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The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries] - John V.A. Fine, Jr
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John V.A. Fine, Jr:
The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries] - hardcover

2005, ISBN: 9780914710035

ID: 411124061

Ljubljana, 1984. Reprint. Hardcover. Very Good. A reproduction of a Protestant hymn book from 1584. Very nice condition, gilt illustration, design and title on cover, gilt title on spine. Inscription on fly-leaf, no other interior markings. Text in Slavic., 1984, U.S.A.: Macmillan. Hardcover. Very Good Red Hardcover with Very Good Mylar Protected Dust Jacket One Fine clean hardcover. Cathars, Templars, Witches, Jewish persecution by Church. Important study NOT a library book. Since 1977 we pack carefully . Very Good. 1961. First American Edition., Macmillan, 1961, Pub by Sofia Press, 1968. Hardcover, no DJ. Light cover wear, fading. Binding good, pages clean. Very Good condition., in4 Cartonné jaquette, Arthaud, 1963, Minor rubbing. VG. Bulgarian Historiography Izd. Tangra Sofija 2005 orig.wrappers 22x14cm, 135 pp. Text entirely in Bulgarian. Reflections om medieval Bulgarian religious history: Byzantium vs. Bogomilism., Izd. Tangra, 2005, Hardback. 1975. (Macedonian Heritage Collection). 128pp Skopje 1975. *Yugoslavia 272. VG in worn DW ., 1975, New York, NY Columbia University Press/East European Quarterly, 1975. Hardcover First Ed, unstated. First Ed, unstated. Near Fine: shows only the most minute indications of use: Mild rubbing has caused very faint soiling at the rear hinge; another soil but at the heel of the back-strip and a tiny spot at the upper fore-edge; else flawless. Binding square and secure; text clean. Very close to 'As New'. NOT a Remainder, Book-Club, or Ex-Library. 8vo. 447pp. Hardback: No DJ 'as issued'. Bosnia was on the boundary between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. The Croats to the West and Hungarians to the North embraced Roman Catholicism, while the Serbian lands to the east embraced Eastern Orthodoxy. No accurate figures exist as to the numbers of adherents of the two churches. The Bosnian Church coexisted uneasily with Roman Catholicism for much of the later Middle Ages. Part of the resistance of the Bosnian Church was political. During the 14th century, the Roman Church placed Bosnia under a Hungarian bishop, and the schism may have been motivated by a desire for independence from Hungarian domination. Several Bosnian rulers were Krstjani, but some of them embraced Roman Catholicism for political reasons. Outsiders accused the Bosnian Church of links to the Bogomils, a stridently dualist sect of dualist-gnostic Christians (self-entitled) heavily influenced by the Manichaean Paulician movement and also to the Patarene heresy (itself only a variant of the same belief system of Manichean-influenced dualism). The Bogomili heretics at one point mainly were centered in Bulgaria and are now known by historians as the direct lineal progenitors of the Cathari. The Inquisition reported about a dualist sect in Bosnia in the late 15th century and called them "Bosnian heretics", but this sect was according to some historians most likely not the same as the Bosnian Church. The historian Franjo Racki wrote about this in 1869 based on Latin sources but the Croatian scholar Dragutin Kniewald in 1949 established the credibility of the Latin documents in which the Bosnian Church is described as heretical. It is thought today that the Bosnian dualists, who were persecuted by both the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches, were predominantly converted to Islam thus contributing to the ethnogenesis of the modern-day Bosniaks. The Bosnian Church was dualist in character[citation needed], and so was neither a schismatic Catholic nor Orthodox Church. According to Mauro Orbini (d.1614), the Patarenes and the Manicheans. were two Christian religious sects in Bosnia. The Manicheans had a bishop called djed and priests called strojnici (strojniks), the same titles ascribed to the leaders of the Bosnian Church. The church left a few traditions by those who converted to Islam, one of which is having mosques built out of wood because many Bogomilian churches were primarily built of wood. Another tradition is having the imam stay at the grave of a deceased person which is something not found in other Islamic communities. Some historians now believe that the Bosnian Church had largely disappeared before the Turkish conquest in 1463. Other historians dispute a discrete terminal point. The religious centre of the Bosnian Church was located in Moštre, near Visoko, where the house of krstjani was founded. The Church had its own bishop and used the Slavic language in liturgy. The bishop was called djed (lit. "grandfather"), and had a council of twelve men called strojnici. The monasteries were called hiža (lit. "house"), and the heads of monasteries were often called gost (lit. "guest") and served as strojnici. The Church was mainly composed of monks in scattered monastic houses. It had no territorial organization and it did not deal with any secular matters., Columbia University Press/East European Quarterly, 1975.

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The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries]. - John V.A. Fine, Jr.
book is out-of-stock
(*)
John V.A. Fine, Jr.:
The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries]. - First edition

1975, ISBN: 0914710036

Hardcover, ID: 8604248757

[EAN: 9780914710035], [PU: Columbia University Press/East European Quarterly, New York, NY], CHURCH HISTORY EASTERN ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY ROMAN CATHOLICISM IN BOSNIA BALKAN CHRISTIAN HISTORY:, History|Europe|Eastern, First Ed, unstated. Near Fine: shows only the most minute indications of use: Mild rubbing has caused very faint soiling at the rear hinge; another soil but at the heel of the back-strip and a tiny spot at the upper fore-edge; else flawless. Binding square and secure; text clean. Very close to 'As New'. NOT a Remainder, Book-Club, or Ex-Library. 8vo. 447pp. Hardback: No DJ 'as issued'. Bosnia was on the boundary between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. The Croats to the West and Hungarians to the North embraced Roman Catholicism, while the Serbian lands to the east embraced Eastern Orthodoxy. No accurate figures exist as to the numbers of adherents of the two churches. The Bosnian Church coexisted uneasily with Roman Catholicism for much of the later Middle Ages. Part of the resistance of the Bosnian Church was political. During the 14th century, the Roman Church placed Bosnia under a Hungarian bishop, and the schism may have been motivated by a desire for independence from Hungarian domination. Several Bosnian rulers were Krstjani, but some of them embraced Roman Catholicism for political reasons. Outsiders accused the Bosnian Church of links to the Bogomils, a stridently dualist sect of dualist-gnostic Christians (self-entitled) heavily influenced by the Manichaean Paulician movement and also to the Patarene heresy (itself only a variant of the same belief system of Manichean-influenced dualism). The Bogomili heretics at one point mainly were centered in Bulgaria and are now known by historians as the direct lineal progenitors of the Cathari. The Inquisition reported about a dualist sect in Bosnia in the late 15th century and called them "Bosnian heretics", but this sect was according to some historians most likely not the same as the Bosnian Church. The historian Franjo Racki wrote about this in 1869 based on Latin sources but the Croatian scholar Dragutin Kniewald in 1949 established the credibility of the Latin documents in which the Bosnian Church is described as heretical. It is thought today that the Bosnian dualists, who were persecuted by both the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches, were predominantly converted to Islam thus contributing to the ethnogenesis of the modern-day Bosniaks. The Bosnian Church was dualist in character[citation needed], and so was neither a schismatic Catholic nor Orthodox Church. According to Mauro Orbini (d.1614), the Patarenes and the Manicheans. were two Christian religious sects in Bosnia. The Manicheans had a bishop called djed and priests called strojnici (strojniks), the same titles ascribed to the leaders of the Bosnian Church. The church left a few traditions by those who converted to Islam, one of which is having mosques built out of wood because many Bogomilian churches were primarily built of wood. Another tradition is having the imam stay at the grave of a deceased person which is something not found in other Islamic communities. Some historians now believe that the Bosnian Church had largely disappeared before the Turkish conquest in 1463. Other historians dispute a discrete terminal point. The religious centre of the Bosnian Church was located in Moštre, near Visoko, where the house of krstjani was founded. The Church had its own bishop and used the Slavic language in liturgy. The bishop was called djed (lit. "grandfather"), and had a council of twelve men called strojnici. The monasteries were called hiža (lit. "house"), and the heads of monasteries were often called gost (lit. "guest") and served as strojnici. The Church was mainly composed of monks in scattered monastic houses. It had no territorial organization and it did not deal with any secular matters.

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The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries]. - John V.A. Fine, Jr.
book is out-of-stock
(*)
John V.A. Fine, Jr.:
The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries]. - First edition

1975, ISBN: 0914710036

Hardcover, ID: 8604248757

[EAN: 9780914710035], [PU: Columbia University Press/East European Quarterly, New York, NY], CHURCH HISTORY EASTERN ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY ROMAN CATHOLICISM IN BOSNIA BALKAN CHRISTIAN HISTORY:, History|Europe|Eastern, First Ed, unstated. Near Fine: shows only the most minute indications of use: Mild rubbing has caused very faint soiling at the rear hinge; another soil but at the heel of the back-strip and a tiny spot at the upper fore-edge; else flawless. Binding square and secure; text clean. Very close to 'As New'. NOT a Remainder, Book-Club, or Ex-Library. 8vo. 447pp. Hardback: No DJ 'as issued'. Bosnia was on the boundary between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. The Croats to the West and Hungarians to the North embraced Roman Catholicism, while the Serbian lands to the east embraced Eastern Orthodoxy. No accurate figures exist as to the numbers of adherents of the two churches. The Bosnian Church coexisted uneasily with Roman Catholicism for much of the later Middle Ages. Part of the resistance of the Bosnian Church was political. During the 14th century, the Roman Church placed Bosnia under a Hungarian bishop, and the schism may have been motivated by a desire for independence from Hungarian domination. Several Bosnian rulers were Krstjani, but some of them embraced Roman Catholicism for political reasons. Outsiders accused the Bosnian Church of links to the Bogomils, a stridently dualist sect of dualist-gnostic Christians (self-entitled) heavily influenced by the Manichaean Paulician movement and also to the Patarene heresy (itself only a variant of the same belief system of Manichean-influenced dualism). The Bogomili heretics at one point mainly were centered in Bulgaria and are now known by historians as the direct lineal progenitors of the Cathari. The Inquisition reported about a dualist sect in Bosnia in the late 15th century and called them "Bosnian heretics", but this sect was according to some historians most likely not the same as the Bosnian Church. The historian Franjo Racki wrote about this in 1869 based on Latin sources but the Croatian scholar Dragutin Kniewald in 1949 established the credibility of the Latin documents in which the Bosnian Church is described as heretical. It is thought today that the Bosnian dualists, who were persecuted by both the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches, were predominantly converted to Islam thus contributing to the ethnogenesis of the modern-day Bosniaks. The Bosnian Church was dualist in character[citation needed], and so was neither a schismatic Catholic nor Orthodox Church. According to Mauro Orbini (d.1614), the Patarenes and the Manicheans. were two Christian religious sects in Bosnia. The Manicheans had a bishop called djed and priests called strojnici (strojniks), the same titles ascribed to the leaders of the Bosnian Church. The church left a few traditions by those who converted to Islam, one of which is having mosques built out of wood because many Bogomilian churches were primarily built of wood. Another tradition is having the imam stay at the grave of a deceased person which is something not found in other Islamic communities. Some historians now believe that the Bosnian Church had largely disappeared before the Turkish conquest in 1463. Other historians dispute a discrete terminal point. The religious centre of the Bosnian Church was located in Moštre, near Visoko, where the house of krstjani was founded. The Church had its own bishop and used the Slavic language in liturgy. The bishop was called djed (lit. "grandfather"), and had a council of twelve men called strojnici. The monasteries were called hiža (lit. "house"), and the heads of monasteries were often called gost (lit. "guest") and served as strojnici. The Church was mainly composed of monks in scattered monastic houses. It had no territorial organization and it did not deal with any secular matters.

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Black Cat Hill Books, Oregon City, OR, U.S.A. [37651] [Rating: 5 (of 5)]
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The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries] - John V.A. Fine, Jr
book is out-of-stock
(*)
John V.A. Fine, Jr:
The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation [A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to the 15th Centuries] - hardcover

1975, ISBN: 9780914710035

ID: 263376783

New York, NY Columbia University Press/East European Quarterly, 1975. Hardcover First Ed, unstated. First Ed, unstated. Near Fine: shows only the most minute indications of use: Mild rubbing has caused very faint soiling at the rear hinge; another soil but at the heel of the back-strip and a tiny spot at the upper fore-edge; else flawless. Binding square and secure; text clean. Very close to 'As New'. NOT a Remainder, Book-Club, or Ex-Library. 8vo. 447pp. Hardback: No DJ 'as issued'. Bosnia was on the boundary between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. The Croats to the West and Hungarians to the North embraced Roman Catholicism, while the Serbian lands to the east embraced Eastern Orthodoxy. No accurate figures exist as to the numbers of adherents of the two churches. The Bosnian Church coexisted uneasily with Roman Catholicism for much of the later Middle Ages. Part of the resistance of the Bosnian Church was political. During the 14th century, the Roman Church placed Bosnia under a Hungarian bishop, and the schism may have been motivated by a desire for independence from Hungarian domination. Several Bosnian rulers were Krstjani, but some of them embraced Roman Catholicism for political reasons. Outsiders accused the Bosnian Church of links to the Bogomils, a stridently dualist sect of dualist-gnostic Christians (self-entitled) heavily influenced by the Manichaean Paulician movement and also to the Patarene heresy (itself only a variant of the same belief system of Manichean-influenced dualism). The Bogomili heretics at one point mainly were centered in Bulgaria and are now known by historians as the direct lineal progenitors of the Cathari. The Inquisition reported about a dualist sect in Bosnia in the late 15th century and called them "Bosnian heretics", but this sect was according to some historians most likely not the same as the Bosnian Church. The historian Franjo Racki wrote about this in 1869 based on Latin sources but the Croatian scholar Dragutin Kniewald in 1949 established the credibility of the Latin documents in which the Bosnian Church is described as heretical. It is thought today that the Bosnian dualists, who were persecuted by both the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches, were predominantly converted to Islam thus contributing to the ethnogenesis of the modern-day Bosniaks. The Bosnian Church was dualist in character[citation needed], and so was neither a schismatic Catholic nor Orthodox Church. According to Mauro Orbini (d.1614), the Patarenes and the Manicheans. were two Christian religious sects in Bosnia. The Manicheans had a bishop called djed and priests called strojnici (strojniks), the same titles ascribed to the leaders of the Bosnian Church. The church left a few traditions by those who converted to Islam, one of which is having mosques built out of wood because many Bogomilian churches were primarily built of wood. Another tradition is having the imam stay at the grave of a deceased person which is something not found in other Islamic communities. Some historians now believe that the Bosnian Church had largely disappeared before the Turkish conquest in 1463. Other historians dispute a discrete terminal point. The religious centre of the Bosnian Church was located in Moštre, near Visoko, where the house of krstjani was founded. The Church had its own bishop and used the Slavic language in liturgy. The bishop was called djed (lit. "grandfather"), and had a council of twelve men called strojnici. The monasteries were called hiža (lit. "house"), and the heads of monasteries were often called gost (lit. "guest") and served as strojnici. The Church was mainly composed of monks in scattered monastic houses. It had no territorial organization and it did not deal with any secular matters., Columbia University Press/East European Quarterly, 1975.

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Bosnian Church: A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to 15th Centuries - John V., Jr.John V. Fine
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John V., Jr.John V. Fine:
Bosnian Church: A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to 15th Centuries - hardcover

ISBN: 9780914710035

ID: 9780914710035

Bosnian Church: A Study of the Bosnian Church and Its Place in State and Society from the 13th to 15th Centuries Bosnian-Church~~John-V-JrJohn-V-Fine Religion/Inspiration>Christianity>Christianity Hardcover, Eastern European Monographs

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