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Stephen Collins Foster - Millgam, Harold Vincent
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Millgam, Harold Vincent:
Stephen Collins Foster - Paperback

2007, ISBN: 1406771708, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Shipping costs:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406771701

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 144 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=9mm, Gew.=191gr, [GR: 21600 - TB/Belletristik/Biographien, Erinnerungen], [SW: - Biography / Autobiography], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: Stephen Collins Foster A BIOGRAPHY or AMERICAS FOLK-SONG COMPOSER By Harold Fincent Milligan G. SCHIRMER NEWYORK BOSTON 1 miiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiHimmiiiiiHiiiiiiia iiioiiiiiiiniitJiililininit CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE Illustrations vi Preface vii I The Family 1 II Boyhood 13 III Youth 26 IV First Songs 39 V Ambition 54 VI Drifting 70 VII Tragedy 90 VIII The Composer 109 ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE FRONTISPIECE The Foster Homestead 11 The Old Folks at Home 34 Parents of Stephen C Foster Original Version of The Old Folks at Home 61 Photograph from the Manuscript Book Original Version of Massas in de cold, cold ground 67 Photograph from the Manuscript Book The Old Kentucky Home 72 Residence of Hon. John Rowan, near Bards town, Ky. The Last Page of the Manuscript Book SI Portrait of Stephen C. Foster 88 From the daguerreotype mentioned in the letter of June 15, 1859 Stephen Foster and George Cooper 105 After an ambrotype taken in New York in 1863 The Grave of Stephen C. Foster 108 VI PREFACE The record of scientific and material progress in America has been fairly well established, but in the fine arts we are just beginning to find ourselves, and it is important that the story of our beginnings along these lines should be gathered together and preserved. Stephen Foster occupies a unique position in the history of music, not only of this country, but of the world. No other single individual produced so many of those songs which are called folk-songs by which is meant songs that so perfectly express the mood and spirit of the people that they become a part of the life of all the folk and speak as the voice, not of an indi vidual, but of all. So completely do the folk absorb these songs and adaptthem to their own uses, that the individuality and frequently even the name of the originator is completely lost, thus giving rise to the erroneous idea that a folk-song is a song created not by an individual but by a community. It is obvious that all things must have a beginning, however obscure, and every folk-song is first born in the heart and brain of some one person, whose spirit is so finely attuned to the voice of that inward struggle which is the history of the soul of man, that when he seeks for his own self expression, he at the same time gives a voice to that vast mute multitude who die and give no sign. Such a one was Stephen Foster, more fortunate in his fate than that glorious company of nameless poet-souls, whose aspiration after the fair face of Beauty, haunting all the world is preserved in the folk-songs of the world. Surely his name is worthy of at least one volume upon the shelf of history vii viii PREFACE In addition to those names mentioned in the text, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the cooperation of others who contributed in one way or another to the compilation of the material, notably Mrs. Evelyn Foster Morneweck, of Greenville, Penn., Miss Henrietta Crosman, of New York City, Miss Rowena Hermann, of Athens, Penn., and Mr. Robert Garland and Mr. T. Carl Whitmer, both of Pittsburgh. Much valuable information as to dates and other details has been obtained from the Catalog of First Editions, compiled by Mr. Oscar G. Sonneck and Mr. Walter Whittlesey, and published by the Library of Congress. HAROLD VINCENT MILLIGAN. New York City, May, 1919. I THE FAMILY It was not a great life, as the world counts greatness. It might even be called a failure, a life sadlyout of har mony with its environment. But it has left an indelible impression on the world, and its influence, subtle, in definite, immaterial but pervasive, is incalculable. If the philosopher was right who said, If I may make the songs of a people, I care not who may make the laws, then Stephen Foster s name is worthy of remem brance... Stephen Collins Foster A BIOGRAPHY or AMERICAS FOLK-SONG COMPOSER By Harold Fincent Milligan G. SCHIRMER NEWYORK BOSTON 1 miiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiHimmiiiiiHiiiiiiia iiioiiiiiiiniitJiililininit CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE Illustrations vi Preface vii I The Family 1 II Boyhood 13 III Youth 26 IV First Songs 39 V Ambition 54 VI Drifting 70 VII Tragedy 90 VIII The Composer 109 ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE FRONTISPIECE The Foster Homestead 11 The Old Folks at Home 34 Parents of Stephen C Foster Original Version of The Old Folks at Home 61 Photograph from the Manuscript Book Original Version of Massas in de cold, cold ground 67 Photograph from the Manuscript Book The Old Kentucky Home 72 Residence of Hon. John Rowan, near Bards town, Ky. The Last Page of the Manuscript Book SI Portrait of Stephen C. Foster 88 From the daguerreotype mentioned in the letter of June 15, 1859 Stephen Foster and George Cooper 105 After an ambrotype taken in New York in 1863 The Grave of Stephen C. Foster 108 VI PREFACE The record of scientific and material progress in America has been fairly well established, but in the fine arts we are just beginning to find ourselves, and it is important that the story of our beginnings along these lines should be gathered together and preserved. Stephen Foster occupies a unique position in the history of music, not only of this country, but of the world. No other single individual produced so many of those songs which are called folk-songs by which is meant songs that so perfectly express the mood and spirit of the people that they become a part of the life of all the folk and speak as the voice, not of an indi vidual, but of all. So completely do the folk absorb these songs and adaptthem to their own uses, that the individuality and frequently even the name of the originator is completely lost, thus giving rise to the erroneous idea that a folk-song is a song created not by an individual but by a community. It is obvious that all things must have a beginning, however obscure, and every folk-song is first born in the heart and brain of some one person, whose spirit is so finely attuned to the voice of that inward struggle which is the history of the soul of man, that when he seeks for his own self expression, he at the same time gives a voice to that vast mute multitude who die and give no sign. Such a one was Stephen Foster, more fortunate in his fate than that glorious company of nameless poet-souls, whose aspiration after the fair face of Beauty, haunting all the world is preserved in the folk-songs of the world. Surely his name is worthy of at least one volume upon the shelf of history vii viii PREFACE In addition to those names mentioned in the text, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the cooperation of others who contributed in one way or another to the compilation of the material, notably Mrs. Evelyn Foster Morneweck, of Greenville, Penn., Miss Henrietta Crosman, of New York City, Miss Rowena Hermann, of Athens, Penn., and Mr. Robert Garland and Mr. T. Carl Whitmer, both of Pittsburgh. Much valuable information as to dates and other details has been obtained from the Catalog of First Editions, compiled by Mr. Oscar G. Sonneck and Mr. Walter Whittlesey, and published by the Library of Congress. HAROLD VINCENT MILLIGAN. New York City, May, 1919. I THE FAMILY It was not a great life, as the world counts greatness. It might even be called a failure, a life sadlyout of har mony with its environment. But it has left an indelible impression on the world, and its influence, subtle, in definite, immaterial but pervasive, is incalculable. If the philosopher was right who said, If I may make the songs of a people, I care not who may make the laws, then Stephen Foster s name is worthy of remem brance...

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Stephen Collins Foster - Millgam, Harold Vincent
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Millgam, Harold Vincent:
Stephen Collins Foster - Paperback

1859, ISBN: 9781406771701

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: DODO PR], Stephen Collins Foster A BIOGRAPHY or AMERICAS FOLK-SONG COMPOSER By Harold Fincent Milligan G. SCHIRMER NEWYORK BOSTON 1 miiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiHimmiiiiiHiiiiiiia iiioiiiiiiiniitJiililininit CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE Illustrations vi Preface vii I The Family 1 II Boyhood 13 III Youth 26 IV First Songs 39 V Ambition 54 VI Drifting 70 VII Tragedy 90 VIII The Composer 109 ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE FRONTISPIECE The Foster Homestead 11 The Old Folks at Home 34 Parents of Stephen C Foster Original Version of The Old Folks at Home 61 Photograph from the Manuscript Book Original Version of Massas in de cold, cold ground 67 Photograph from the Manuscript Book The Old Kentucky Home 72 Residence of Hon. John Rowan, near Bards town, Ky. The Last Page of the Manuscript Book SI Portrait of Stephen C. Foster 88 From the daguerreotype mentioned in the letter of June 15, 1859 Stephen Foster and George Cooper 105 After an ambrotype taken in New York in 1863 The Grave of Stephen C. Foster 108 VI PREFACE The record of scientific and material progress in America has been fairly well established, but in the fine arts we are just beginning to find ourselves, and it is important that the story of our beginnings along these lines should be gathered together and preserved. Stephen Foster occupies a unique position in the history of music, not only of this country, but of the world. No other single individual produced so many of those songs which are called folk-songs by which is meant songs that so perfectly express the mood and spirit of the people that they become a part of the life of all the folk and speak as the voice, not of an indi vidual, but of all. So completely do the folk absorb these songs and adaptthem to their own uses, that the individuality and frequently even the name of the originator is completely lost, thus giving rise to the erroneous idea that a folk-song is a song created not by an individual but by a community. It is obvious that all things must have a beginning, however obscure, and every folk-song is first born in the heart and brain of some one person, whose spirit is so finely attuned to the voice of that inward struggle which is the history of the soul of man, that when he seeks for his own self expression, he at the same time gives a voice to that vast mute multitude who die and give no sign. Such a one was Stephen Foster, more fortunate in his fate than that glorious company of nameless poet-souls, whose aspiration after the fair face of Beauty, haunting all the world is preserved in the folk-songs of the world. Surely his name is worthy of at least one volume upon the shelf of history vii viii PREFACE In addition to those names mentioned in the text, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the cooperation of others who contributed in one way or another to the compilation of the material, notably Mrs. Evelyn Foster Morneweck, of Greenville, Penn., Miss Henrietta Crosman, of New York City, Miss Rowena Hermann, of Athens, Penn., and Mr. Robert Garland and Mr. T. Carl Whitmer, both of Pittsburgh. Much valuable information as to dates and other details has been obtained from the Catalog of First Editions, compiled by Mr. Oscar G. Sonneck and Mr. Walter Whittlesey, and published by the Library of Congress. HAROLD VINCENT MILLIGAN. New York City, May, 1919. I THE FAMILY It was not a great life, as the world counts greatness. It might even be called a failure, a life sadlyout of har mony with its environment. But it has left an indelible impression on the world, and its influence, subtle, in definite, immaterial but pervasive, is incalculable. If the philosopher was right who said, If I may make the songs of a people, I care not who may make the laws, then Stephen Foster s name is worthy of remem brance... Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen

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Stephen Collins Foster - Millgam, Harold Vincent
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Millgam, Harold Vincent:
Stephen Collins Foster - Paperback

1859, ISBN: 9781406771701

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: DODO PR], Stephen Collins Foster A BIOGRAPHY or AMERICAS FOLK-SONG COMPOSER By Harold Fincent Milligan G. SCHIRMER NEWYORK BOSTON 1 miiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiHimmiiiiiHiiiiiiia iiioiiiiiiiniitJiililininit CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE Illustrations vi Preface vii I The Family 1 II Boyhood 13 III Youth 26 IV First Songs 39 V Ambition 54 VI Drifting 70 VII Tragedy 90 VIII The Composer 109 ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE FRONTISPIECE The Foster Homestead 11 The Old Folks at Home 34 Parents of Stephen C Foster Original Version of The Old Folks at Home 61 Photograph from the Manuscript Book Original Version of Massas in de cold, cold ground 67 Photograph from the Manuscript Book The Old Kentucky Home 72 Residence of Hon. John Rowan, near Bards town, Ky. The Last Page of the Manuscript Book SI Portrait of Stephen C. Foster 88 From the daguerreotype mentioned in the letter of June 15, 1859 Stephen Foster and George Cooper 105 After an ambrotype taken in New York in 1863 The Grave of Stephen C. Foster 108 VI PREFACE The record of scientific and material progress in America has been fairly well established, but in the fine arts we are just beginning to find ourselves, and it is important that the story of our beginnings along these lines should be gathered together and preserved. Stephen Foster occupies a unique position in the history of music, not only of this country, but of the world. No other single individual produced so many of those songs which are called folk-songs by which is meant songs that so perfectly express the mood and spirit of the people that they become a part of the life of all the folk and speak as the voice, not of an indi vidual, but of all. So completely do the folk absorb these songs and adaptthem to their own uses, that the individuality and frequently even the name of the originator is completely lost, thus giving rise to the erroneous idea that a folk-song is a song created not by an individual but by a community. It is obvious that all things must have a beginning, however obscure, and every folk-song is first born in the heart and brain of some one person, whose spirit is so finely attuned to the voice of that inward struggle which is the history of the soul of man, that when he seeks for his own self expression, he at the same time gives a voice to that vast mute multitude who die and give no sign. Such a one was Stephen Foster, more fortunate in his fate than that glorious company of nameless poet-souls, whose aspiration after the fair face of Beauty, haunting all the world is preserved in the folk-songs of the world. Surely his name is worthy of at least one volume upon the shelf of history vii viii PREFACE In addition to those names mentioned in the text, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the cooperation of others who contributed in one way or another to the compilation of the material, notably Mrs. Evelyn Foster Morneweck, of Greenville, Penn., Miss Henrietta Crosman, of New York City, Miss Rowena Hermann, of Athens, Penn., and Mr. Robert Garland and Mr. T. Carl Whitmer, both of Pittsburgh. Much valuable information as to dates and other details has been obtained from the Catalog of First Editions, compiled by Mr. Oscar G. Sonneck and Mr. Walter Whittlesey, and published by the Library of Congress. HAROLD VINCENT MILLIGAN. New York City, May, 1919. I THE FAMILY It was not a great life, as the world counts greatness. It might even be called a failure, a life sadlyout of har mony with its environment. But it has left an indelible impression on the world, and its influence, subtle, in definite, immaterial but pervasive, is incalculable. If the philosopher was right who said, If I may make the songs of a people, I care not who may make the laws, then Stephen Foster s name is worthy of remem brance... Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen

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Shipping costs:zzgl. Versand, plus shipping costs
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(*) Book out-of-stock means that the book is currently not available at any of the associated platforms we search.
Stephen Collins Foster - Millgam, Harold Vincent
book is out-of-stock
(*)
Millgam, Harold Vincent:
Stephen Collins Foster - Paperback

1859, ISBN: 9781406771701

ID: 805046178

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: Dodo Press], Stephen Collins Foster A BIOGRAPHY or AMERICAS FOLK-SONG COMPOSER By Harold Fincent Milligan G. SCHIRMER NEWYORK BOSTON 1 miiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiHimmiiiiiHiiiiiiia iiioiiiiiiiniitJiililininit CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE Illustrations vi Preface vii I The Family 1 II Boyhood 13 III Youth 26 IV First Songs 39 V Ambition 54 VI Drifting 70 VII Tragedy 90 VIII The Composer 109 ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE FRONTISPIECE The Foster Homestead 11 The Old Folks at Home 34 Parents of Stephen C Foster Original Version of The Old Folks at Home 61 Photograph from the Manuscript Book Original Version of Massas in de cold, cold ground 67 Photograph from the Manuscript Book The Old Kentucky Home 72 Residence of Hon. John Rowan, near Bards town, Ky. The Last Page of the Manuscript Book SI Portrait of Stephen C. Foster 88 From the daguerreotype mentioned in the letter of June 15, 1859 Stephen Foster and George Cooper 105 After an ambrotype taken in New York in 1863 The Grave of Stephen C. Foster 108 VI PREFACE The record of scientific and material progress in America has been fairly well established, but in the fine arts we are just beginning to find ourselves, and it is important that the story of our beginnings along these lines should be gathered together and preserved. Stephen Foster occupies a unique position in the history of music, not only of this country, but of the world. No other single individual produced so many of those songs which are called folk-songs by which is meant songs that so perfectly express the mood and spirit of the people that they become a part of the life of all the folk and speak as the voice, not of an indi vidual, but of all. So completely do the folk absorb these songs and adaptthem to their own uses, that the individuality and frequently even the name of the originator is completely lost, thus giving rise to the erroneous idea that a folk-song is a song created not by an individual but by a community. It is obvious that all things must have a beginning, however obscure, and every folk-song is first born in the heart and brain of some one person, whose spirit is so finely attuned to the voice of that inward struggle which is the history of the soul of man, that when he seeks for his own self expression, he at the same time gives a voice to that vast mute multitude who die and give no sign. Such a one was Stephen Foster, more fortunate in his fate than that glorious company of nameless poet-souls, whose aspiration after the fair face of Beauty, haunting all the world is preserved in the folk-songs of the world. Surely his name is worthy of at least one volume upon the shelf of history vii viii PREFACE In addition to those names mentioned in the text, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the cooperation of others who contributed in one way or another to the compilation of the material, notably Mrs. Evelyn Foster Morneweck, of Greenville, Penn., Miss Henrietta Crosman, of New York City, Miss Rowena Hermann, of Athens, Penn., and Mr. Robert Garland and Mr. T. Carl Whitmer, both of Pittsburgh. Much valuable information as to dates and other details has been obtained from the Catalog of First Editions, compiled by Mr. Oscar G. Sonneck and Mr. Walter Whittlesey, and published by the Library of Congress. HAROLD VINCENT MILLIGAN. New York City, May, 1919. I THE FAMILY It was not a great life, as the world counts greatness. It might even be called a failure, a life sadlyout of har mony with its environment. But it has left an indelible impression on the world, and its influence, subtle, in definite, immaterial but pervasive, is incalculable. If the philosopher was right who said, If I may make the songs of a people, I care not who may make the laws, then Stephen Foster s name is worthy of remem brance...Versandfertig in ca. 2 Wochen

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Details of the book
Stephen Collins Foster

Stephen Collins Foster A BIOGRAPHY or AMERICAS FOLK-SONG COMPOSER By Harold Fincent Milligan G. SCHIRMER NEWYORK BOSTON 1 miiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiHimmiiiiiHiiiiiiia iiioiiiiiiiniitJiililininit CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE Illustrations vi Preface vii I The Family 1 II Boyhood 13 III Youth 26 IV First Songs 39 V Ambition 54 VI Drifting 70 VII Tragedy 90 VIII The Composer 109 ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE FRONTISPIECE The Foster Homestead 11 The Old Folks at Home 34 Parents of Stephen C Foster Original Version of The Old Folks at Home 61 Photograph from the Manuscript Book Original Version of Massas in de cold, cold ground 67 Photograph from the Manuscript Book The Old Kentucky Home 72 Residence of Hon. John Rowan, near Bards town, Ky. The Last Page of the Manuscript Book SI Portrait of Stephen C. Foster 88 From the daguerreotype mentioned in the letter of June 15, 1859 Stephen Foster and George Cooper 105 After an ambrotype taken in New York in 1863 The Grave of Stephen C. Foster 108 VI PREFACE The record of scientific and material progress in America has been fairly well established, but in the fine arts we are just beginning to find ourselves, and it is important that the story of our beginnings along these lines should be gathered together and preserved. Stephen Foster occupies a unique position in the history of music, not only of this country, but of the world. No other single individual produced so many of those songs which are called folk-songs by which is meant songs that so perfectly express the mood and spirit of the people that they become a part of the life of all the folk and speak as the voice, not of an indi vidual, but of all. So completely do the folk absorb these songs and adaptthem to their own uses, that the individuality and frequently even the name of the originator is completely lost, thus giving rise to the erroneous idea that a folk-song is a song created not by an individual but by a community. It is obvious that all things must have a beginning, however obscure, and every folk-song is first born in the heart and brain of some one person, whose spirit is so finely attuned to the voice of that inward struggle which is the history of the soul of man, that when he seeks for his own self expression, he at the same time gives a voice to that vast mute multitude who die and give no sign. Such a one was Stephen Foster, more fortunate in his fate than that glorious company of nameless poet-souls, whose aspiration after the fair face of Beauty, haunting all the world is preserved in the folk-songs of the world. Surely his name is worthy of at least one volume upon the shelf of history vii viii PREFACE In addition to those names mentioned in the text, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the cooperation of others who contributed in one way or another to the compilation of the material, notably Mrs. Evelyn Foster Morneweck, of Greenville, Penn., Miss Henrietta Crosman, of New York City, Miss Rowena Hermann, of Athens, Penn., and Mr. Robert Garland and Mr. T. Carl Whitmer, both of Pittsburgh. Much valuable information as to dates and other details has been obtained from the Catalog of First Editions, compiled by Mr. Oscar G. Sonneck and Mr. Walter Whittlesey, and published by the Library of Congress. HAROLD VINCENT MILLIGAN. New York City, May, 1919. I THE FAMILY It was not a great life, as the world counts greatness. It might even be called a failure, a life sadlyout of har mony with its environment. But it has left an indelible impression on the world, and its influence, subtle, in definite, immaterial but pervasive, is incalculable. If the philosopher was right who said, If I may make the songs of a people, I care not who may make the laws, then Stephen Foster s name is worthy of remem brance...

Details of the book - Stephen Collins Foster


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406771701
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406771708
Paperback
Publishing year: 2007
Publisher: DODO PR
144 Pages
Weight: 0,191 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 04.04.2008 19:18:41
Book found last time on 05.10.2011 08:44:54
ISBN/EAN: 1406771708

ISBN - alternate spelling:
1-4067-7170-8, 978-1-4067-7170-1


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