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Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - P. D. James
book is out-of-stock
(*)
P. D. James:

Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - Paperback

2003, ISBN: 9780375412554

Hardcover, ID: 326886767

New York: Bantam Books, 1969. Mass Market Paperback. Good. 238 pages; Bantam Critical Edition NC4134; spine creasing, edge wear, some notes inside cover; In HEART OF DARKNESS, Conrad's most existential hero, Marlow, is the commander of a riverboat looking for ivory to trade in the Belgian Congo. His journey into the heart of the Congo is both a thrilling adventure and a symbolic excursion into the depths of the human psyche to confront the evil that exists there. Marlow's encounter with the mysterious and corrupted Kurtz, who dies proclaiming the "horror" of what he found in the Congo, is the novel's defining moment, when Marlow recognizes his kinship with Kurtz's corruption. This insight enables Marlow to retreat from Kurtz's world and return to England. Kurtz, in his attempts to reconcile his noble ideas with his greed, can't survive. "The Secret Sharer," one of Conrad's most celebrated stories, is about a ship's captain and his murderous double, Bantam Books, 1969, New York, New York, U.S.A.: Critics Choice Paperbacks/Lorevan Publishing, Incorporated, 1985. Mass Market Paperback. Fair., Critics Choice Paperbacks/Lorevan Publishing, Incorporated, 1985, Paperback. Good. ISBN 0-451-19170-6, New York: Audioworks, 1998. Not Indicated. Audio Cassettes. Very Good. (Abridged Stories) (4 Audio Cassettes) - Since 1997 delivering quality books to our neighbors, all around the world!, Audioworks, 1998, Paperback. Very Good. ISBN 0-515-12648-9, Simon & Schuster. Spiral: The most compelling and disturbing thriller since Silence Of The Lambs For six years, Nicholas Greer has been working on a biography of the late British painter, Frank Spira. Then comes the call that changes his life forever. Former art critic Barb Segal informs Nick that she's just bumped into Spira's ex-lover, Jacob Grossman: who disappeared in 1972 and has never been seen since-until now. When Nick tracks him down in New York, Grossman mentions a mysterious painting, The Incarnation, which Spira was alleged to have painted in Tangier in the late 1950s. If it really exists, this painting would be worth over USD 6 million. An hour after this meeting, Grossman is brutally murdered. A prime suspect in the ensuing police investigation, Nick's only hope of proving his innocence is to find out the truth about the painting. What exactly happened in Tangier in 1957? And just who is the sinister Collector who seems to be shadowing Nick? The truth about Spira's elusive masterpiece is more horrific, more shocking than Nick could ever have imagined. Debut novel. Black cloth covered hardback with gilt lettering to spine in fine condition. Pictorial dustwrapper unclipped in very good condition. Slight wrinkle to front cover. . Fine. Cloth Black. 2003., Simon & Schuster, 2003, F. Ungar Pub Co, 1978 Hard Cover. 3. Very Good in Very Good jacket Ex-Library. 8vo-over 7?"-9?" tall. null., F. Ungar Pub Co, 1978, Fawcett Crest, 2003-08-26. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good -. Very Good Minus.FREE Media Mail Shipping on all U.S. orders over $ 25.00, Fawcett Crest, 2003-08-26, London, United Kingdom: Howard Baker, 1969. Hardcover with price clipped dust jacket, 246 pages, plus Preface, Introduction and Foreword; only tiny traces of shelf wear,, very clean and unmarked throughout, all pages fresh and white; DJ rubbed, two very tiny chips.. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good ++/Very Good -., Howard Baker, 1969, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10. Hardcover. Very Good. 0375412557 Editorial Reviews 's Best of 2001 Despite challenges from Ruth Rendell and (more recently) Minette Walters, P.D. James's position as Britain's Queen of Crime remains largely unassailable. Although a certain reaction has set in to her reputation (and there are those who claim her poetry-loving copper Adam Dalgliesh doesn't correspond to any of his counterparts in the real world), her detractors can scarcely deny her astonishing literary gifts. More than any other writer, she has elevated the detective story into the realms of literature, with the psychology of the characters treated in the most complex and authoritative fashion. Her plots, too, are full of intriguing detail and studed with brilliantly observed character studies. Who cares if Dalgliesh belongs more in the pages of a book than poking around a graffiti-scrawled council estate? As a policeman, he is considerably more plausible than Doyle's Holmes, and that's never stopped us loving the Baker Street sleuth. Death in Holy Orders represents something of a challenge from James to her critics, taking on all the contentious elements and rigorously reinvigorating them. She had admitted that she was finding it increasingly difficult to find new plots for Dalgliesh, and the locale here (a theological college on a lonely stretch of the East Anglian coast) turns out to be an inspired choice. We're presented with the enclosed setting so beloved of golden age detective writers, and James is able to incorporate her theological interests seamlessly into the plot (but never in any doctrinaire way; the nonbeliever is never uncomfortable). The body of a student at the college is found on the shore, suffocated by a fall of sand. Dalgliesh is called upon to reexamine the verdict of accidental death (which the student's father would not accept). Having visited the College of St. Anselm in his boyhood, he finds the investigation has a strong nostalgic aspect for him. But that is soon overtaken by the realization that he has encountered the most horrific case of his career, and another visitor to the college dies a horrible death. As an exploration of evil--and as a piece of highly distinctive crime writing--this is James at her nonpareil best. Dalgliesh, too, is rendered with new dimensions of psychological complexity. --Barry Forshaw, Amazon.co.uk From Publishers Weekly Baroness James may have turned 80, but neither she nor her dogged Scotland Yard detective Commander Adam Dalgliesh (last seen in 1997's A Certain Justice) shows any sign of flagging in this superb whodunit, with its extraordinarily complex and nuanced plot and large cast of credible characters. When the body of a young ordinand, Ronald Treeves, turns up buried in a sandy bank on the Suffolk coast near isolated St. Anselm's, a High Anglican theological college, it's unclear whether his death was an accident, suicide or murder. The mystery deepens a few days later when someone suffocates Margaret Munroe, a retired nurse with a bad heart, because she remembers an event 12 years earlier that could have some bearing on whatever's amiss at St. Anselm's. Enter Dalgliesh at the behest of Ronald's father, Sir Alred, who's received an anonymous note suggesting foul play in his son's death. It isn't long before another death occurs, and this time it's clearly murder: late one night in the chapel, somebody bashes in the head of Archdeacon Crampton, a hard-nosed outsider who wanted to close St. Anselm's. Dalgliesh and his investigative team examine the complicated motives of a host of suspects resident at the college, mostly ordinands and priests, slowly unveiling the connections among the various deaths. Illegitimacy, incest, a secret marriage, a missing cloak and a valuable altar triptych are just some of the ingredients in a case as contrived as any Golden Age classic but presented with such masterful ease and conviction that even the most skeptical readers will suspend disbelief. This is a natural for PBS Mystery adaptation. (Apr. 19)Forecast: With a 300,000-copy first printing, this BOMC main selection is sure to race up the bestseller lists. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal A Victorian mansion situated on a lonely cliff along the English coast. Guests, welcome and unwelcome, gathered for a long weekend. A dark and stormy night. A shocking murder in a locked room. James combines all the elements of the classic English detective story in her first Adam Dalgliesh mystery since A Certain Justice (LJ 11/1/97). Asked by a wealthy businessman to investigate the "accidental" death of his adopted son Ronald, a student at a small theological college in East Anglia, Dalgliesh willingly returns to St. Anselm's, where he had spent happy summers as a teenager. But what was a casual investigation turns into official police business when the archdeacon, another weekend visitor, is found brutally murdered in the locked church. Is his killing related to Ronald's death or to the recent fatal "heart attack" of the housekeeper who discovered Ronald's body? Or was the archdeacon murdered because he threatened to close the college down? In their usual methodical and careful manner, Dagliesh and his team, Detective Inspectors Kate Miskin and Piers Tarrant, seek answers and a murderer. Despite the too-obvious red herrings and plot contrivances, this is still an enjoyable read to be savored on chilly evenings with a cup of hot tea. - Wilda Williams, "Library Journal" Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. From The New Yorker This engrossing, almost consoling whodunit is a classic closed-box mystery: almost everything happens behind the closed doors of St. Anselm's, a small Anglican theological college set on a windy cliff abutting the sea. Commander Adam Dalgliesh, as always both wistful and stern, returns to St. Anselm's, where he spent a few blissful boyhood summers, to investigate the death of a student, but the case quickly expands as bodies begin to fall like so many dominoes. It's a pleasure to read James at the top of her form, as she often is here, especially when she's delineating the differences between supposedly like-minded souls, but this time around the d?, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10

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Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - P. D. James
book is out-of-stock
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P. D. James:

Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - First edition

2001, ISBN: 9780375412554

Paperback, Hardcover, ID: 109891272

New York: Putnam Adult. Hardcover. 2000-01-01. 1st Edition. Very Good. Stated 1st ed. Tight and clean. Sharp corners and edges. Dust jacket has mi nor wear. Previous owner's name written on front endpage. Otherwise this is a like new copy. Patricia Cornwell's legendary crime fiction creation, Virginia's Chief Medi cal Examiner Kay Scarpetta, has logged a host of fans among mystery readers and, within the bounds of her fictional world, an equally impressive tally of individuals intent on causing her grievous physical or psychological ha rm. The 11th Scarpetta novel, The Last Precinct, doesn't add any new names to t he second roster. Instead, in a sweeping narrative gesture toward retrospec tion (less-than-fervent fans might whisper "or stagnation"), the novel depe nds largely on ground already covered in its predecessors, Black Notice and , to a lesser extent, Point of Origin. All the familiar faces--friend and f oe--are here: police captain Marino, Kay's niece Lucy, the so-called Werewo lf murderer, and (in memoriam) Kay's lover Benton Wesley and his killer, Ca rrie Grethen. Kay, who nearly killed the Werewolf in self-defense as Black Notice came to a close, now finds herself the target of a corrupt police in vestigation that will dredge her darkest secrets from the deepest corners o f her past. Torn between a desire to clear her name and the instinct of a wounded animal to turn against even its would-be rescuers, Kay sifts through the forensic evidence that seems to link Chandonne to other horrific events in her past, up to and including Wesley's murder. Physical analysis, however, will not be enough to right her up-ended world. Instead, Kay must rely on the strategic support of her niece, cofounder ., Putnam Adult, 2000-01-01, Worldwide Library. Good+. 1981. Paperback. The spine and both covers, next to the spine, are creased from reading. The pages are clean, no tears or soiling. The pages and binding are tight. All three page edges are yellow stained. ; Raven House Mysteries; Vol. 70; 16mo 6" - 7" tall; 218 pages; A thirty-something junk-food maven and brash, brainy Berkeley cop, Jill Smith usually doesn't spend much time contemplating her navel. But she accepted an invitation to see the new guru in town. She was as shocked as the rest of the packed house when the young man's spirit rose to heaven before their very eyes . . . With a little earthly aid from the dagger buried deep in his swirling red robes. His followers say it was his karma to die. Now Jill Smith's seeking enlightenment-looking deep into prime causes such as love, hate, ambition, and dark dreams. Among a host of devoted disciples, rough real-estate dealers, rival soul savers, and beautiful consorts, she's searching for the answer to a cop's prayers: the person whose karma is to kill. It was the best part of town to buy dreams. But the prices were highway robbery-your money or your life! Will combine shipping on more than one book. ., Worldwide Library, 1981, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10. Hardcover. Very Good. 0375412557 Editorial Reviews 's Best of 2001 Despite challenges from Ruth Rendell and (more recently) Minette Walters, P.D. James's position as Britain's Queen of Crime remains largely unassailable. Although a certain reaction has set in to her reputation (and there are those who claim her poetry-loving copper Adam Dalgliesh doesn't correspond to any of his counterparts in the real world), her detractors can scarcely deny her astonishing literary gifts. More than any other writer, she has elevated the detective story into the realms of literature, with the psychology of the characters treated in the most complex and authoritative fashion. Her plots, too, are full of intriguing detail and studed with brilliantly observed character studies. Who cares if Dalgliesh belongs more in the pages of a book than poking around a graffiti-scrawled council estate? As a policeman, he is considerably more plausible than Doyle's Holmes, and that's never stopped us loving the Baker Street sleuth. Death in Holy Orders represents something of a challenge from James to her critics, taking on all the contentious elements and rigorously reinvigorating them. She had admitted that she was finding it increasingly difficult to find new plots for Dalgliesh, and the locale here (a theological college on a lonely stretch of the East Anglian coast) turns out to be an inspired choice. We're presented with the enclosed setting so beloved of golden age detective writers, and James is able to incorporate her theological interests seamlessly into the plot (but never in any doctrinaire way; the nonbeliever is never uncomfortable). The body of a student at the college is found on the shore, suffocated by a fall of sand. Dalgliesh is called upon to reexamine the verdict of accidental death (which the student's father would not accept). Having visited the College of St. Anselm in his boyhood, he finds the investigation has a strong nostalgic aspect for him. But that is soon overtaken by the realization that he has encountered the most horrific case of his career, and another visitor to the college dies a horrible death. As an exploration of evil--and as a piece of highly distinctive crime writing--this is James at her nonpareil best. Dalgliesh, too, is rendered with new dimensions of psychological complexity. --Barry Forshaw, Amazon.co.uk From Publishers Weekly Baroness James may have turned 80, but neither she nor her dogged Scotland Yard detective Commander Adam Dalgliesh (last seen in 1997's A Certain Justice) shows any sign of flagging in this superb whodunit, with its extraordinarily complex and nuanced plot and large cast of credible characters. When the body of a young ordinand, Ronald Treeves, turns up buried in a sandy bank on the Suffolk coast near isolated St. Anselm's, a High Anglican theological college, it's unclear whether his death was an accident, suicide or murder. The mystery deepens a few days later when someone suffocates Margaret Munroe, a retired nurse with a bad heart, because she remembers an event 12 years earlier that could have some bearing on whatever's amiss at St. Anselm's. Enter Dalgliesh at the behest of Ronald's father, Sir Alred, who's received an anonymous note suggesting foul play in his son's death. It isn't long before another death occurs, and this time it's clearly murder: late one night in the chapel, somebody bashes in the head of Archdeacon Crampton, a hard-nosed outsider who wanted to close St. Anselm's. Dalgliesh and his investigative team examine the complicated motives of a host of suspects resident at the college, mostly ordinands and priests, slowly unveiling the connections among the various deaths. Illegitimacy, incest, a secret marriage, a missing cloak and a valuable altar triptych are just some of the ingredients in a case as contrived as any Golden Age classic but presented with such masterful ease and conviction that even the most skeptical readers will suspend disbelief. This is a natural for PBS Mystery adaptation. (Apr. 19)Forecast: With a 300,000-copy first printing, this BOMC main selection is sure to race up the bestseller lists. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal A Victorian mansion situated on a lonely cliff along the English coast. Guests, welcome and unwelcome, gathered for a long weekend. A dark and stormy night. A shocking murder in a locked room. James combines all the elements of the classic English detective story in her first Adam Dalgliesh mystery since A Certain Justice (LJ 11/1/97). Asked by a wealthy businessman to investigate the "accidental" death of his adopted son Ronald, a student at a small theological college in East Anglia, Dalgliesh willingly returns to St. Anselm's, where he had spent happy summers as a teenager. But what was a casual investigation turns into official police business when the archdeacon, another weekend visitor, is found brutally murdered in the locked church. Is his killing related to Ronald's death or to the recent fatal "heart attack" of the housekeeper who discovered Ronald's body? Or was the archdeacon murdered because he threatened to close the college down? In their usual methodical and careful manner, Dagliesh and his team, Detective Inspectors Kate Miskin and Piers Tarrant, seek answers and a murderer. Despite the too-obvious red herrings and plot contrivances, this is still an enjoyable read to be savored on chilly evenings with a cup of hot tea. - Wilda Williams, "Library Journal" Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. From The New Yorker This engrossing, almost consoling whodunit is a classic closed-box mystery: almost everything happens behind the closed doors of St. Anselm's, a small Anglican theological college set on a windy cliff abutting the sea. Commander Adam Dalgliesh, as always both wistful and stern, returns to St. Anselm's, where he spent a few blissful boyhood summers, to investigate the death of a student, but the case quickly expands as bodies begin to fall like so many dominoes. It's a pleasure to read James at the top of her form, as she often is here, especially when she's delineating the differences between supposedly like-minded souls, but this time around the d?, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10

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Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - P. D. James
book is out-of-stock
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P. D. James:
Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - Paperback

2008

ISBN: 9780375412554

Hardcover, ID: 694364695

New York: Del Rey, 2003-11-04. Mass Market Paperback. Good. 588 pages; spine creasing, light edge wear; Five centuries after the destruction of the Mages of Alasea, a young girl, Elena, inherits the wild powers the Mages had so carefully concealed from their pitiless enemy. But though the Mages are long dead their ancient foe is not - and Elena must continue their battle with her hard-won outlaw army and her own mastery of the blood magick. Elena and her forces had defeated evil in an audacious attack, a wound cut deep into the Black Heart, but this isn't enough. The Dark Lord's greatest weapon, the Weirgates, continue their ravenous onslaught and the land's powers wane. The Elementals, those rare folk tuned to the Land's energy, are sickening, their abilities fading. The Mer'ai are losing their sea sense and the link to their dragons and the Elv'in ships can not fly as high or far...Now an ally dies in violence, whispering of a last betrayal and a stranger foretells victory or the death of all., Del Rey, 2003-11-04, Aphrodisia. As New with no dust jacket. 2008. Softcover. 9780758221803 . Book is as new, tight and clean inside and out. ; Elementals, Book 2 ., Aphrodisia, 2008, Aphrodisia. PAPERBACK. 0758221800 Good Condition. A few pages have crinkling. Five star seller - Buy with confidence! . Good., Aphrodisia, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10. Hardcover. Very Good. 0375412557 Editorial Reviews 's Best of 2001 Despite challenges from Ruth Rendell and (more recently) Minette Walters, P.D. James's position as Britain's Queen of Crime remains largely unassailable. Although a certain reaction has set in to her reputation (and there are those who claim her poetry-loving copper Adam Dalgliesh doesn't correspond to any of his counterparts in the real world), her detractors can scarcely deny her astonishing literary gifts. More than any other writer, she has elevated the detective story into the realms of literature, with the psychology of the characters treated in the most complex and authoritative fashion. Her plots, too, are full of intriguing detail and studed with brilliantly observed character studies. Who cares if Dalgliesh belongs more in the pages of a book than poking around a graffiti-scrawled council estate? As a policeman, he is considerably more plausible than Doyle's Holmes, and that's never stopped us loving the Baker Street sleuth. Death in Holy Orders represents something of a challenge from James to her critics, taking on all the contentious elements and rigorously reinvigorating them. She had admitted that she was finding it increasingly difficult to find new plots for Dalgliesh, and the locale here (a theological college on a lonely stretch of the East Anglian coast) turns out to be an inspired choice. We're presented with the enclosed setting so beloved of golden age detective writers, and James is able to incorporate her theological interests seamlessly into the plot (but never in any doctrinaire way; the nonbeliever is never uncomfortable). The body of a student at the college is found on the shore, suffocated by a fall of sand. Dalgliesh is called upon to reexamine the verdict of accidental death (which the student's father would not accept). Having visited the College of St. Anselm in his boyhood, he finds the investigation has a strong nostalgic aspect for him. But that is soon overtaken by the realization that he has encountered the most horrific case of his career, and another visitor to the college dies a horrible death. As an exploration of evil--and as a piece of highly distinctive crime writing--this is James at her nonpareil best. Dalgliesh, too, is rendered with new dimensions of psychological complexity. --Barry Forshaw, Amazon.co.uk From Publishers Weekly Baroness James may have turned 80, but neither she nor her dogged Scotland Yard detective Commander Adam Dalgliesh (last seen in 1997's A Certain Justice) shows any sign of flagging in this superb whodunit, with its extraordinarily complex and nuanced plot and large cast of credible characters. When the body of a young ordinand, Ronald Treeves, turns up buried in a sandy bank on the Suffolk coast near isolated St. Anselm's, a High Anglican theological college, it's unclear whether his death was an accident, suicide or murder. The mystery deepens a few days later when someone suffocates Margaret Munroe, a retired nurse with a bad heart, because she remembers an event 12 years earlier that could have some bearing on whatever's amiss at St. Anselm's. Enter Dalgliesh at the behest of Ronald's father, Sir Alred, who's received an anonymous note suggesting foul play in his son's death. It isn't long before another death occurs, and this time it's clearly murder: late one night in the chapel, somebody bashes in the head of Archdeacon Crampton, a hard-nosed outsider who wanted to close St. Anselm's. Dalgliesh and his investigative team examine the complicated motives of a host of suspects resident at the college, mostly ordinands and priests, slowly unveiling the connections among the various deaths. Illegitimacy, incest, a secret marriage, a missing cloak and a valuable altar triptych are just some of the ingredients in a case as contrived as any Golden Age classic but presented with such masterful ease and conviction that even the most skeptical readers will suspend disbelief. This is a natural for PBS Mystery adaptation. (Apr. 19)Forecast: With a 300,000-copy first printing, this BOMC main selection is sure to race up the bestseller lists. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal A Victorian mansion situated on a lonely cliff along the English coast. Guests, welcome and unwelcome, gathered for a long weekend. A dark and stormy night. A shocking murder in a locked room. James combines all the elements of the classic English detective story in her first Adam Dalgliesh mystery since A Certain Justice (LJ 11/1/97). Asked by a wealthy businessman to investigate the "accidental" death of his adopted son Ronald, a student at a small theological college in East Anglia, Dalgliesh willingly returns to St. Anselm's, where he had spent happy summers as a teenager. But what was a casual investigation turns into official police business when the archdeacon, another weekend visitor, is found brutally murdered in the locked church. Is his killing related to Ronald's death or to the recent fatal "heart attack" of the housekeeper who discovered Ronald's body? Or was the archdeacon murdered because he threatened to close the college down? In their usual methodical and careful manner, Dagliesh and his team, Detective Inspectors Kate Miskin and Piers Tarrant, seek answers and a murderer. Despite the too-obvious red herrings and plot contrivances, this is still an enjoyable read to be savored on chilly evenings with a cup of hot tea. - Wilda Williams, "Library Journal" Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. From The New Yorker This engrossing, almost consoling whodunit is a classic closed-box mystery: almost everything happens behind the closed doors of St. Anselm's, a small Anglican theological college set on a windy cliff abutting the sea. Commander Adam Dalgliesh, as always both wistful and stern, returns to St. Anselm's, where he spent a few blissful boyhood summers, to investigate the death of a student, but the case quickly expands as bodies begin to fall like so many dominoes. It's a pleasure to read James at the top of her form, as she often is here, especially when she's delineating the differences between supposedly like-minded souls, but this time around the d?, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10

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Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - P. D. James
book is out-of-stock
(*)
P. D. James:
Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - Paperback

2001, ISBN: 9780375412554

Hardcover, ID: 102422395

New York, New York, U.S.A.: Bantam Books, 1981. Very Good. No Jacket 12mo-over 6¾"-7¾" tall. Light shelf wear. Solid copy with clean pages.. First Printing. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good/No Jacket. Book., Bantam Books, 1981, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10. Hardcover. Very Good. 0375412557 Editorial Reviews 's Best of 2001 Despite challenges from Ruth Rendell and (more recently) Minette Walters, P.D. James's position as Britain's Queen of Crime remains largely unassailable. Although a certain reaction has set in to her reputation (and there are those who claim her poetry-loving copper Adam Dalgliesh doesn't correspond to any of his counterparts in the real world), her detractors can scarcely deny her astonishing literary gifts. More than any other writer, she has elevated the detective story into the realms of literature, with the psychology of the characters treated in the most complex and authoritative fashion. Her plots, too, are full of intriguing detail and studed with brilliantly observed character studies. Who cares if Dalgliesh belongs more in the pages of a book than poking around a graffiti-scrawled council estate? As a policeman, he is considerably more plausible than Doyle's Holmes, and that's never stopped us loving the Baker Street sleuth. Death in Holy Orders represents something of a challenge from James to her critics, taking on all the contentious elements and rigorously reinvigorating them. She had admitted that she was finding it increasingly difficult to find new plots for Dalgliesh, and the locale here (a theological college on a lonely stretch of the East Anglian coast) turns out to be an inspired choice. We're presented with the enclosed setting so beloved of golden age detective writers, and James is able to incorporate her theological interests seamlessly into the plot (but never in any doctrinaire way; the nonbeliever is never uncomfortable). The body of a student at the college is found on the shore, suffocated by a fall of sand. Dalgliesh is called upon to reexamine the verdict of accidental death (which the student's father would not accept). Having visited the College of St. Anselm in his boyhood, he finds the investigation has a strong nostalgic aspect for him. But that is soon overtaken by the realization that he has encountered the most horrific case of his career, and another visitor to the college dies a horrible death. As an exploration of evil--and as a piece of highly distinctive crime writing--this is James at her nonpareil best. Dalgliesh, too, is rendered with new dimensions of psychological complexity. --Barry Forshaw, Amazon.co.uk From Publishers Weekly Baroness James may have turned 80, but neither she nor her dogged Scotland Yard detective Commander Adam Dalgliesh (last seen in 1997's A Certain Justice) shows any sign of flagging in this superb whodunit, with its extraordinarily complex and nuanced plot and large cast of credible characters. When the body of a young ordinand, Ronald Treeves, turns up buried in a sandy bank on the Suffolk coast near isolated St. Anselm's, a High Anglican theological college, it's unclear whether his death was an accident, suicide or murder. The mystery deepens a few days later when someone suffocates Margaret Munroe, a retired nurse with a bad heart, because she remembers an event 12 years earlier that could have some bearing on whatever's amiss at St. Anselm's. Enter Dalgliesh at the behest of Ronald's father, Sir Alred, who's received an anonymous note suggesting foul play in his son's death. It isn't long before another death occurs, and this time it's clearly murder: late one night in the chapel, somebody bashes in the head of Archdeacon Crampton, a hard-nosed outsider who wanted to close St. Anselm's. Dalgliesh and his investigative team examine the complicated motives of a host of suspects resident at the college, mostly ordinands and priests, slowly unveiling the connections among the various deaths. Illegitimacy, incest, a secret marriage, a missing cloak and a valuable altar triptych are just some of the ingredients in a case as contrived as any Golden Age classic but presented with such masterful ease and conviction that even the most skeptical readers will suspend disbelief. This is a natural for PBS Mystery adaptation. (Apr. 19)Forecast: With a 300,000-copy first printing, this BOMC main selection is sure to race up the bestseller lists. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal A Victorian mansion situated on a lonely cliff along the English coast. Guests, welcome and unwelcome, gathered for a long weekend. A dark and stormy night. A shocking murder in a locked room. James combines all the elements of the classic English detective story in her first Adam Dalgliesh mystery since A Certain Justice (LJ 11/1/97). Asked by a wealthy businessman to investigate the "accidental" death of his adopted son Ronald, a student at a small theological college in East Anglia, Dalgliesh willingly returns to St. Anselm's, where he had spent happy summers as a teenager. But what was a casual investigation turns into official police business when the archdeacon, another weekend visitor, is found brutally murdered in the locked church. Is his killing related to Ronald's death or to the recent fatal "heart attack" of the housekeeper who discovered Ronald's body? Or was the archdeacon murdered because he threatened to close the college down? In their usual methodical and careful manner, Dagliesh and his team, Detective Inspectors Kate Miskin and Piers Tarrant, seek answers and a murderer. Despite the too-obvious red herrings and plot contrivances, this is still an enjoyable read to be savored on chilly evenings with a cup of hot tea. - Wilda Williams, "Library Journal" Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. From The New Yorker This engrossing, almost consoling whodunit is a classic closed-box mystery: almost everything happens behind the closed doors of St. Anselm's, a small Anglican theological college set on a windy cliff abutting the sea. Commander Adam Dalgliesh, as always both wistful and stern, returns to St. Anselm's, where he spent a few blissful boyhood summers, to investigate the death of a student, but the case quickly expands as bodies begin to fall like so many dominoes. It's a pleasure to read James at the top of her form, as she often is here, especially when she's delineating the differences between supposedly like-minded souls, but this time around the d?, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001-04-10

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Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - James, P. D.
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Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11) - used book

2001, ISBN: 9780375412554

ID: 113622538

Alfred A. Knopf. Bookclub Edition. 0375412557 9.5 x 6.6 x 1.4 inches 's Best of 2001 Despite challenges from Ruth Rendell and (more recently) Minette Walters, P.D. James's position as Britain's Queen of Crime remains largely unassailable. Although a certain reaction has set in to her reputation (and there are those who claim her poetry-loving copper Adam Dalgliesh doesn't correspond to any of his counterparts in the real world), her detractors can scarcely deny her astonishing literary gifts. More than any other writer, she has elevated the detective story into the realms of literature, with the psychology of the characters treated in the most complex and authoritative fashion. Her plots, too, are full of intriguing detail and studed with brilliantly observed character studies. Who cares if Dalgliesh belongs more in the pages of a book than poking around a graffiti-scrawled council estate? As a policeman, he is considerably more plausible than Doyle's Holmes, and that's never stopped us loving the Baker Street sleuth. Death in Holy Orders represents something of a challenge from James to her critics, taking on all the contentious elements and rigorously reinvigorating them. She had admitted that she was finding it increasingly difficult to find new plots for Dalgliesh, and the locale here (a theological college on a lonely stretch of the East Anglian coast) turns out to be an inspired choice. We're presented with the enclosed setting so beloved of golden age detective writers, and James is able to incorporate her theological interests seamlessly into the plot (but never in any doctrinaire way; the nonbeliever is never uncomfortable). The body of a student at the college is found on the shore, suffocated by a fall of sand. Dalgliesh is called upon to reexamine the verdict of accidental death (which the student's father would not accept). Having visited the College of St. Anselm in his boyhood, he finds the investigation has a strong nostalgic aspect for him. But that is soon overtaken by the realization that he has encountered the most horrific case of his career, and another visitor to the college dies a horrible death. As an exploration of evil--and as a piece of highly distinctive crime writing--this is James at her nonpareil best. Dalgliesh, too, is rendered with new dimensions of psychological complexity. --Barry Forshaw, Amazon.co.uk From Publishers Weekly Baroness James may have turned 80, but neither she nor her dogged Scotland Yard detective Commander Adam Dalgliesh (last seen in 1997's A Certain Justice) shows any sign of flagging in this superb whodunit, with its extraordinarily complex and nuanced plot and large cast of credible characters. When the body of a young ordinand, Ronald Treeves, turns up buried in a sandy bank on the Suffolk coast near isolated St. Anselm's, a High Anglican theological college, it's unclear whether his death was an accident, suicide or murder. The mystery deepens a few days later when someone suffocates Margaret Munroe, a retired nurse with a bad heart, because she remembers an event 12 years earlier that could have some bearing on whatever's amiss at St. Anselm's. Enter Dalgliesh at the behest of Ronald's father, Sir Alred, who's received an anonymous note suggesting foul play in his son's death. It isn't long before another death occurs, and this time it's clearly murder: late one night in the chapel, somebody bashes in the head of Archdeacon Crampton, a hard-nosed outsider who wanted to close St. Anselm's. Dalgliesh and his investigative team examine the complicated motives of a host of suspects resident at the college, mostly ordinands and priests, slowly unveiling the connections among the various deaths. Illegitimacy, incest, a secret marriage, a missing cloak and a valuable altar triptych are just some of the ingredients in a case as contrived as any Golden Age classic but presented with such masterful ease and conviction that even the most skeptical readers will suspend disbelief. This is a natural for PBS Mystery adaptation. (Apr. 19)Forecast: With a 300,000-copy first printing, this BOMC main selection is sure to race up the . Fine. 2001., Alfred A. Knopf, 2001

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Details of the book
Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11)
Author:

P. D. James

Title:

Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11)

ISBN:

0375412557

Details of the book - Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11)


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780375412554
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0375412557
Hardcover
Paperback
Publishing year: 2001
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf

Book in our database since 06.11.2007 21:23:00
Book found last time on 01.01.2017 19:28:47
ISBN/EAN: 0375412557

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-375-41255-7, 978-0-375-41255-4

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