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Persons, Roles, and Minds:  Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan - Tina Lu
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Tina Lu:
Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan - Paperback

2010, ISBN: 9780804742023

Hardcover, ID: 845754598

Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd. , 2010. First. Hardcover. New. 16 X 24. 6 B/w Illustrations and 1 Map. In this ambitious and pathbreaking book, Shawn McHale challenges long-held views that define modern Vietnamese history in terms of anticolonial nationalism and revolution. McHale argues instead for a historiography that does not overstress either the role of politics in general or Communism in particular. Using a wide range of sources from Vietnam, France, and the United States, many of them previously unexploited, he shows how the use of printed matter soared between 1920 and 1945 and in the process transformed Vietnamese public life and shaped the modern Vietnamese consciousness. Print and Power begins with an overview of Vietnam's lively public spheres, bringing debates from Europe and the rest of Asia to Vietnamese studies with nuance and sophistication. It examines the impact of the French colonial state on Vietnamese society as well as Vietnamese and East Asian understandings of public discourse and public space. Popular taste, rather than revolutionary or national ideology, determined to a large extent what was published, with limited intervention by the French authorities. A vibrant but hierarchical public realm of debate existed in Vietnam under auhoritarian colonial rule. The work goes on to contest the impact of Confucianism on premodern and modern Vietnam and based on materials never before used, provides a radically new perspective on the rise of Vietnamese communism from 1929 to 1945. Novel interpretations of the Nghe Tinh Soviets (1930-31), the first major communist uprising in Vietnam, and Vietnamese communist successes in World War II reveal the process by which communists built an audience for their views and made an extremely alien ideology comprehensible to growing numbers of Vietnamese. In what is by far the most thorough examination in English of modern Vietnamese Buddhism and its transformations, McHale argues that, contrary to received wisdom, Buddhism was not in decline during the 1920-45 period; in fact, more Buddhist texts were produced in Vietnam at that time than at any other in its history. This finding suggests that the heritage of the Vietnamese past played a crucial role in the late colonial period. Print and Power makes a significant contribution to Vietnamese and Asian studies and will be of compelling interest to those in the fields of comparative religion and European colonialism., Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 2010, Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd. , 2010. First. Hardcover. New. 16 X 24. 6 B/w Illustrations and 1 Map. In this ambitious and pathbreaking book, Shawn McHale challenges long-held views that define modern Vietnamese history in terms of anticolonial nationalism and revolution. McHale argues instead for a historiography that does not overstress either the role of politics in general or Communism in particular. Using a wide range of sources from Vietnam, France, and the United States, many of them previously unexploited, he shows how the use of printed matter soared between 1920 and 1945 and in the process transformed Vietnamese public life and shaped the modern Vietnamese consciousness. Print and Power begins with an overview of Vietnam's lively public spheres, bringing debates from Europe and the rest of Asia to Vietnamese studies with nuance and sophistication. It examines the impact of the French colonial state on Vietnamese society as well as Vietnamese and East Asian understandings of public discourse and public space. Popular taste, rather than revolutionary or national ideology, determined to a large extent what was published, with limited intervention by the French authorities. A vibrant but hierarchical public realm of debate existed in Vietnam under auhoritarian colonial rule. The work goes on to contest the impact of Confucianism on premodern and modern Vietnam and based on materials never before used, provides a radically new perspective on the rise of Vietnamese communism from 1929 to 1945. Novel interpretations of the Nghe Tinh Soviets (1930-31), the first major communist uprising in Vietnam, and Vietnamese communist successes in World War II reveal the process by which communists built an audience for their views and made an extremely alien ideology comprehensible to growing numbers of Vietnamese. In what is by far the most thorough examination in English of modern Vietnamese Buddhism and its transformations, McHale argues that, contrary to received wisdom, Buddhism was not in decline during the 1920-45 period; in fact, more Buddhist texts were produced in Vietnam at that time than at any other in its history. This finding suggests that the heritage of the Vietnamese past played a crucial role in the late colonial period. Print and Power makes a significant contribution to Vietnamese and Asian studies and will be of compelling interest to those in the fields of comparative religion and European colonialism., Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 2010, Stanford, CA Stanford University Press, 2001. Paperback First Edition Thus [2001]; First Printing indicated. First Edition Thus [2001]; First Printing indicated. Very Good+ in Wraps: shows indications of light use: the binding is very slightly cocked; light wear to the extremities; mild rubbing; a partially removed sticker at the lower rear panel; a crease near the front hinge; the binding is secure; the text is clean. No longer 'As New', but remains a clean, sturdy, presentable reading copy. NOT a Remainder, Book-Club, or Ex-Library. 8vo. 358pp. University Press Paperback. Focusing on two late-Ming or early-Qing plays central to the Chinese canon, this thought-provoking study explores crucial questions concerning personal identity. How is a person, as opposed to a ghost or animal, to be defined? How can any specific person (as distinguished, for example, from an impostor or twin) be identified? Both plays are chuanqi, representatives of a monumental genre that represents Chinese dramatic literature at its most complex: Tang Xianzu's Peony Pavilion is a romantic comedy in 55 acts, and Kong Shangren's Peach Blossom Fan narrates the fall of the Ming Dynasty in 40 acts. No reader of Chinese literature would find a sexual encounter between a young man and a female ghost surprising. In Peony Pavilion, however, the lovers actually marry and join human society—a possibility that invites speculation on the nature of personhood and agency. By contrast, Peach Blossom Fan addresses the question of identity in an explicitly political fashion. After the fall of Beijing, many men put forward imperial claims. Who, in a time of turmoil, is truly the Emperor? In a Confucian society, where hierarchy and identity are so interdependent, how does the lack of certainty about the Emperor's identity affect all human identities? The question of personal identity is intrinsically bound up with questions of agency, legal responsibility, and participation within a polity. Confucian patriarchy, in particular, implies an anxiety of identity: in order to serve one's father appropriately, one must first know who he is. Drawing on related contemporary sources, the author combines a range of perspectives, including literary criticism, philosophy, jurisprudence, and art history. This brilliant book is by far the best study in English -- and perhaps in any language -- of either of these great plays. Vital reading for anyone interested in late imperial China., Stanford University Press, 2001.

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Persons, Roles, and Minds:  Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan - Tina Lu
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Tina Lu:
Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan - signed or inscribed book

2001, ISBN: 9780804742023

Paperback, ID: 665244388

The Institute of East Asian Philosophies, 1989. xix-200 pp. Soft cover, inscribed by the author. Fine condition., Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A.: Bollingen Foundation/Princeton, 1989. 478pp including bibliography and index 69 illustrations "considers in detail various aspects of Japanese art and life that this Buddhist discipline has influenced: the cult of sworsmanship, the tea ceremony, the haiku form of poetry, and the Japanese love of nature...relationship of Zen and Confucianism, to the role of Zen in the tradition of the Samurai, and to Japanese art" . Glossy Soft Cover. Fine., Bollingen Foundation/Princeton, 1989, Stanford, CA Stanford University Press, 2001. Paperback First Edition Thus [2001]; First Printing indicated. First Edition Thus [2001]; First Printing indicated. Very Good+ in Wraps: shows indications of light use: the binding is very slightly cocked; light wear to the extremities; mild rubbing; a partially removed sticker at the lower rear panel; a crease near the front hinge; the binding is secure; the text is clean. No longer 'As New', but remains a clean, sturdy, presentable reading copy. NOT a Remainder, Book-Club, or Ex-Library. 8vo. 358pp. University Press Paperback. Focusing on two late-Ming or early-Qing plays central to the Chinese canon, this thought-provoking study explores crucial questions concerning personal identity. How is a person, as opposed to a ghost or animal, to be defined? How can any specific person (as distinguished, for example, from an impostor or twin) be identified? Both plays are chuanqi, representatives of a monumental genre that represents Chinese dramatic literature at its most complex: Tang Xianzu's Peony Pavilion is a romantic comedy in 55 acts, and Kong Shangren's Peach Blossom Fan narrates the fall of the Ming Dynasty in 40 acts. No reader of Chinese literature would find a sexual encounter between a young man and a female ghost surprising. In Peony Pavilion, however, the lovers actually marry and join human society—a possibility that invites speculation on the nature of personhood and agency. By contrast, Peach Blossom Fan addresses the question of identity in an explicitly political fashion. After the fall of Beijing, many men put forward imperial claims. Who, in a time of turmoil, is truly the Emperor? In a Confucian society, where hierarchy and identity are so interdependent, how does the lack of certainty about the Emperor's identity affect all human identities? The question of personal identity is intrinsically bound up with questions of agency, legal responsibility, and participation within a polity. Confucian patriarchy, in particular, implies an anxiety of identity: in order to serve one's father appropriately, one must first know who he is. Drawing on related contemporary sources, the author combines a range of perspectives, including literary criticism, philosophy, jurisprudence, and art history. This brilliant book is by far the best study in English -- and perhaps in any language -- of either of these great plays. Vital reading for anyone interested in late imperial China., Stanford University Press, 2001.

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Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan - Tina Lu
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Tina Lu:
Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan - Paperback

2002, ISBN: 0804742022

[SR: 805343], Paperback, [EAN: 9780804742023], Stanford University Press, Stanford University Press, Book, [PU: Stanford University Press], 2002-07-01, Stanford University Press, Focusing on two late-Ming or early-Qing plays central to the Chinese canon, this thought-provoking study explores crucial questions concerning personal identity. How is a person, as opposed to a ghost or animal, to be defined? How can any specific person (as distinguished, for example, from an impostor or twin) be identified? Both plays are chuanqi, representatives of a monumental genre that represents Chinese dramatic literature at its most complex: Tang Xianzu's Peony Pavilion is a romantic comedy in 55 acts, and Kong Shangren's Peach Blossom Fan narrates the fall of the Ming Dynasty in 40 acts. No reader of Chinese literature would find a sexual encounter between a young man and a female ghost surprising. In Peony Pavilion, however, the lovers actually marry and join human society―a possibility that invites speculation on the nature of personhood and agency. By contrast, Peach Blossom Fan addresses the question of identity in an explicitly political fashion. After the fall of Beijing, many men put forward imperial claims. Who, in a time of turmoil, is truly the Emperor? In a Confucian society, where hierarchy and identity are so interdependent, how does the lack of certainty about the Emperor's identity affect all human identities? The question of personal identity is intrinsically bound up with questions of agency, legal responsibility, and participation within a polity. Confucian patriarchy, in particular, implies an anxiety of identity: in order to serve one's father appropriately, one must first know who he is. Drawing on related contemporary sources, the author combines a range of perspectives, including literary criticism, philosophy, jurisprudence, and art hist, 10207, Criticism & Theory, 10204, History & Criticism, 17, Literature & Fiction, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 10225, Movements & Periods, 10159346011, Ancient & Classical, 10227, Arthurian Romance, 10229, Beat Generation, 10159350011, Feminist, 10243, Gothic & Romantic, 10175, LGBT, 10233, Medieval, 11764668011, Modern, 10236, Modernism, 10238, Postmodernism, 10240, Renaissance, 10159354011, Shakespeare, 10245, Surrealism, 489654, Victorian, 10204, History & Criticism, 17, Literature & Fiction, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 10159357011, Reference, 10204, History & Criticism, 17, Literature & Fiction, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 271608011, Asian, 10159359011, Chinese, 10159361011, Indian, 10159362011, Japanese, 10159358011, Regional & Cultural, 10204, History & Criticism, 17, Literature & Fiction, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 10397, Chinese, 271599011, Asian, 10311, World Literature, 17, Literature & Fiction, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books

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Persons, Roles, And Minds: Identity In peony Pavilion And peach Blossom Fan - new book

ISBN: 9780804742023

ID: 978080474202

Focusing on two late-Ming or early-Qing plays central to the Chinese canon, this thought-provoking study explores crucial questions concerning personal identity. How is a person, as opposed to a ghost or animal, to be defined? How can any specific person (as distinguished, for example, from an impostor or twin) be identified? Both plays are chuanqi, representatives of a monumental genre that represents Chinese dramatic literature at its most complex: Tang Xianzu''s Peony Pavilion is a romantic comedy in 55 acts, and Kong Shangren''s Peach Blossom Fan narrates the fall of the Ming Dynasty in 40 acts.No reader of Chinese literature would find a sexual encounter between a young man and a female ghost surprising. In Peony Pavilion, however, the lovers actually marry and join human society—a possibility that invites speculation on the nature of personhood and agency. By contrast, Peach Blossom Fan addresses the question of identity in an explicitly political fashion. After the fall of Beijing, many men put forward imperial claims. Who, in a time of turmoil, is truly the Emperor? In a Confucian society, where hierarchy and identity are so interdependent, how does the lack of certainty about the Emperor''s identity affect all human identities?The question of personal identity is intrinsically bound up with questions of agency, legal responsibility, and participation within a polity. Confucian patriarchy, in particular, implies an anxiety of identity: in order to serve one''s father appropriately, one must first know who he is. Drawing on related contemporary sources, the author combines a range of perspectives, including literary criticism, philosophy, jurisprudence, and art history. Tina Lu, Books, Fiction and Literature, Persons, Roles, And Minds: Identity In peony Pavilion And peach Blossom Fan Books>Fiction and Literature, Stanford University Press

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Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity In
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Tina Lu:
Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity In"peony Pavilion" and "Peach Blossom Fan" - Paperback

ISBN: 0804742022

[SR: 673787], Taschenbuch, [EAN: 9780804742023], Stanford Univ Pr, Stanford Univ Pr, Book, [PU: Stanford Univ Pr], Stanford Univ Pr, 67196011, Bücher & Lesen, 67197011, Antiquariat & Seltene Bücher, 67204011, Bildung, 67203011, Buchgeschichte, 67201011, Buchhandel, 67199011, Bücher sammeln, 67205011, Online-Bücher, 67208011, Schriftstellerinnen & Feministische Theorie, 66034011, Belletristik, 54071011, Genres, 52044011, Fremdsprachige Bücher, 273050011, Asiatisch, 67931011, Geschichte & Kritik, 66034011, Belletristik, 54071011, Genres, 52044011, Fremdsprachige Bücher

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Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan

No reader of Chinese literature would find a sexual encounter between a young man and a female ghost surprising. In Peony Pavilion, however, the lovers actually marry and join human society a possibility that invites speculation on the nature of personhood and agency. By contrast, Peach Blossom Fan addresses the question of identity in an explicitly political fashion. After the fall of Beijing, many men put forward imperial claims. Who, in a time of turmoil, is truly the Emperor? In a Confucian society, where hierarchy and identity are so interdependent, how does the lack of certainty about the Emperor s identity affect all human identities?

Details of the book - Persons, Roles, and Minds: Identity in Peony Pavilion and Peach Blossom Fan


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780804742023
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0804742022
Hardcover
Paperback
Publishing year: 2002
Publisher: STANFORD UNIV PR
376 Pages
Weight: 0,526 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 11.04.2007 10:34:52
Book found last time on 02.11.2017 21:35:37
ISBN/EAN: 9780804742023

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-8047-4202-2, 978-0-8047-4202-3


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