. .
English
United States
Similar books
More/other books that might be very similar to this book
Search tools
Sign in
Share this book on...
Book recommendations
Latest news
Tip from find-more-books.com
Advertising
FILTER
- 0 Results
Lowest price: 22.40 €, highest price: 41.05 €, average price: 29.79 €
Bacon Is Shakespeare - Edwin Durning-Lawrence
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Edwin Durning-Lawrence:

Bacon Is Shakespeare - Paperback

ISBN: 1443774030

ID: 10533399538

[EAN: 9781443774031], Neubuch, [PU: Barman Press], EDWIN DURNING-LAWRENCE,WORLD,LETTERS AND CORRESPONDENCE, History|Historical Geography, Literary Criticism|European|English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Literary Criticism|Shakespeare, Paperback. 76 pages. Dimensions: 8.5in. x 5.5in. x 0.2in.TO THE READER. THE plays known as Shakespeares are at the present time universally acknowledged to be the Greatest birth of time, the grandest production of the human mind. Their author also is generally recognised as the greatest genius of all the ages. The more the marvclIous plays are studied, the more wonderful they arc seen to be. Classical scholars are amazed at the prodigious amount of knowledge of classical lore which they display. Lawyers declare , that their author must take rank among the greatest of lawyers, and must have been learned not only in the theory of lam, but also intimateIy acquainted with its forensic practice. In like manner, travellers feel certain that the author must have visited the foreign cities and countries tvhich he so minutely and graphically describes. It is true that at a dark period for English literature certain critics denied the possibility of Bohemia bcing accurately described as by the sea, and pointed out the manifest absurdity of speaking of the port at Milan but a wider knowledge of the actual facts have vindicated the author at the expense of his dortunate critics. It is the same with respect to othcr matters referred to in the ptays. The expert possessing special knowledge of any subject invariably discovers that the plays sliev that their author was well acquaillted with almost all that was known at the time about that particular subject. And the knowledge is so extensive and so varied that it is not too much to say that there is not a singIe living man capable of perceiving half of the learning involved in the production of the plays. One of the greatest students of law publicly declared, while he was editor of the Law Times, that although he thought that he knew sotncthing of law, yet he was not ashamed to confess that he had not sufficient legal knowledge or mental capacity to enable him to fully comprehend a quarter of the law contained in the plays. Of course, men of single Iearning, who know very little of classics and stilI less of law, do not experience any of these difficulties, because they are not able to perceive how great is the vast store of learning exhibited in the plays. There is also shewn in the plays the most perfect klowledge of Court etiquette, and of the manners and the methods of the greatest in the land, a knowledge nrhicli none but a courtier moving in the highest circles could try any possibility have acquired. In his diary, IJolfe Tone records that the French soldiers who invaded Ireland behaved exactly like the French soldiers are described as conducting themselves at Agincourt in the play of Henry V, and he exclaims, It is marvellous 1Yolfe Tonc also adds that Shakespeare could never have seen a C French soldier, but know that Bacon while in Paris had had considerable experience of them. The mighty author of the immortal plays was gifted with the most brilliant genius ever conferred upon inan. He possessed an intimate and accurate acquaintance, which could not have been artificially acquired, with all the intricacies and mysteries of Court life. He bad by study obtained nearly all the learning that could be gained frotn books. And he had by travel and experience acquired a knowledge of cities and of men that has never been surpassed. . LVho was in existence at that period who could by any possibility be supposed to be this universal genius In the days of Queen Elizabeth, for the first time in human history, one such man appeared, the man who is described as the marvel and mystery of the age, and this was the man known to us under the name of Francis Bacon. . . This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN.

New book Abebooks.de
BuySomeBooks, Las Vegas, NV, U.S.A. [52360437] [Rating: 5 (von 5)]
NEW BOOK Shipping costs: EUR 11.93
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Bacon Is Shakespeare (Paperback) - Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence
book is out-of-stock
(*)

Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence:

Bacon Is Shakespeare (Paperback) - Paperback

2008, ISBN: 1443774030

ID: 11213449280

[EAN: 9781443774031], Neubuch, [PU: Read Books, United Kingdom], History|Historical Geography, Literary Criticism|European|English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Literary Criticism|Shakespeare, Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. TO THE READER. THE plays known as Shakespeares are at the present time universally acknowledged to be the Greatest birth of time, the grandest production of the human mind. Their author also is generally recognised as the greatest genius of all the ages. The more the marvclIous plays are studied, the more wonderful they arc seen to be. Classical scholars are amazed at the prodigious amount of knowledge of classical lore which they display. Lawyers declare, that their author must take rank among the greatest of lawyers, and must have been learned not only in the theory of lam, but also intimateIy acquainted with its forensic practice. In like manner, travellers feel certain that the author must have visited the foreign cities and countries tvhich he so minutely and graphically describes. It is true that at a dark period for English literature certain critics denied the possibility of Bohemia bcing accurately described as by the sea, and pointed out the manifest absurdity of speaking of the port at Milan but a wider knowledge of the actual facts have vindicated the author at the expense of his dortunate critics. It is the same with respect to othcr matters referred to in the ptays. The expert possessing special knowledge of any subject invariably discovers that the plays sliev that their author was well acquaillted with almost all that was known at the time about that particular subject. And the knowledge is so extensive and so varied that it is not too much to say that there is not a singIe living man capable of perceiving half of the learning involved in the production of the plays. One of the greatest students of law publicly declared, while he was editor of the Law Times, that although he thought that he knew sotncthing of law, yet he was not ashamed to confess that he had not sufficient legal knowledge or mental capacity to enable him to fully comprehend a quarter of the law contained in the plays. Of course, men of single Iearning, who know very little of classics and stilI less of law, do not experience any of these difficulties, because they are not able to perceive how great is the vast store of learning exhibited in the plays. There is also shewn in the plays the most perfect klowledge of Court etiquette, and of the manners and the methods of the greatest in the land, a knowledge nrhicli none but a courtier moving in the highest circles could try any possibility have acquired. In his diary, IJolfe Tone records that the French soldiers who invaded Ireland behaved exactly like the French soldiers are described as conducting themselves at Agincourt in the play of Henry V, and he exclaims, It is marvellous 1Yolfe Tonc also adds that Shakespeare could never have seen a C French soldier, but know that Bacon while in Paris had had considerable experience of them. The mighty author of the immortal plays was gifted with the most brilliant genius ever conferred upon inan. He possessed an intimate and accurate acquaintance, which could not have been artificially acquired, with all the intricacies and mysteries of Court life. He bad by study obtained nearly all the learning that could be gained frotn books. And he had by travel and experience acquired a knowledge of cities and of men that has never been surpassed. LVho was in existence at that period who could by any possibility be supposed to be this universal genius In the days of Queen Elizabeth, for the first time in human history, one such man appeared, the man who is described as the marvel and mystery of the age, and this was the man known to us under the name of Francis Bacon.

New book Abebooks.de
The Book Depository US, London, United Kingdom [58762574] [Rating: 5 (von 5)]
NEW BOOK Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Bacon Is Shakespeare - Edwin Durning-Lawrence
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Edwin Durning-Lawrence:
Bacon Is Shakespeare - Paperback

ISBN: 9781443774031

ID: 592659246

Barman Press. Paperback. New. Paperback. 76 pages. Dimensions: 8.5in. x 5.5in. x 0.2in.TO THE READER. THE plays known as Shakespeares are at the present time universally acknowledged to be the Greatest birth of time, the grandest production of the human mind. Their author also is generally recognised as the greatest genius of all the ages. The more the marvclIous plays are studied, the more wonderful they arc seen to be. Classical scholars are amazed at the prodigious amount of knowledge of classical lore which they display. Lawyers declare , that their author must take rank among the greatest of lawyers, and must have been learned not only in the theory of lam, but also intimateIy acquainted with its forensic practice. In like manner, travellers feel certain that the author must have visited the foreign cities and countries tvhich he so minutely and graphically describes. It is true that at a dark period for English literature certain critics denied the possibility of Bohemia bcing accurately described as by the sea, and pointed out the manifest absurdity of speaking of the port at Milan but a wider knowledge of the actual facts have vindicated the author at the expense of his dortunate critics. It is the same with respect to othcr matters referred to in the ptays. The expert possessing special knowledge of any subject invariably discovers that the plays sliev that their author was well acquaillted with almost all that was known at the time about that particular subject. And the knowledge is so extensive and so varied that it is not too much to say that there is not a singIe living man capable of perceiving half of the learning involved in the production of the plays. One of the greatest students of law publicly declared, while he was editor of the Law Times, that although he thought that he knew sotncthing of law, yet he was not ashamed to confess that he had not sufficient legal knowledge or mental capacity to enable him to fully comprehend a quarter of the law contained in the plays. Of course, men of single Iearning, who know very little of classics and stilI less of law, do not experience any of these difficulties, because they are not able to perceive how great is the vast store of learning exhibited in the plays. There is also shewn in the plays the most perfect klowledge of Court etiquette, and of the manners and the methods of the greatest in the land, a knowledge nrhicli none but a courtier moving in the highest circles could try any possibility have acquired. In his diary, IJolfe Tone records that the French soldiers who invaded Ireland behaved exactly like the French soldiers are described as conducting themselves at Agincourt in the play of Henry V, and he exclaims, It is marvellous 1Yolfe Tonc also adds that Shakespeare could never have seen a C French soldier, but know that Bacon while in Paris had had considerable experience of them. The mighty author of the immortal plays was gifted with the most brilliant genius ever conferred upon inan. He possessed an intimate and accurate acquaintance, which could not have been artificially acquired, with all the intricacies and mysteries of Court life. He bad by study obtained nearly all the learning that could be gained frotn books. And he had by travel and experience acquired a knowledge of cities and of men that has never been surpassed. . LVho was in existence at that period who could by any possibility be supposed to be this universal genius In the days of Queen Elizabeth, for the first time in human history, one such man appeared, the man who is described as the marvel and mystery of the age, and this was the man known to us under the name of Francis Bacon. . . This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN., Barman Press

Used Book Biblio.com
BuySomeBooks
Shipping costs: EUR 10.99
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Bacon Is Shakespeare - Edwin Durning-lawrence
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Edwin Durning-lawrence:
Bacon Is Shakespeare - new book

ISBN: 9781443774031

ID: 978144377403

TO THE READER. THE plays known as Shakespeares are at the present time universally acknowledged to be the Greatest birth of time, the grandest production of the human mind. Their author also is generally recognised as the greatest genius of all the ages. The more the marvclIous plays are studied, the more wonderful they arc seen to be. Classical scholars are amazed at the prodigious amount of knowledge of classical lore which they display. Lawyers declare ,that their author must take rank among the greatest of lawyers, and must have been learned not only in the theory of lam, but also intimateIy acquainted with its forensic practice. In like manner, travellers feel certain that the author must have visited the foreign cities and countries tvhich he so minutely and graphically describes. It is true that at a dark period for English literature certain critics denied the possibility of Bohemia bcing accurately described as by the sea, and pointed out the manifest absurdity of speaking of the port at Milan but a wider knowledge of the actual facts have vindicated the author at the expense of his dortunate critics. It is the same with respect to othcr matters referred to in the ptays. The expert possessing special knowledge of any subject invariably discovers that the plays sliev that their author was well acquaillted with almost all that was known at the time about that particular subject. And the knowledge is so extensive and so varied that it is not too much to say that there is not a singIe living man capable of perceiving half of the learning involved in the production of the plays. One of the greatest students of law publicly declared, while he was editor of the Law Times, that although he thought that he knew sotncthing of law, yet he was not ashamed to confess that he had not sufficient legal knowledge or mental capacity to enable him to fully comprehend a quarter of the law contained in the plays. Of course, men of single Iearning, who know very little of classics and stilI less of law, do not experience any of these difficulties, because they are not able to perceive how great is the vast store of learning exhibited in the plays. There is also shewn in the plays the most perfect klowledge of Court etiquette, and of the manners and the methods of the greatest in the land, a knowledge nrhicli none but a courtier moving in the highest circles could try any possibility have acquired. In his diary, IJolfe Tone records that the French soldiers who invaded Ireland behaved exactly like the French soldiers are described as conducting themselves at Agincourt in the play of Henry V, and he exclaims, It is marvellous 1Yolfe Tonc also adds that Shakespeare could never have seen a C French soldier, but know that Bacon while in Paris had had considerable experience of them. The mighty author of the immortal plays was gifted with the most brilliant genius ever conferred upon inan. He possessed an intimate and accurate acquaintance, which could not have been artificially acquired, with all the intricacies and mysteries of Court life. He bad by study obtained nearly all the learning that could be gained frotn books. And he had by travel and experience acquired a knowledge of cities and of men that has never been surpassed.. LVho was in existence at that period who could by any possibility be supposed to be this universal genius In the days of Queen Elizabeth, for the first time in human history, one such man appeared, the man who is described as the marvel and mystery of the age, and this was the man known to us under the name of Francis Bacon... Edwin Durning-lawrence, Books, History, Bacon Is Shakespeare Books>History, Barman Press

New book Indigo.ca
new Free shipping on orders above $25 Shipping costs:plus shipping costs
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Bacon Is Shakespeare - Durning-Lawrence, Edwin
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Durning-Lawrence, Edwin:
Bacon Is Shakespeare - Paperback

ISBN: 9781443774031

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: Barman Press], TO THE READER. THE plays known as Shakespeares are at the present time universally acknowledged to be the Greatest birth of time, the grandest production of the human mind. Their author also is generally recognised as the greatest genius of all the ages. The more the marvclIous plays are studied, the more wonderful they arc seen to be. Classical scholars are amazed at the prodigious amount of knowledge of classical lore which they display. Lawyers declare ,that their author must take rank among the greatest of lawyers, and must have been learned not only in the theory of lam, but also intimateIy acquainted with its forensic practice. In like manner, travellers feel certain that the author must have visited the foreign cities and countries tvhich he so minutely and graphically describes. It is true that at a dark period for English literature certain critics denied the possibility of Bohemia bcing accurately described as by the sea, and pointed out the manifest absurdity of speaking of the port at Milan but a wider knowledge of the actual facts have vindicated the author at the expense of his dortunate critics. It is the same with respect to othcr matters referred to in the ptays. The expert possessing special knowledge of any subject invariably discovers that the plays sliev that their author was well acquaillted with almost all that was known at the time about that particular subject. And the knowledge is so extensive and so varied that it is not too much to say that there is not a singIe living man capable of perceiving half of the learning involved in the production of the plays. One of the greatest students of law publicly declared, while he was editor of the Law Times, that although he thought that he knew sotncthing of law, yet he was not ashamed to confess that he had not sufficient legal knowledge or mental capacity to enable him to fully comprehend a quarter of the law contained in the plays. Of course, men of single Iearning, who know very little of classics and stilI less of law, do not experience any of these difficulties, because they are not able to perceive how great is the vast store of learning exhibited in the plays. There is also shewn in the plays the most perfect klowledge of Court etiquette, and of the manners and the methods of the greatest in the land, a knowledge nrhicli none but a courtier moving in the highest circles could try any possibility have acquired. In his diary, IJolfe Tone records that the French soldiers who invaded Ireland behaved exactly like the French soldiers are described as conducting themselves at Agincourt in the play of Henry V, and he exclaims, It is marvellous 1Yolfe Tonc also adds that Shakespeare could never have seen a C French soldier, but know that Bacon while in Paris had had considerable experience of them. The mighty author of the immortal plays was gifted with the most brilliant genius ever conferred upon inan. He possessed an intimate and accurate acquaintance, which could not have been artificially acquired, with all the intricacies and mysteries of Court life. He bad by study obtained nearly all the learning that could be gained frotn books. And he had by travel and experience acquired a knowledge of cities and of men that has never been surpassed.. LVho was in existence at that period who could by any possibility be supposed to be this universal genius In the days of Queen Elizabeth, for the first time in human history, one such man appeared, the man who is described as the marvel and mystery of the age, and this was the man known to us under the name of Francis Bacon... Versandfertig in 3-5 Tagen, [SC: 0.00], Neuware, gewerbliches Angebot

New book Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Shipping costs:Free shipping (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.

< to search results...
Details of the book
Bacon Is Shakespeare
Author:

Durning-Lawrence, Edwin

Title:

Bacon Is Shakespeare

ISBN:

1443774030

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Details of the book - Bacon Is Shakespeare


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781443774031
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1443774030
Paperback
Publishing year: 2008
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
76 Pages
Weight: 0,109 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 24.08.2009 00:13:22
Book found last time on 24.02.2017 20:31:16
ISBN/EAN: 1443774030

ISBN - alternate spelling:
1-4437-7403-0, 978-1-4437-7403-1

< to search results...
< to archive...
Related books