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Personal Memoirs of John H. Brinton, Major and Surgeon U.S.V., 1861-1865 (Paperback) - John H Brinton
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John H Brinton:
Personal Memoirs of John H. Brinton, Major and Surgeon U.S.V., 1861-1865 (Paperback) - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 0548507120

ID: 2771767701

[EAN: 9780548507124], Neubuch, [PU: Kessinger Publishing, United States], History|United States |Civil War Period (1850-1877), Biography & Autobiography|General, Brand New Book with Free Worldwide Delivery ***** Print on Demand *****. John Hill Brinton (1832-1907) met, observed, and commented on practically the entire hierarchy of the Union army; serving as medical director for Ulysses S. Grant, he came into contact with Philip H. Sheridan, John C. Fremont, Henry W. Halleck, William A. Hammond, D. C. Buell, John A. Rawlins, James Birdseye McPherson, C. F. Smith, John A. McClernand, William S. Rosecrans, and his first cousin George Brinton McClellan. John Y. Simon points out in his foreword that Brinton was one of the first to write about a relatively obscure Grant early in the war: "Brinton found a quiet and unassuming man smoking a pipe--he could not yet afford cigars-- and soon recognized a commander with mysterious strength of intellect and character." Positioned perfectly to observe the luminaries of the military, Brinton also occupied a unique perspective from which to comment on the wretched state of health and medicine in the Union army and on the questionable quality of medical training he found among surgeons. With both A.B. and A.M. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and postgraduate training in Paris and Vienna at a time when most medical schools required only a grammar school education, Brinton was exceptional among Civil War doctors. He found, as John S. Haller, Jr., notes in his preface, "the quality of candidates for surgeon's appointments was meager at best." As president of the Medical Examining Board, Brinton had to lower his standards at the insistence of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. Haller points out that one "self-educated candidate for an appointment as brigade surgeon explained to the board that he could do 'almost anything, from scalping an Indian, up and down.'"Brinton assigned this singular candidate to duty in Kansas "where Brinton hoped he would do the least amount of damage." Throughout the war, the dearth of qualified surgeons created problems. Brinton's memoirs reveal a remarkable Civil War surgeon, a witness to conditions in Cairo, the Battle of Belmont, and the Siege of Fort Donelson who encountered almost every Union military leader of note. Brinton wrote his memoirs for the edification of his family, not for public consumption. Yet he was, as Haller notes, a "keen observer of character." And with the exception of Brinton's acceptance of late nineteenth-century gossip favorable to his cousin General McClellan, Simon finds the memoirs "remarkable for accuracy and frankness." His portrait of Grant is vivid, and his comments on the state of medicine during the war help explain, in Haller's terms, why the "Civil War was such a medical and human tragedy." ***** Print on Demand *****.

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Personal Memoirs of John H. Brinton, Major and Surgeon U.S.V., 1861-1865 - Brinton, John H.
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Brinton, John H.:
Personal Memoirs of John H. Brinton, Major and Surgeon U.S.V., 1861-1865 - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 0548507120, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9780548507124

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: KESSINGER PUB CO, 364 Seiten, L=229mm, B=152mm, H=21mm, Gew.=531gr, [GR: 25590 - TB/Geschichte/Sonstiges], [SW: - Biography / Autobiography], Kartoniert/Broschiert John Hill Brinton (1832-1907) met, observed, and commented on practically the entire hierarchy of the Union army; serving as medical director for Ulysses S. Grant, he came into contact with Philip H. Sheridan, John C. Fremont, Henry W. Halleck, William A. Hammond, D. C. Buell, John A. Rawlins, James Birdseye McPherson, C. F. Smith, John A. McClernand, William S. Rosecrans, and his first cousin George Brinton McClellan. John Y. Simon points out in his foreword that Brinton was one of the first to write about a relatively obscure Grant early in the war: "Brinton found a quiet and unassuming man smoking a pipe--he could not yet afford cigars-- and soon recognized a commander with mysterious strength of intellect and character." Positioned perfectly to observe the luminaries of the military, Brinton also occupied a unique perspective from which to comment on the wretched state of health and medicine in the Union army and on the questionable quality of medical training he found among surgeons. With both A.B. and A.M. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and postgraduate training in Paris and Vienna at a time when most medical schools required only a grammar school education, Brinton was exceptional among Civil War doctors. He found, as John S. Haller, Jr., notes in his preface, "the quality of candidates for surgeon's appointments was meager at best." As president of the Medical Examining Board, Brinton had to lower his standards at the insistence of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. Haller points out that one "self-educated candidate for an appointment as brigade surgeon explained to the board that he could do 'almost anything, from scalping an Indian, up and down.'"Brinton assigned this singular candidate to duty in Kansas "where Brinton hoped he would do the least amount of damage." Throughout the war, the dearth of qualified surgeons created problems. Brinton's memoirs reveal a remarkable Civil War surgeon, a witness to conditions in Cairo, the Battle of Belmont, and the Siege of Fort Donelson who encountered almost every Union military leader of note. Brinton wrote his memoirs for the edification of his family, not for public consumption. Yet he was, as Haller notes, a "keen observer of character." And with the exception of Brinton's acceptance of late nineteenth-century gossip favorable to his cousin General McClellan, Simon finds the memoirs "remarkable for accuracy and frankness." His portrait of Grant is vivid, and his comments on the state of medicine during the war help explain, in Haller's terms, why the "Civil War was such a medical and human tragedy."

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Personal Memoirs of John H Brinton, Major and Surgeon U S V , 1861-1865 - John H. Brinton
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John H. Brinton:
Personal Memoirs of John H Brinton, Major and Surgeon U S V , 1861-1865 - used book

ISBN: 0548507120

ID: 15512402

John Hill Brinton (1832-1907) met, observed, and commented on practically the entire hierarchy of the Union army; serving as medical director for Ulysses S. Grant, he came into contact with Philip H. Sheridan, John C. Fremont, Henry W. Halleck, William A. Hammond, D. C. Buell, John A. Rawlins, James Birdseye McPherson, C. F. Smith, John A. McClernand, William S. Rosecrans, and his first cousin George Brinton McClellan. John Y. Simon points out in his foreword that Brinton was one of the first to write about a relatively obscure Grant early in the war: Brinton found a quiet and unassuming man smoking a pipe--he could not yet afford cigars-- and soon recognized a commander with mysterious strength of intellect and character. Positioned perfectly to observe the luminaries of the military, Brinton also occupied a unique perspective from which to comment on the wretched state of health and medicine in the Union army and on the questionable quality of medical training he found among surgeons. With both A.B. and A.M. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and postgraduate training in Paris and Vienna at a time when most medical schools required only a grammar school education, Brinton was exceptional among Civil War doctors. He found, as John S. Haller, Jr., notes in his preface, the quality of candidates for surgeon's appointments was meager at best. As president of the Medical Examining Board, Brinton had to lower his standards at the insistence of Secretary of War Edwin Stan used books,books Books, Kessinger Publishing, LLC

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Personal Memoirs of John H. Brinton, Major and Surgeon U.S.V., 1861-1865

John Hill Brinton (1832-1907) met, observed, and commented on practically the entire hierarchy of the Union army; serving as medical director for Ulysses S. Grant, he came into contact with Philip H. Sheridan, John C. Fremont, Henry W. Halleck, William A. Hammond, D. C. Buell, John A. Rawlins, James Birdseye McPherson, C. F. Smith, John A. McClernand, William S. Rosecrans, and his first cousin George Brinton McClellan. John Y. Simon points out in his foreword that Brinton was one of the first to write about a relatively obscure Grant early in the war: "Brinton found a quiet and unassuming man smoking a pipe--he could not yet afford cigars-- and soon recognized a commander with mysterious strength of intellect and character." Positioned perfectly to observe the luminaries of the military, Brinton also occupied a unique perspective from which to comment on the wretched state of health and medicine in the Union army and on the questionable quality of medical training he found among surgeons. With both A.B. and A.M. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and postgraduate training in Paris and Vienna at a time when most medical schools required only a grammar school education, Brinton was exceptional among Civil War doctors. He found, as John S. Haller, Jr., notes in his preface, "the quality of candidates for surgeon's appointments was meager at best." As president of the Medical Examining Board, Brinton had to lower his standards at the insistence of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. Haller points out that one "self-educated candidate for an appointment as brigade surgeon explained to the board that he could do 'almost anything, from scalping an Indian, up and down.'"Brinton assigned this singular candidate to duty in Kansas "where Brinton hoped he would do the least amount of damage." Throughout the war, the dearth of qualified surgeons created problems. Brinton's memoirs reveal a remarkable Civil War surgeon, a witness to conditions in Cairo, the Battle of Belmont, and the Siege of Fort Donelson who encountered almost every Union military leader of note. Brinton wrote his memoirs for the edification of his family, not for public consumption. Yet he was, as Haller notes, a "keen observer of character." And with the exception of Brinton's acceptance of late nineteenth-century gossip favorable to his cousin General McClellan, Simon finds the memoirs "remarkable for accuracy and frankness." His portrait of Grant is vivid, and his comments on the state of medicine during the war help explain, in Haller's terms, why the "Civil War was such a medical and human tragedy."

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EAN (ISBN-13): 9780548507124
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0548507120
Paperback
Publishing year: 2007
Publisher: KESSINGER PUB CO
364 Pages
Weight: 0,531 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 06.03.2008 01:58:36
Book found last time on 31.08.2017 16:05:31
ISBN/EAN: 9780548507124

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-548-50712-0, 978-0-548-50712-4


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