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Tent Of Miracles - Amado, Jorge
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Amado, Jorge:
Tent Of Miracles - signed or inscribed book

2001, ISBN: 9780394448268

Hardcover, ID: 1008852422

New York. 1971. Knopf. 1st American Edition. Very Good In Worn Dustjacket W/Some Tears & Pieces Missing.Remainder Mark On Bottom Edge & Remainder Stamp On Front Free Endpaper. 382 pages. August 1971. hardcover. Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later. Jacket design by Paul Bacon. 039444826x. keywords: 41113. inventory # 9131. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds. (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers). and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer? Like DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS, like GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, this new novel by Brazil’s most famous and beloved writer embraces the reader. in its generous, ebullient vision of earth and man. ISBN: 039444826x.

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Tent Of Miracles - Amado, Jorge
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Amado, Jorge:
Tent Of Miracles - signed or inscribed book

2001, ISBN: 9780394448268

Hardcover, ID: 1008855700

New York. 1971. Knopf. 1st American Edition. Previous Owner’s Inscription In Front, Otherwise Very Good In Slightly Worn Dustjacket. 382 pages. August 1971. hardcover. Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later. Jacket design by Paul Bacon. 039444826x. keywords: 41113. inventory # 38044. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds. (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers). and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer? Like DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS, like GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, this new novel by Brazil’s most famous and beloved writer embraces the reader. in its generous, ebullient vision of earth and man. ISBN: 039444826x.

Used Book Biblio.com
Zeno's
Shipping costs: EUR 28.54
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Tent Of Miracles - Amado, Jorge
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Amado, Jorge:
Tent Of Miracles - signed or inscribed book

2001, ISBN: 9780394448268

Hardcover, ID: 1008856262

New York. 1971. Knopf. 1st American Edition. Very Good In Dustjacket. 382 pages. August 1971. hardcover. Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later. Jacket design by Paul Bacon. 039444826x. keywords: 41338. inventory # 33633. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds. (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers). and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer? Like DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS, like GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, this new novel by Brazil’s most famous and beloved writer embraces the reader. in its generous, ebullient vision of earth and man. ISBN: 039444826x.

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Tent of Miracles - Jorge Amado
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Tent of Miracles - used book

ISBN: 039444826X

ID: 3680558

The story of Pedro Archanjo, mestizo, self-taught ethnologist, apostle of miscegenation, labourer, cult priest and bon vivant... Born in Brazil in 1912, Jorge Amado is one of Latin America's most celebrated writers. His many works include "Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands" and "Clove and Cinnamon". contemporary,fiction,literary,literary criticism,literary criticism and collections,literature and fiction Literature & Fiction, Alfred A. Knopf

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Shepherds of the Night - Amado, Jorge.
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Shepherds of the Night - used book

ISBN: 9780394448268

ID: 978579526

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Details of the book
Tent of miracles
Author:

Jorge Amado

Title:
ISBN:

Details of the book - Tent of miracles


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780394448268
ISBN (ISBN-10): 039444826X
Hardcover
Paperback
Publishing year: 2001
Publisher: Knopf

Book in our database since 30.05.2007 05:50:12
Book found last time on 19.09.2017 19:36:46
ISBN/EAN: 9780394448268

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-394-44826-X, 978-0-394-44826-8


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