double-atlantic crossing by jet, when on 26 August 1952, flying Canberra B.5 VX185, he flew from Aldergrove to Gander and then back again to Aldergove, in 10 hours 3 minutes. In 2002 was posthumously awarded the Belgian Croix de guerre." ., Patrick Stephens, 1986

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Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado - Beamont, Roland
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Beamont, Roland:
Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado - Paperback

2002, ISBN: 9780850598506

Hardcover, ID: 760477245

Munich: Kirchliche Hilfsstelle, 1950.. Scenes from the Passion of Silesia. Published to commemorate the 5th anniversary of the Silesian tragedy. Pp.126, many black & white portrait photos, pages browned. Paperback with dustwrapper which has edge chips. Good/G+.** "The Polish and Jewish population of Silesia was subjected to genocide involving ethnic cleansing and mass murder, while German colonists were settled in pursuit of Lebensraum Two thousand Polish intellectuals, politicians and businessmen were murdered in the "Intelligenzaktion Schlesien" in 1940 as part of a Poland wide Germanization program. Silesia also housed one of the two main wartime centers where medical experiments were conducted on kidnapped Polish children by Nazis.The Potsdam Conference of 1945 concluded that the Oder-Neisse line would be the official border between Germany and Poland. Millions of Germans in Silesia, either fled or were expelled, and were replaced later by Polish population settled from other regions. Furthermore, the newly formed Polish United Workers' Party created a Ministry of the Recovered Territories that claimed half of the available arable land for state-run collectivized farms. Many Silesian residents not only resented the Germans for their invasion in 1939 and brutality in occupation, but now also the newly formed Polish communist government for their population shifting and interference in agricultural, as well as industrial, affairs."(wiki). ., Munich: Kirchliche Hilfsstelle, 1950., Wellingborough: Patrick Stephens. Very Good in Good dust jacket. 1986. First Edition. Hardcover. 0850598508 . 160 pages, well illustrated (some in color) , cloth, DJ, very good. From Wikipedia: "Wing Commander Roland Prosper "Bee" Beamont CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC & Bar (August 10, 1920 — November 19, 2001) was a British fighter pilot and test pilot for the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, and the years that followed. Born in Chichester, Sussex, he was educated at Eastbourne College. Beamont's operational career began in 1939, flying Hawker Hurricanes with No. 87 Squadron RAF stationed at Lille in France with the air contingent of the British Expeditionary Force, scoring 3 'kills' against German aircraft. With the withdrawal of British forces from the continent following the fall of France he took part in the Battle of Britain, claiming 3 more 'kills', after which he was involved with nightfighting trials with the Hurricane. He was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross in June 1941, and was posted to No. 79 Squadron RAF, although he was court-martialled for transporting a WAAF to a dance at another RAF station in his single-seat Hurricane, and was severely admonished. In December 1941 he was attached to Hawker's at Langley as a Production and Experimental Test Pilot. In July 1942 he was back on operational flying, joining No. 609 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Typhoons and subsequently promoted to Squadron Commander. As Commanding Officer of one of the first Squadrons to operate the new and technically troublesome Typhoon, Beamont was instrumental in arguing for keeping the aircraft in RAF service against increasing establishment resistance while he assisted Hawker's in resolving the type's airframe and engine problems. His confidence in the Typhoon was vindicated as the aircraft eventually became the RAF's most successful ground-attack aircraft during 1944-5. In 1943 he returned to Hawker's as a test pilot, performing experimental testing of the Hawker Tempest alongside the Hawker's test pilot, Bill Humble. In 1944, prior to D-Day, he again resumed operational flying, this time forming the first Tempest Wing (No. 150) with the rank of Acting-Wing Commander, the Wing accounting for three Me 109s over the invasion beaches shortly after D-Day without loss, two credited to Beamont. At this time the Wing were switched to intercepting V-1s over Kent, shooting down 638, Beamont accounting for 32 of the unpiloted-flying bombs himself. On October 2, 1944, now based on the continent at Volkel, Holland, he achieved his ninth and final kill of the war when he shot down a Fw 190 near Nijmegen. On October 12, while attacking a heavily defended troop-train near Bocholt on his 492nd operational mission he was shot down, becoming a Prisoner of War. Confined firstly to Stalag-III at Sagan, near Breslau, then to Stalag III-A at Luckenwalde, near Potsdam, he remained a PoW until the end of the war in Europe, being finally repatriated in late May 1945 after being further detained with the other former POWs by the Russians. With the end of hostilities his planned transfer to the Far East in command of a Wing of Tempest IIs was cancelled and he applied for a permanent commission. The eventual offer of a permanent commission coincided with his being offered a position as a test pilot; he resumed his career as a test pilot, performing the initial test flying of many notable aircraft, including the Canberra and Lightning (see radio interview details below) , as well as the later-cancelled BAC TSR-2. In 1948, while visiting the US to fly the North American B-45 Tornado bomber, he was able to persuade the US authorities to give him permission to fly one of the only two XP-86 Sabres then built, based at Muroc Field. Briefed by test pilot George Welch, Beamont flew the XP-86 in May of that year, breaking the sound barrier (exceeding Mach 1) on his one and only flight in the aircraft, the third person to do so in the XP-86. He subsequently went on to become a director of the Warton division of BAC, later BAe, as a Director of Flight Operations. From 1970 he was responsible for the international testing of the Tornado MRCA. In 1979 he retired, devoting himself to writing and contributing to various aeronautical publications. He died on 19 November 2001 at the age of 81. Beamont has the distinction of being the first pilot to make a double-atlantic crossing by jet, when on 26 August 1952, flying Canberra B.5 VX185, he flew from Aldergrove to Gander and then back again to Aldergove, in 10 hours 3 minutes. In 2002 was posthumously awarded the Belgian Croix de guerre." ., Patrick Stephens, 1986

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Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado - Beamont, Roland
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Beamont, Roland:
Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado - hardcover

2002, ISBN: 9780850598506

ID: 476810421

Wellingborough: Patrick Stephens. Very Good in Good dust jacket. 1986. First Edition. Hardcover. 0850598508 . 160 pages, well illustrated (some in color) , cloth, DJ, very good. From Wikipedia: "Wing Commander Roland Prosper "Bee" Beamont CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC & Bar (August 10, 1920 — November 19, 2001) was a British fighter pilot and test pilot for the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, and the years that followed. Born in Chichester, Sussex, he was educated at Eastbourne College. Beamont's operational career began in 1939, flying Hawker Hurricanes with No. 87 Squadron RAF stationed at Lille in France with the air contingent of the British Expeditionary Force, scoring 3 'kills' against German aircraft. With the withdrawal of British forces from the continent following the fall of France he took part in the Battle of Britain, claiming 3 more 'kills', after which he was involved with nightfighting trials with the Hurricane. He was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross in June 1941, and was posted to No. 79 Squadron RAF, although he was court-martialled for transporting a WAAF to a dance at another RAF station in his single-seat Hurricane, and was severely admonished. In December 1941 he was attached to Hawker's at Langley as a Production and Experimental Test Pilot. In July 1942 he was back on operational flying, joining No. 609 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Typhoons and subsequently promoted to Squadron Commander. As Commanding Officer of one of the first Squadrons to operate the new and technically troublesome Typhoon, Beamont was instrumental in arguing for keeping the aircraft in RAF service against increasing establishment resistance while he assisted Hawker's in resolving the type's airframe and engine problems. His confidence in the Typhoon was vindicated as the aircraft eventually became the RAF's most successful ground-attack aircraft during 1944-5. In 1943 he returned to Hawker's as a test pilot, performing experimental testing of the Hawker Tempest alongside the Hawker's test pilot, Bill Humble. In 1944, prior to D-Day, he again resumed operational flying, this time forming the first Tempest Wing (No. 150) with the rank of Acting-Wing Commander, the Wing accounting for three Me 109s over the invasion beaches shortly after D-Day without loss, two credited to Beamont. At this time the Wing were switched to intercepting V-1s over Kent, shooting down 638, Beamont accounting for 32 of the unpiloted-flying bombs himself. On October 2, 1944, now based on the continent at Volkel, Holland, he achieved his ninth and final kill of the war when he shot down a Fw 190 near Nijmegen. On October 12, while attacking a heavily defended troop-train near Bocholt on his 492nd operational mission he was shot down, becoming a Prisoner of War. Confined firstly to Stalag-III at Sagan, near Breslau, then to Stalag III-A at Luckenwalde, near Potsdam, he remained a PoW until the end of the war in Europe, being finally repatriated in late May 1945 after being further detained with the other former POWs by the Russians. With the end of hostilities his planned transfer to the Far East in command of a Wing of Tempest IIs was cancelled and he applied for a permanent commission. The eventual offer of a permanent commission coincided with his being offered a position as a test pilot; he resumed his career as a test pilot, performing the initial test flying of many notable aircraft, including the Canberra and Lightning (see radio interview details below) , as well as the later-cancelled BAC TSR-2. In 1948, while visiting the US to fly the North American B-45 Tornado bomber, he was able to persuade the US authorities to give him permission to fly one of the only two XP-86 Sabres then built, based at Muroc Field. Briefed by test pilot George Welch, Beamont flew the XP-86 in May of that year, breaking the sound barrier (exceeding Mach 1) on his one and only flight in the aircraft, the third person to do so in the XP-86. He subsequently went on to become a director of the Warton division of BAC, later BAe, as a Director of Flight Operations. From 1970 he was responsible for the international testing of the Tornado MRCA. In 1979 he retired, devoting himself to writing and contributing to various aeronautical publications. He died on 19 November 2001 at the age of 81. Beamont has the distinction of being the first pilot to make a double-atlantic crossing by jet, when on 26 August 1952, flying Canberra B.5 VX185, he flew from Aldergrove to Gander and then back again to Aldergove, in 10 hours 3 minutes. In 2002 was posthumously awarded the Belgian Croix de guerre." ., Patrick Stephens, 1986

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Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado. - Beamont, Roland
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Beamont, Roland:
Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado. - First edition

1986, ISBN: 0850598508

Hardcover, ID: 6479472702

[EAN: 9780850598506], Gebraucht, sehr guter Zustand, [PU: Patrick Stephens, Wellingborough], GERMANY WWII AVIATION AERONAUTICS FIGHTER AIRCRAFT AIRPLANES WORLD WAR II SECOND TWO, Transportation|General, Jacket, 160 pages, well illustrated (some in color) , cloth, DJ, very good. From Wikipedia: "Wing Commander Roland Prosper "Bee" Beamont CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC & Bar (August 10, 1920 — November 19, 2001) was a British fighter pilot and test pilot for the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, and the years that followed. Born in Chichester, Sussex, he was educated at Eastbourne College. Beamont's operational career began in 1939, flying Hawker Hurricanes with No. 87 Squadron RAF stationed at Lille in France with the air contingent of the British Expeditionary Force, scoring 3 'kills' against German aircraft. With the withdrawal of British forces from the continent following the fall of France he took part in the Battle of Britain, claiming 3 more 'kills', after which he was involved with nightfighting trials with the Hurricane. He was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross in June 1941, and was posted to No. 79 Squadron RAF, although he was court-martialled for transporting a WAAF to a dance at another RAF station in his single-seat Hurricane, and was severely admonished. In December 1941 he was attached to Hawker's at Langley as a Production and Experimental Test Pilot. In July 1942 he was back on operational flying, joining No. 609 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Typhoons and subsequently promoted to Squadron Commander. As Commanding Officer of one of the first Squadrons to operate the new and technically troublesome Typhoon, Beamont was instrumental in arguing for keeping the aircraft in RAF service against increasing establishment resistance while he assisted Hawker's in resolving the type's airframe and engine problems. His confidence in the Typhoon was vindicated as the aircraft eventually became the RAF's most successful ground-attack aircraft during 1944-5. In 1943 he returned to Hawker's as a test pilot, performing experimental testing of the Hawker Tempest alongside the Hawker's test pilot, Bill Humble. In 1944, prior to D-Day, he again resumed operational flying, this time forming the first Tempest Wing (No. 150) with the rank of Acting-Wing Commander, the Wing accounting for three Me 109s over the invasion beaches shortly after D-Day without loss, two credited to Beamont. At this time the Wing were switched to intercepting V-1s over Kent, shooting down 638, Beamont accounting for 32 of the unpiloted-flying bombs himself. On October 2, 1944, now based on the continent at Volkel, Holland, he achieved his ninth and final kill of the war when he shot down a Fw 190 near Nijmegen. On October 12, while attacking a heavily defended troop-train near Bocholt on his 492nd operational mission he was shot down, becoming a Prisoner of War. Confined firstly to Stalag-III at Sagan, near Breslau, then to Stalag III-A at Luckenwalde, near Potsdam, he remained a PoW until the end of the war in Europe, being finally repatriated in late May 1945 after being further detained with the other former POWs by the Russians. With the end of hostilities his planned transfer to the Far East in command of a Wing of Tempest IIs was cancelled and he applied for a permanent commission. The eventual offer of a permanent commission coincided with his being offered a position as a test pilot; he resumed his career as a test pilot, performing the initial test flying of many notable aircraft, including the Canberra and Lightning (see radio interview details below) , as well as the later-cancelled BAC TSR-2. In 1948, while visiting the US to fly the North American B-45 Tornado bomber, he was able to persuade the US authorities to give him permission to fly one of the only two XP-86 Sabres then built, based at Muroc Field. Briefed by test pilot George Welch, Beamont flew the XP-86 in May of that year, breaking the sound barrier (exceeding Mach 1) on his one and only flight in the aircraft, the third person to do so in the XP-86. He subsequently went on to become a director of the Warton division of BAC, later BAe, as a Director of Flight Operations. From 1970 he was r

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Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado. - Beamont, Roland
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Beamont, Roland:
Fighter Test Pilot. from Hurricane to Tornado. - First edition

1986, ISBN: 0850598508

Hardcover, ID: 6479472702

[EAN: 9780850598506], Gebraucht, sehr guter Zustand, [PU: Patrick Stephens, Wellingborough], GERMANY WWII AVIATION AERONAUTICS FIGHTER AIRCRAFT AIRPLANES WORLD WAR II SECOND TWO, Jacket, 160 pages, well illustrated (some in color) , cloth, DJ, very good. From Wikipedia: "Wing Commander Roland Prosper "Bee" Beamont CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC & Bar (August 10, 1920 — November 19, 2001) was a British fighter pilot and test pilot for the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, and the years that followed. Born in Chichester, Sussex, he was educated at Eastbourne College. Beamont's operational career began in 1939, flying Hawker Hurricanes with No. 87 Squadron RAF stationed at Lille in France with the air contingent of the British Expeditionary Force, scoring 3 'kills' against German aircraft. With the withdrawal of British forces from the continent following the fall of France he took part in the Battle of Britain, claiming 3 more 'kills', after which he was involved with nightfighting trials with the Hurricane. He was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross in June 1941, and was posted to No. 79 Squadron RAF, although he was court-martialled for transporting a WAAF to a dance at another RAF station in his single-seat Hurricane, and was severely admonished. In December 1941 he was attached to Hawker's at Langley as a Production and Experimental Test Pilot. In July 1942 he was back on operational flying, joining No. 609 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Typhoons and subsequently promoted to Squadron Commander. As Commanding Officer of one of the first Squadrons to operate the new and technically troublesome Typhoon, Beamont was instrumental in arguing for keeping the aircraft in RAF service against increasing establishment resistance while he assisted Hawker's in resolving the type's airframe and engine problems. His confidence in the Typhoon was vindicated as the aircraft eventually became the RAF's most successful ground-attack aircraft during 1944-5. In 1943 he returned to Hawker's as a test pilot, performing experimental testing of the Hawker Tempest alongside the Hawker's test pilot, Bill Humble. In 1944, prior to D-Day, he again resumed operational flying, this time forming the first Tempest Wing (No. 150) with the rank of Acting-Wing Commander, the Wing accounting for three Me 109s over the invasion beaches shortly after D-Day without loss, two credited to Beamont. At this time the Wing were switched to intercepting V-1s over Kent, shooting down 638, Beamont accounting for 32 of the unpiloted-flying bombs himself. On October 2, 1944, now based on the continent at Volkel, Holland, he achieved his ninth and final kill of the war when he shot down a Fw 190 near Nijmegen. On October 12, while attacking a heavily defended troop-train near Bocholt on his 492nd operational mission he was shot down, becoming a Prisoner of War. Confined firstly to Stalag-III at Sagan, near Breslau, then to Stalag III-A at Luckenwalde, near Potsdam, he remained a PoW until the end of the war in Europe, being finally repatriated in late May 1945 after being further detained with the other former POWs by the Russians. With the end of hostilities his planned transfer to the Far East in command of a Wing of Tempest IIs was cancelled and he applied for a permanent commission. The eventual offer of a permanent commission coincided with his being offered a position as a test pilot; he resumed his career as a test pilot, performing the initial test flying of many notable aircraft, including the Canberra and Lightning (see radio interview details below) , as well as the later-cancelled BAC TSR-2. In 1948, while visiting the US to fly the North American B-45 Tornado bomber, he was able to persuade the US authorities to give him permission to fly one of the only two XP-86 Sabres then built, based at Muroc Field. Briefed by test pilot George Welch, Beamont flew the XP-86 in May of that year, breaking the sound barrier (exceeding Mach 1) on his one and only flight in the aircraft, the third person to do so in the XP-86. He subsequently went on to become a director of the Warton division of BAC, later BAe, as a Director of Flight Operations. From 1970 he was r

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Details of the book
Fighter Test Pilot: From Hurricane to Tornado
Author:

Roland Beamont

Title:

Fighter Test Pilot: From Hurricane to Tornado

ISBN:

Details of the book - Fighter Test Pilot: From Hurricane to Tornado


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780850598506
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0850598508
Hardcover
Paperback
Publishing year: 2002
Publisher: Patrick Stephens, Wellingborough

Book in our database since 26.03.2008 08:52:10
Book found last time on 29.06.2017 09:00:58
ISBN/EAN: 9780850598506

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-85059-850-8, 978-0-85059-850-6


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