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The Dead Cat Bounce A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Sarah Graves
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Sarah Graves:
The Dead Cat Bounce A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Paperback

2002, ISBN: 9780553578577

Hardcover, ID: 997641635

The Palace of Holyroodhousepublished by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, Edinburgh  1968 (Third Edition, Second Impression)ISBN#: 0114900108Paperback5.1 x 7.6 inches, 32 pagesThe Palace of Holyroodhouse, commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland, Queen Elizabeth II. Located at the bottom of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, at the opposite end to Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scots since the 16th century, and is a setting for state occasions and official entertaining.Queen Elizabeth spends one week in residence at Holyrood Palace at the beginning of each summer, where she carries out a range of official engagements and ceremonies. The 16th century Historic Apartments of Mary, Queen of Scots and the State Apartments, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public throughout the year, except when members of the Royal Family are in residence.The palace as it stands today was built between 16711678 in a quadrangle layout, approximately 230 feet (70 m) from north to south and 230 feet (70 m) from east to west, with the exception of the 16th-century north-west tower built by James V. Sir William Bruce designed the 3-storey plus attic Baroque palace for Charles II, upon the restoration of the monarchy. The principal entrance is located on the west front in a recessed 2-storey range that links the 16th-century north-west tower with a matching south-west tower with three ball-finialled, conical bell-cast roofs. The entry gateway is framed by massive coupled Roman Doric columns, with the carved Royal Arms of Scotland and an octagonal cupola with clock-face above.The north and south fronts have symmetrical three-storey facades that rise behind to far left and right of 2-storey range with regular arrangement of bays. General repairs were completed by the architect Robert Reid between 18241834 that included the partial rebuilding of the south-west corner tower and refacing of the entire south front in ashlar to match that of the east. The east front has 17 pilastered bays with superimposed columns at each floor. The ruins of the abbey church connect to the palace on the north-east corner. For the internal quadrangle, Bruce designed a colonaded piazza of nine arches on the north, south and east facades superimposed with columns from the three classical orders to indicate the importance of the three main floors. The plain Doric order is used for the services at ground floor, the Ionic order is used for the state apartments on the first floor, while the elaborate Corinthian order is used for the royal apartments on the second floor.Architectural historian Dan Cruickshank selected the palace as one of his eight choices for the 2002 BBC book The Story of Britain's Best Buildings.The ruined Augustinian Holyrood Abbey that is sited in the grounds was founded in 1128 at the order of King David I of Scotland. The name derives either from a legendary vision of the cross witnessed by David I, or from a relic of the True Cross known as the Holy Rood or Black Rood, and which had belonged to Queen Margaret, David's mother. As a royal foundation, and sited close to Edinburgh Castle, it became an important administrative centre. A Papal legate was received here in 1177, while in 1189 a council of nobles met to discuss a ransom for the captive king, William the Lion. Robert the Bruce held a parliament at the abbey in 1326, and by 1329 it may already have been in use as a royal residence. In 1370, David II became the first of several Kings of Scots to be buried at Holyrood. Not only was James II born at Holyrood in 1430, it was at Holyrood that he was crowned, married and laid to rest. James III and Margaret of Denmark were married at Holyrood in 1469. The early royal residence was in the abbey guesthouse, which most likely stood on the site of the present north range of the palace, west of the abbey cloister, and by the later 15th century already had dedicated royal apartments.Between 1501 and 1505, James IV constructed a new Gothic palace adjacent to the abbey. The impetus for the work probably came from the marriage of James IV to Margaret Tudor, which took place in the abbey in August 1503 while work was still ongoing. The palace was built around a quadrangle, situated west of the abbey cloister. It contained a chapel, gallery, royal apartments, and a great hall. The chapel occupied the north range of the quadrangle, with the Queen's apartments occupying part of the south range.The west range contained the King's lodgings and the entrance to the palace. James IV also oversaw construction of a two-storey gatehouse, fragments of which survive in the Abbey Courthouse. In 1512 a lion house was constructed to house the king's menagerie, which included a lion and a civet among other exotic beasts. James V added to the palace between 1528 and 1536, beginning with the present north-west tower to provide new royal apartments. This was followed by reconstruction of the south and west ranges of the palace in the Renaissance style, with a new chapel in the south range. The former chapel in the north range was converted into the Council Chamber, where ceremonial events normally took place. The west range contained the royal library and a suite of rooms, extending the royal apartments in the tower. The symmetrical composition of the west façade suggested that a second tower at the south-west was planned, though this was never executed at the time. Around a series of lesser courts were ranged the Governor's Tower, the armoury, the mint, a forge, kitchens and other service quarters.In 1544, during the War of the Rough Wooing, the Earl of Hertford sacked Edinburgh, and Holyrood was looted and burned. Repairs were made, but the altars were destroyed by a Reforming mob in 1559. After the Scottish Reformation was formalised, the abbey buildings were neglected, and the choir and transepts of the abbey church were pulled down in 1570. The nave was retained as the parish church of the Canongate.The royal apartments in the north-west tower of the palace were occupied by Mary, Queen of Scots, from her return to Scotland in 1561 to her forced abdication in 1567. The Queen had archery butts erected in her private gardens to allow her to practice, and hunted deer in Holyrood Park. It was at Holyrood that the series of famous interviews between the Queen and John Knox took place, and she married both of her Scottish husbands in the palace: Henry Stewart, Lord Darnley, in 1565 in the chapel, and James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, in 1567 in the great hall. It was in the Queen's private apartments that she witnessed the murder of David Rizzio, her private secretary, on 9 March 1566. Darnley and several nobles entered the apartment via the private stair from Darnley's own apartments below. Bursting in on the Queen, Rizzio and four other courtiers, who were at supper, they dragged the Italian through the bedchamber into the outer chamber, where he was stabbed 56 times.During the subsequent Marian civil war, on 25 July 1571, William Kirkcaldy of Grange bombarded the Palace with cannon placed in the Black Friar Yard, near the Pleasance. James VI took up residence at Holyrood in 1579 at the age of 13 years. His wife, Anne of Denmark, was crowned in the diminished abbey church in 1590, at which time the royal household at the palace numbered around 600 persons.When James became King of England in 1603 and moved to London, the palace was no longer the seat of a permanent royal court. James visited in 1617, for which the chapel was redecorated. More repairs were put in hand in preparation for the coronation of Charles I as King of Scotland at Holyrood in 1633. On 10 August 1646 Charles appointed James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Hamilton, as hereditary Keeper of Holyroodhouse, an office which his descendants retain. The post is one of the Great Offices in the Royal Household in Scotland, and indeed the private ducal apartments cover a larger area of the palace than the state ones. As well as his own deputy, the Keeper still appoints the Bailie of Holyroodhouse, who is responsible for law and order within the Holyrood Abbey Sanctuary. The High Constables of Holyroodhouse are responsible to the Keeper.In 1650, either by accident or design, the east range of the palace was set on fire during its occupation by Oliver Cromwell's soldiers. After this, the eastern parts of the palace were effectively abandoned. The remaining parts were used as barracks, and a two-storey block was added to the west range in 1659.The following year saw the Restoration of Charles II in England and Scotland. The Privy Council was reconstituted and once more met at Holyrood. Repairs were put in hand to allow use of the building by the Earl of Lauderdale, the Secretary of State for Scotland, and a full survey was carried out in 1663 by John Mylne. In 1670, £30,000 was set aside by the Privy Council for the rebuilding of Holyrood.Plans for complete reconstruction were drawn up by Sir William Bruce, the Surveyor of the King's Works, and Robert Mylne, the King's Master Mason. The design included a south-west tower to mirror the existing tower, a plan which had existed since at least Charles I's time. Following criticism from Charles II, Bruce redesigned the interior layout to provide suites of royal apartments on the first floor: the Queen's apartment on the west side; and the King's apartment on the south and east sides. The two were linked by a gallery to the north, and a council chamber occupied the south-west tower.Work began in July 1671, starting at the north-west, which was ready for use by Lauderdale the following year. In 1675 Lord Hatton became the first of many nobles to take up a grace-and-favour apartment in the palace. The following year the decision was taken to rebuild the west range of the palace, and to construct a kitchen block to the south-east of the quadrangle. Bruce's appointment as architect of the project was cancelled in 1678, with the remaining work being overseen by Hatton. By 1679 the palace had been re-constructed, largely in its present form. Craftsmen employed included the Dutch carpenters Alexander Eizat and Jan van Santvoort, and their countryman Jacob de Wet who painted several ceilings. The elaborate plasterwork was done by John Houlbert and George Dunsterfield.Interior work was still in progress when the James, Duke of Albany, the future James VII and II, and his wife Mary of Modena visited that year. They returned to live at Holyrood between 1680 and 1682, in the aftermath of the Exclusion crisis, which had severely impacted James' popularity in England. When he acceded to the throne in 1685, the Catholic king set up a Jesuit college in the Chancellor's Lodging to the south of the palace. The abbey was adapted as a chapel for the Order of the Thistle in 168788. The architect was James Smith, and carvings were done by Grinling Gibbons and William Morgan. The interiors of this chapel, and the Jesuit college, were subsequently destroyed by an anti-Catholic mob, following the beginning of the Glorious Revolution in late 1688. In 1691 the Kirk of the Canongate was completed, to replace the abbey as the local parish church, and it is at the Kirk of the Canongate that the Queen today attends services when in residence at Holyrood Palace.After the Union of Scotland and England in 1707 the palace lost its principal functions, although it was used for the elections of Scottish representative peers. The nobles who had been granted apartments in the palace continued to use them: the Duke of Hamilton had already taken over the Queen's Apartments in 1684. The King's Apartments were meanwhile neglected.Bonnie Prince Charlie held court at Holyrood for five weeks in September and October 1745, during the Jacobite Rising. Charles occupied the Duke of Hamilton's apartments rather than the unkempt king's rooms, and held court in the Gallery. The following year, government troops were billeted in the palace after the Battle of Falkirk, when they damaged the royal portraits in the gallery, and the Duke of Cumberland stayed here on his way to Culloden. Meanwhile, the neglect continued: the roof of the abbey church collapsed in 1768, leaving it as it currently stands. However, the potential of the palace as a tourist attraction was already being recognised, with the Duke of Hamilton allowing paying guests to view Queen Mary's apartments in the north-west tower.The precincts of Holyrood Abbey, extending to the whole of Holyrood Park, had been designated as a debtors' sanctuary since the 16th century. Those in debt could escape their creditors, and imprisonment, by taking up residence within the sanctuary, and a small community grew up to the west of the palace. The residents, known colloquially as "Abbey Lairds", were able to leave the sanctuary on Sundays, when no arrests were permitted. The area was controlled by a baillie, and by several constables, appointed by the Keeper of Holyroodhouse. The constables now form a ceremonial guard at the palace.Following the French Revolution, George III allowed Louis XVI's youngest brother, the Comte d'Artois to live at Holyrood, where he took advantage of the abbey sanctuary to avoid his creditors. Artois stayed at Holyrood from 1796 to 1803, during which time the King's apartments were renovated. The Comte d'Artois inherited the French throne in 1824 as Charles X, but following the July Revolution of 1830, the French royal family lived at Holyrood again until 1832 when they moved to Austria.King George IV became the first reigning monarch since Charles I to visit Holyrood, during his 1822 visit to Scotland. Although he stayed at Dalkeith Palace, the king held a levée (reception) at Holyrood, and was shown the historic apartments. He ordered repairs to the palace, but declared that Queen Mary's rooms should be protected from any future changes. Over the next ten years, Robert Reid oversaw works including the demolition of all the buildings to the north and south of the main quadrangle. In 1834 William IV agreed that the High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland could make use of the palace during the sitting of the assembly, and this tradition continues today.On the first visit of Queen Victoria to Scotland in 1842, she also stayed at Dalkeith, and was prevented from visiting Holyrood by an outbreak of Scarlet Fever. In preparation for her 1850 visit, more renovations were carried out by Robert Matheson of the Office of Works, and the interiors were redecorated by David Ramsay Hay. Over the next few years, the lodgings of the various nobles were gradually repossessed, and Victoria was able to take up a second floor apartment in 1871, freeing up the former royal apartments as dining and drawing rooms, as well as a throne room. From 1854 the historic apartments, Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1968, New York, NY, U.S.A.: Simon & Schuster, 1996. 1st. Printing. Hard Cover. Fine/Fine. New York, NY, U.S.A.: Simon & Schuster, 1996. 1st. Printing. Fine/Fine. New York, NY, U.S.A.: Simon & Schuster, 1996. 1st. Printing. Fine/Fine. From Publishers Weekly Bestselling prognosticator Naisbitt (Megatrends 2000) predicts that the West?and even Japan?will be left behind as the countries of Southeast Asia, led by China and a collaborative network of "overseas Chinese" entrepreneurs in Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore increasingly gain economic power. The global axis of power and influence has already shifted from West to East, in his assessment, and the principal trends underlying Asia's rapid modernization include a shift from central government control to free-market economies, the emergence of female entrepreneurs, mass migration to cities and a resurgent individualistic spirit that rejects welfarism. Naisbitt, who has been based in Malaysia for more than a year, peppers this upbeat and optimistic, if shallow, report with sweeping predictions and snap analyses that seem to hit and miss their targets in equal measure. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal This latest work by mega-best-selling author Naisbitt identifies eight Asian megatrends that are reshaping our world. The number eight, considered lucky in Asia, is significant here. Coming political, economic, and cultural changes will soon render Asia the dominant region of the world, and Naisbitt offers advice that will help the reader profit by the changes. The work looks at the region as a whole. In general, things Western are falling out of favor, as key places return to Chinese rule.... read more Book Description The most momentous global development of the 1990s. The #1 bestselling author of Megatrends and Megatrends 2000 now offers a glimpse of your future that begins on the other side of the globe -- where the once isolated nations of Asia are networking into an economic colossus that will soon become a dominant force in the rest of the world. While many Americans continue to focus on Europe, the eyes on the East see a different future -- a time, five years away, when the gross national product of Asia will double Europe's, representing a third of the entire world economy. Describing the dramatic changes now underway in a rapidly modernizing Asia, John Naisbitt identifies the eight significant megatrends that characterize the region's unprecedented transformation, and that will have a profound influence on the way Asia and the West do business with each other for decades to come. A look into the future from the world's most authoritative trend forecaster, Megatrends Asia is your guide to the global shift of the world's economic, political and cultural center of gravity that will have enormous consequences for us all. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall. <br/><br/> <br/><br/>, Simon & Schuster, 1996, USA: Bantam, 1998. Mass Market Paper. Very Good. THIS OLD DEATH TRAP Since she bought her rambling old fixer-upper of a house, Jacobia Tiptree has gotten used to finding things broken. But her latest problem isn't so easily repaired. Along with the rotting floor joists and sagging support beams, there's the little matter of the dead man in Jake's storeroom, an ice pick firmly planted in his cranium. Not much happens in her tiny Maine town, but that's about to change. Jake's unknown guest turns out to be local boy turned billionaire Threnody McIlwaine. When Jake's best friend, quiet and dependable Ellie White, confesses to the murder, cops and journalists swarm into snowbound Eastport. Jake smells a cover-up, and begins poking into past history between McIlwaine and Ellie's family. But someone doesn't like nosy neighbors ... and Jake's rustic refuge may become her final resting place. ISBN 978-0-553-57857-7 06-22-16, Bantam, 1998

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The Dead Cat Bounce: A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Graves, Sarah
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Graves, Sarah:
The Dead Cat Bounce: A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Paperback

2000, ISBN: 9780553578577

Hardcover, ID: 226413442

Knopf, 1995-01-15. Hardcover. Very Good. 0679429883 First Edition. Hardcover. VG. Clean, tight and unmarked. Several wrinkles and small tear to dustjacket.From Publishers WeeklyPatterson has recycled some of the characters and one of the subplots from last year's hit, Degree of Guilt, into a new novel that can still be enjoyed without knowledge of the previous one. Young Latina lawyer Teresa Peralta, aide and lover to Degree hero Christopher Paget, is fighting to get away from creepy husband Richie Arias and take daughter Elena with her, when Richie is found dead, in what looks like murder disguised as suicide. Paget is the prime suspect, and most of the book is a detailed account of his trial. It's obvious he knows more about Arias's death than he's willing to tell, to the frustration of his brilliant defense lawyer (she was the judge in Degree). Local San Francisco politics and an accusation of child molestation against Paget's teenage son contribute to this complex brew, in which, as before, narrative skill and legal know-how take precedence over characterization and credibility. The court scenes are absorbing, covering such issues as jury selection, and the lawyerly give-and-take is convincing, but the romantic interludes fail to take wing (Paget remains a cipher throughout). Any seasoned reader will spot the murderer quite early. Still, it's a long, luxuriant read that is also refreshingly free of gratuitous violence. 250,000 first printing; author tour; Literary Guild selection; simultaneous release in large-print edition and as Random House Audiobook.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.From Library JournalLawyer Patterson's bloated sequel to his best-selling courtroom novel, Degree of Guilt (LJ 12/92), is already slated for television. His new work could have been cut in half by any diligent editor-30 pages of jury selection, for instance, is enough to glaze the eyes of the most dedicated crime reader. The intense dialog and plot, however, will grab fans of Scott Turow and John Grisham, and Patterson gives readers a convincing look at San Francisco's corrupt politics. The plot concerns the death of ne'er-do-well Ricardo Arias, who may or may not have committed suicide. Because of the widely publicized custody battle waged with Arias by his ex-wife and her lover, Christopher Paget (hero of Degree of Guilt), both are investigated and Paget indicted. The author's deeply felt antiviolence theme is smoothly integrated into the narrative. Expect demand.--Joyce Smothers, Monmouth Cty. Lib., Manalapan, N.J.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.From BooklistPatterson's Degree of Guilt (1992) was a runaway best-seller, so it's a good bet his latest will generate reader enthusiasm, big sales, and media hype, too. There's no doubt it's a page-turner. Despite the shallow morality and severe case of yuppie-itis affecting the main characters, the book has all the right stuff for commercial success: illicit affairs, sex and lust, murder, child molestation, a cute kid, and a gripping courtroom scene. Terri Peralta and Richie Arias have been married for six years, but the only good thing they have to show for the union is their daughter, Elena. Now Terri has left Richie and fallen in love with her lawyer-boss, Chris Paget; meanwhile, Richie, a manipulative slimeball capable of deceptive charm, convinces the judge he's a caring father who should have custody of Elena. Terri, devastated, goes off to Italy with Chris to decide if they really love each other. When they return, Richie is dead, supposedly a suicide. Of course, the police have doubts, and the ensuing trial, where Chris must defend himself against murder charges, is the book's main event. Wicked crossfire in the courtroom and a surprise ending make this one entertaining, but by no means great literature. Of course, with a 250,000-copy first printing and a national advertising campaign, who needs literature? Emily MeltonFrom Kirkus ReviewsAbout the only trauma San Francisco superlawyer Christopher Paget was spared in his previous appearance (Degree of Guilt, 1993) was being put on trial for murder himself--an omission Patterson rectifies here when Chris is charged with killing the estranged husband of his associate and lover, Teresa Peralta. It hasn't been easy for Terri to leave Richie Arias, despite his manipulative irresponsibility. As the child of an abusive marriage herself, she worries that she'll never really be free of him, especially since he's ready to use threats about their five- year-old daughter, Elena, to force her to give up Chris. As Terri stumbles through Elena's custody hearings, charming, sociopathic Richie polishes his image for the psychologists and judges, extorts spiraling alimony and child support payments, sells his story to a scummy tabloid, and finally sues Chris's adored son, Carlo, for molesting Elena. Desperate Terri, watching the deadline for Carlo's hearing loom, wishes Richie were dead--and then suddenly he is, leaving her and Chris in even hotter water. The police have Chris's fingerprints at Richie's apartment, an eyewitness who saw him leaving the scene, and what looks like a clumsy attempt to stage an alibi. Chris's lawyer, Caroline Masters (the judge in the Carelli trial in Degree of Guilt), has to make do with a wacky suicide theory nobody believes, Chris's refusal to take the stand himself, and a killer instinct for the weak spots in each witness's testimony. The trial is a tour de force that will keep you holding your breath for 200 pages, but the most cunningly prepared surprises--foreshadowed by a psychologist's persistent therapy with an unresponsive Elena--don't come until after the verdict is in. Patterson's new thriller is a miracle of agonizingly focused suspense. The adversarial nature of American criminal justice has never been more brilliantly dramatized. (First printing of 250,000; Literary Guild main selection; author tour) -- Copyright ?1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights, Knopf, 1995-01-15, Audioworks, 2000-02-01. Audio Cassette. Very Good. 0671784706 Review Catherine Ryan Hyde's Pay It Forward takes as its premise the bumper-sticker phrase "Think Globally, Act Locally" and builds a novel around it. The hero of her story is young Trevor McKinney, a 12-year-old whose imagination is sparked by an extra-credit assignment in Social Studies: "Think of an idea for world change, and put it into action." Trevor's idea is deceptively simple: do a good deed for three people, and in exchange, ask each of them to "pay it forward" to three more. "So nine people get helped. Then those people have to do twenty-seven.... Then it sort of spreads out." Trevor's early attempts to get his project off the ground seem to end in failure: a junkie he befriends ends up back in jail; an elderly woman whose garden he tends dies unexpectedly. But even after the boy has given up on his plan, his acts of kindness bear unexpected fruit, and soon an entire movement is underway and spreading across America. Trevor, meanwhile, could use a little help himself. His father walked out on the family, and his mother, Arlene, is fighting an uphill battle with alcoholism, poor judgment in men, and despair. When the boy's new Social Studies teacher, Reuben St. Clair, arrives on the scene, Trevor sees in him not only a source of inspiration for how to change the world, but also the means of altering his mother's life. Yet Reuben has his own set of problems. Horribly scarred in Vietnam, he is reluctant to open himself up to the possibility of rejection--or love. Indeed, the relationship between Arlene and Reuben is central to the novel as these two damaged people learn to "pay forward" the trust and affection Trevor has given them. Hyde tells her tale from many different perspectives, using letters, diary entries, and first- and third-person narratives from the various people whose lives Trevor's project touches. Jerry Busconi, for example, the addict Trevor tried to help, one night finds himself talking a young woman out of jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge: I'm a junkie, Charlotte. I'm always gonna be a junkie. I ain't never gonna be no fine, upstanding citizen. But then I thought, hell. Just pay it forward anyway. Kid tried to help me. Okay, it didn't work. Still, I'm trying to help you. Maybe you'll jump. I don't know. But I tried, right? But let me tell you one thing. I woke up one morning and somebody gave me a chance. Just outta nowhere. It was like a miracle. Now, how do you know that won't happen to you tomorrow? Pay It Forward is reminiscent of Frank Capra's classic It's a Wonderful Life. Like the film, this novel has a steely core of gritty reality beneath its optimism: yes, one person can make a difference, can help to make the world a better place, but sickness, pain, heartache, and tragedy will still always be a part of the human condition. If at times Hyde stumbles a bit while negotiating the razor-thin line between honest feeling and sentimentality, it's generally not for long. And the occasional lapse into artificially colored emotion can be forgiven when weighed against the courage it takes to write so unabashedly hopeful a story in such cynical times. --Sheila Bright --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From Publishers Weekly An ordinary boy engineers a secular miracle in Hyde's (Funerals for Horses) winning second novel, set in small-town 1990s California. Twelve-year-old Trevor McKinney, the son of Arlene, a single mom working two jobs, and Ricky, a deadbeat absentee dad, does not seem well-positioned to revolutionize the world. But when Trevor's social studies teacher, Reuben St. Clair, gives the class an extra-credit assignment, challenging his students to design a plan to change society, Trevor decides to start a goodwill chain. To begin, he helps out three people, telling each of them that instead of paying him back, they must "pay it forward" by helping three others. At first, nothing seems to work out as planned, not even Trevor's attempt to bring Arlene and Reuben together. Granted, Trevor's mother and his teacher are an unlike, Audioworks, 2000-02-01, Bantam, 1998-09-01. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good. 055357857X Amazon Review This Old House meets Murder, She Wrote in this Sarah Graves mystery set on the coast of Maine. Jacobia Triptree, onetime financial advisor to the Mob, finds her quiet retreat shattered by the unwelcome discovery of a dead man in the Victorian pile she is in the midst of restoring. That he has an ice pick in his forehead only confirms her suspicion that the death was brought about by something other than natural causes. When her closest friend, Ellie, confesses to having done the deed, Jacobia is convinced she is lying and determines to save Ellie from herself by finding the real killer. The victim turns out to be a local boy who'd done well enough to be featured in the pages of Fortune magazine. Ellie's ostensible reason for her uncharacteristic violence is that he bankrupted her parents. Between bouts of waterproofing the basement and replacing floor joists, Jacobia sets out to find a more believable motive and murderer. The mystery itself is not that complicated, and as Jacobia digs deeper under her house and into the past, the truth eventually surfaces. Graves sufficiently amuses, however, with delightful characterizations of Jacobia's former connections and the local heroes who assist her in her projects of rescuing Ellie and putting her house together. Jake's asides regarding the stock market, as well as the details of home restoration, also provoke the occasional smile. Graves is at her best delineating the tension between the small town's good guys and the federal investigators (and tourists) from far away. A gentle read, despite the shadow of the Mafia, and entertaining enough for bedtime diversion. --K.A. Crouch From Publishers Weekly With the advent of amateur sleuth Jacobia Tiptree, Eastport, Maine, could become as deadly as Cabot Cove. Having left the daily grind of her job as a financial adviser in New York, Jake, as she is known to her friends, has settled in an old house in Eastport with her teenage son, Sam, away from her annoying ex-husband, the brain surgeon. When Jake discovers a dead man in her storeroom, an ice pick stuck in his head, her tranquillity is up-ended. Her friend and neighbor, Ellie White, starts acting strangely and then confesses to murdering the man, one Threnody McIlwaine, an old friend of Ellie's father and a ruthless corporate raider. Jake is quickly convinced that Ellie is protecting someone?perhaps her vicious mother or her father, who was ruined by McIlwaine?and despite threats to her own well-being continues nosing into the dead man's past. In her polished debut, Graves blends charming, evocative digressions about life in Eastport with an intricate plot, well-drawn characters and a wry sense of humor. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc., Bantam, 1998-09-01

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The Dead Cat Bounce: A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Graves, Sarah
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The Dead Cat Bounce: A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Paperback

2000, ISBN: 9780553578577

Hardcover, ID: 327141275

New York: Magnum, 1968. Mass Market Paperback. Good. 351 pages; spine creasing, edge wear, ex-library with usual markings; Stimulating, thought-provoking utopian fantasy about a young man who's put into a hypnotic trance in the late 19th century and awakens in the year 2000 to find crime, war, and want nonexistent., Magnum, 1968, New York: Magnum, 1968. Mass Market Paperback. Good. 351 pages; spine creasing, edge wear; Stimulating, thought-provoking utopian fantasy about a young man who's put into a hypnotic trance in the late 19th century and awakens in the year 2000 to find crime, war, and want nonexistent., Magnum, 1968, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1983-02-12. Book Club. Hardcover. Good/Good. some light foxing to page ends, boards slightly curled out of square, some edge wear; jacket has edge wear and two significant tears, one on lower front edge, one on the spine. John le Carre's classic novels deftly navegate readers through the intricate shadow worlds of international espionage with unsurpassed skill and knowledge, and have earned him unprecedented worldwide acclaim. In this thrilling and thought-provoking novel of Middle Eastern intrigue, Charlie, a brilliant and beautiful young English actress, is lured into "the theatre of the real" by an Israeli intelligence officer. Forced to play her ultimate role, she is plunged into a deceptive and delicate trap set to ensnare an elusive Palestinian terrorist., Alfred A. Knopf, 1983-02-12, Harpercollins, 1989-10-01. Hardcover. Good. 0060162619 Ex-Library in mylar. From Library Journal Kiam is best known as "The Man Who Bought the Company," since he acquired and revitalized Remington. In Going for It ( LJ 4/15/86), Kiam described his experiences while providing practical guidelines for would-be entrepreneurs. This latest book continues Kiam's story after the Remington revitalization and underlines the fact that the company has grown and "refused to become complacent." Kiam also chronicles his past experiences as an entrepreneur and uses these to counsel future entrepreneurs on ways to achievement in business and avoidance of the potential pitfalls. He provides some valuable insights, notably the importance of individual honesty and integrity in the business world as well as the sharing of experiences with family. A thought-provoking and informative book, recommended to public library business collections. - Lucy Heckman, St. John's Univ., Jamaica, New York Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc., Harpercollins, 1989-10-01, Bantam, 1998-09-01. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good. 055357857X Amazon Review This Old House meets Murder, She Wrote in this Sarah Graves mystery set on the coast of Maine. Jacobia Triptree, onetime financial advisor to the Mob, finds her quiet retreat shattered by the unwelcome discovery of a dead man in the Victorian pile she is in the midst of restoring. That he has an ice pick in his forehead only confirms her suspicion that the death was brought about by something other than natural causes. When her closest friend, Ellie, confesses to having done the deed, Jacobia is convinced she is lying and determines to save Ellie from herself by finding the real killer. The victim turns out to be a local boy who'd done well enough to be featured in the pages of Fortune magazine. Ellie's ostensible reason for her uncharacteristic violence is that he bankrupted her parents. Between bouts of waterproofing the basement and replacing floor joists, Jacobia sets out to find a more believable motive and murderer. The mystery itself is not that complicated, and as Jacobia digs deeper under her house and into the past, the truth eventually surfaces. Graves sufficiently amuses, however, with delightful characterizations of Jacobia's former connections and the local heroes who assist her in her projects of rescuing Ellie and putting her house together. Jake's asides regarding the stock market, as well as the details of home restoration, also provoke the occasional smile. Graves is at her best delineating the tension between the small town's good guys and the federal investigators (and tourists) from far away. A gentle read, despite the shadow of the Mafia, and entertaining enough for bedtime diversion. --K.A. Crouch From Publishers Weekly With the advent of amateur sleuth Jacobia Tiptree, Eastport, Maine, could become as deadly as Cabot Cove. Having left the daily grind of her job as a financial adviser in New York, Jake, as she is known to her friends, has settled in an old house in Eastport with her teenage son, Sam, away from her annoying ex-husband, the brain surgeon. When Jake discovers a dead man in her storeroom, an ice pick stuck in his head, her tranquillity is up-ended. Her friend and neighbor, Ellie White, starts acting strangely and then confesses to murdering the man, one Threnody McIlwaine, an old friend of Ellie's father and a ruthless corporate raider. Jake is quickly convinced that Ellie is protecting someone?perhaps her vicious mother or her father, who was ruined by McIlwaine?and despite threats to her own well-being continues nosing into the dead man's past. In her polished debut, Graves blends charming, evocative digressions about life in Eastport with an intricate plot, well-drawn characters and a wry sense of humor. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc., Bantam, 1998-09-01

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The Dead Cat Bounce: A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Graves, Sarah
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The Dead Cat Bounce: A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery - Paperback

1998, ISBN: 9780553578577

ID: 264487982

Bantam, 1998-09-01. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good. 055357857X Amazon Review This Old House meets Murder, She Wrote in this Sarah Graves mystery set on the coast of Maine. Jacobia Triptree, onetime financial advisor to the Mob, finds her quiet retreat shattered by the unwelcome discovery of a dead man in the Victorian pile she is in the midst of restoring. That he has an ice pick in his forehead only confirms her suspicion that the death was brought about by something other than natural causes. When her closest friend, Ellie, confesses to having done the deed, Jacobia is convinced she is lying and determines to save Ellie from herself by finding the real killer. The victim turns out to be a local boy who'd done well enough to be featured in the pages of Fortune magazine. Ellie's ostensible reason for her uncharacteristic violence is that he bankrupted her parents. Between bouts of waterproofing the basement and replacing floor joists, Jacobia sets out to find a more believable motive and murderer. The mystery itself is not that complicated, and as Jacobia digs deeper under her house and into the past, the truth eventually surfaces. Graves sufficiently amuses, however, with delightful characterizations of Jacobia's former connections and the local heroes who assist her in her projects of rescuing Ellie and putting her house together. Jake's asides regarding the stock market, as well as the details of home restoration, also provoke the occasional smile. Graves is at her best delineating the tension between the small town's good guys and the federal investigators (and tourists) from far away. A gentle read, despite the shadow of the Mafia, and entertaining enough for bedtime diversion. --K.A. Crouch From Publishers Weekly With the advent of amateur sleuth Jacobia Tiptree, Eastport, Maine, could become as deadly as Cabot Cove. Having left the daily grind of her job as a financial adviser in New York, Jake, as she is known to her friends, has settled in an old house in Eastport with her teenage son, Sam, away from her annoying ex-husband, the brain surgeon. When Jake discovers a dead man in her storeroom, an ice pick stuck in his head, her tranquillity is up-ended. Her friend and neighbor, Ellie White, starts acting strangely and then confesses to murdering the man, one Threnody McIlwaine, an old friend of Ellie's father and a ruthless corporate raider. Jake is quickly convinced that Ellie is protecting someone?perhaps her vicious mother or her father, who was ruined by McIlwaine?and despite threats to her own well-being continues nosing into the dead man's past. In her polished debut, Graves blends charming, evocative digressions about life in Eastport with an intricate plot, well-drawn characters and a wry sense of humor. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc., Bantam, 1998-09-01

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The Dead Cat Bounce - Sarah Graves
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The Dead Cat Bounce - new book

ISBN: 9780553578577

ID: 620525571

Jacobia ´´Jake´´ Tiptree left her investment job in New York to remodel a 200-year-old home is Eastport, Maine. But she has scarcely begun to spackle when she wonders if her new life is any improvement on her old: there´s a dead body in her storeroom. Now, Jake must crack the identity of a cold-blooded killer--and still make time for lobster culling and home improvement. A Home Repair is Homicide Mystery Buch (fremdspr.) Bücher>Fremdsprachige Bücher>Englische Bücher>Krimis & Thriller>Mystery, Bantam Dell

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The Dead Cat Bounce

Jacobia "Jake" Tiptree left her investment job in New York to remodel a 200-year-old home is Eastport, Maine. But she has scarcely begun to spackle when she wonders if her new life is any improvement on her old: there's a dead body in her storeroom. Now, Jake must crack the identity of a cold-blooded killer--and still make time for lobster culling and home improvement.

Details of the book - The Dead Cat Bounce


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780553578577
ISBN (ISBN-10): 055357857X
Hardcover
Paperback
Publishing year: 1998
Publisher: BANTAM DELL
336 Pages
Weight: 0,163 kg
Language: eng/Englisch

Book in our database since 26.06.2007 15:59:18
Book found last time on 09.01.2018 22:11:35
ISBN/EAN: 055357857X

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-553-57857-X, 978-0-553-57857-7


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