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Inside Picture Books - SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD)
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SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD):

Inside Picture Books - signed or inscribed book

2012, ISBN: 9780300076028

Paperback, Hardcover, ID: 436292196

Viva Books, 2010. First edition. Softcover. New. Both comprehensive and compact, Beginning film studies is a much needed introduction to the study of film, combining depth with clarity and scholarship with a lightness of touch. Written with verve and wit, it charts for new readers to the field the complex landscape of twentieth and twenty-first century film studies. As well as evaluating significant trends in the discipline’s past and present, it suggests directions for film studies in the future when cinema will increasingly be challenged by other forms of visual culture. Beginning film studies is wide-ranging, moving outwards from detailed consideration of film stylistics to explore questions of narrative authorship, genre, the start and ideology. Later chapters on production and consumption assess the discipline’s recent ‘geographical’ turn. Discussion is illustrated by references to film cultures as diverse as classical Hollywood, the French ‘New Wave’ and contemporary Hong Kong, India and Latin America; more than a little is said about Johnny Deep. The book is interactive throughout, with the reader encouraged to reflect critically upon each chapter’s theories and methods and to apply these to his or her film viewing. Comprehensive lists of secondary reading and online materials make Beginning film studies the ideal resource for students keen to enter this dynamic subject. Contents: Introduction: what are film studies? • From magic lanterns to videogames • About this book • Seeing film: mise-en-scène analysis • Defining mise-en-scène • Pro-filmic elements of mise-en-scène • Cinematography • Colour and its meanings • Analysing mise-en-scène: In the Mood for Love • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film editing: theories and histories • Beyond the shot • Principles and practices of continuity editing • Continuity editing and its discontents • Montage(s) • Meanings of the jump cut • Analysing editing: Strike and Matewan • Selected reading • Useful websites • Hearing film: analysing soundtracks • Deafening silents • Sound and fury • Terminologies of sound analysis • Music for films • Analysing soundtrack: Le Mépris • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and narrative • Russian Formalists at the cinema • Time and motion pictures • The sense of an ending • Narrative and power • Analysing narrative: 21 Grams • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and authorship • Auteur studies: Cahiers du cinéma and other journals • The problems of auteurism • The rebirth of the author • Digital auteurs • Analysing authorship: David Lynch • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and genre • Taxonomies of film genre • Threads, prisms, maps • Generic communities or, the strange case of the cycling film • Genres and history • The end of genre? • Analysing genre: the high school movie • Selected reading • Useful websites • Star studies • Political economies of film stardom • The making and meaning of star personas • Seeing stars • National and transnational stars • Tiger, not James,Woods • Analysing stars: Johnny Depp • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and ideology • Class struggle – and the struggle for class – in film studies • A very short history of gender in film studies • Queering cinema • Unthinking racism in film studies • Analysing ideology: Far From Heaven • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film production • Hollywood • Beyond Hollywood: two examples • National and transnational film • Analysing production: In This World • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film consumption • Places and experiences • Cinema before cinemas • Spaces of cinemagoing • Home looking • Analysing consumption: Metro Cinema, Derby • Selected reading • Useful websites • Conclusion: film studies in the digital age • Selected reading • Useful websites • Further reading • Online resources • Index Printed Pages: 368., Viva Books, 2010, Viva Books, 2010. First edition. Softcover. New. Both comprehensive and compact, Beginning film studies is a much needed introduction to the study of film, combining depth with clarity and scholarship with a lightness of touch. Written with verve and wit, it charts for new readers to the field the complex landscape of twentieth and twenty-first century film studies. As well as evaluating significant trends in the discipline’s past and present, it suggests directions for film studies in the future when cinema will increasingly be challenged by other forms of visual culture. Beginning film studies is wide-ranging, moving outwards from detailed consideration of film stylistics to explore questions of narrative authorship, genre, the start and ideology. Later chapters on production and consumption assess the discipline’s recent ‘geographical’ turn. Discussion is illustrated by references to film cultures as diverse as classical Hollywood, the French ‘New Wave’ and contemporary Hong Kong, India and Latin America; more than a little is said about Johnny Deep. The book is interactive throughout, with the reader encouraged to reflect critically upon each chapter’s theories and methods and to apply these to his or her film viewing. Comprehensive lists of secondary reading and online materials make Beginning film studies the ideal resource for students keen to enter this dynamic subject. Contents: Introduction: what are film studies? • From magic lanterns to videogames • About this book • Seeing film: mise-en-scène analysis • Defining mise-en-scène • Pro-filmic elements of mise-en-scène • Cinematography • Colour and its meanings • Analysing mise-en-scène: In the Mood for Love • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film editing: theories and histories • Beyond the shot • Principles and practices of continuity editing • Continuity editing and its discontents • Montage(s) • Meanings of the jump cut • Analysing editing: Strike and Matewan • Selected reading • Useful websites • Hearing film: analysing soundtracks • Deafening silents • Sound and fury • Terminologies of sound analysis • Music for films • Analysing soundtrack: Le Mépris • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and narrative • Russian Formalists at the cinema • Time and motion pictures • The sense of an ending • Narrative and power • Analysing narrative: 21 Grams • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and authorship • Auteur studies: Cahiers du cinéma and other journals • The problems of auteurism • The rebirth of the author • Digital auteurs • Analysing authorship: David Lynch • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and genre • Taxonomies of film genre • Threads, prisms, maps • Generic communities or, the strange case of the cycling film • Genres and history • The end of genre? • Analysing genre: the high school movie • Selected reading • Useful websites • Star studies • Political economies of film stardom • The making and meaning of star personas • Seeing stars • National and transnational stars • Tiger, not James,Woods • Analysing stars: Johnny Depp • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film and ideology • Class struggle – and the struggle for class – in film studies • A very short history of gender in film studies • Queering cinema • Unthinking racism in film studies • Analysing ideology: Far From Heaven • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film production • Hollywood • Beyond Hollywood: two examples • National and transnational film • Analysing production: In This World • Selected reading • Useful websites • Film consumption • Places and experiences • Cinema before cinemas • Spaces of cinemagoing • Home looking • Analysing consumption: Metro Cinema, Derby • Selected reading • Useful websites • Conclusion: film studies in the digital age • Selected reading • Useful websites • Further reading • Online resources • Index Printed Pages: 368., Viva Books, 2010, Black Lake Press. Paperback. New. Paperback. 96 pages. Dimensions: 8.4in. x 5.6in. x 0.4in.NOTE: This is the small group, companion workbook for Heard: The Power and Promise of Christian Prayer. It divides the material in Heard into six study sessions, each containing a mix of fill-in-the-blank and questions for individual reflection and group discussion. DESCRIPTION OF HEARD: God is waiting for his people to pray. But the contemporary Western Church is blighted by a prayer famine. It is plagued with dry eyes, few tears and no fire in the gut. Conversation with God ought to be a part of the natural rhythm of our lives, like eating or sleeping, yet we have neglected this most basic need. Our churches have kept us so busy with activities, carefully-crafted music presentations and non-offensive preaching that we are often too tired to pray, and impatient when we do. As a result, altars are vacant, church members come in and go out the same, the local culture remains unchanged. Dale Van Steenis calls us to recapture our energy and excitement, to catch our second wind in prayer. God still answers. He said he would. Whenever Gods people have turned to him in prayer, they have been heard. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN., Black Lake Press, Atlantic Publishers & Distributors (P) Ltd., 2009. Hardcover. New. In this book, the author analyses Lawrence’s ideas and visions in the perspective of New Historicism, and shows how these ideas and visions are useful to understand the world better and deeper. New Historicism as a critical practice draws on the earlier Marxist criticism, structuralism, feminist criticism and deconstruction. New historicists focus on the multiple and contradictory material practices interconnecting the historical events as contexts of production and reception. Since New Historicism stresses on the intimate relationship between literature, culture and history, there is a constant interaction of history, culture and ideology of the past with the present trends and situations. As a result, reading of texts of past is connected with the personal life history of the writer, the letters written by him to his contemporaries and his world views reflected in these marginal writings. An analysis of Lawrence’s letters and major novels reveals that contemporary man leads a life of falsity and negativity, and has lost his freshness as well as his rhythm by losing the vital contact with the “motion of life”, thereby turning into a “working machine”. He has come to this “deadness” because of his disconnection with the “responsive vegetation of nature”, the source of vitality for renewal of the body. In the context of such human conditions in our own civilization, a study of Lawrence’s works in the “new historical perspective” is a relevant and worthwhile pursuit. The social, political and cultural conditions prevailing in Lawrence’s time strongly influenced his artistic mind and creativity. The suicidal tendency of human beings to destroy each other through War (World War I) influenced his artistic vision quite significantly, which becomes explicit in his major works. D. H. Lawrence expresses the idea that man is living “a lie”, leading “a life of falsity, negativity and deadness”. The decline in human relationship is a current trend for man’s excessive indulgence in “money, power and machine”. This trend can however be reversed only if man leads a life of spontaneity based on “tenderness and sensitivity”, and tries to revitalize a mechanically dead people in “a rotten, dead civilization”. The book explores some new areas of meaning in human psyche. It will be immensely useful to the students, teachers and researchers who are pursuing their studies in English literature in general, and on D.H. Lawrence and his major novels in particular. Printed Pages: 176., Atlantic Publishers & Distributors (P) Ltd., 2009, Atlantic Publishers & Distributors (P) Ltd., 2009. Hardcover. New. In this book, the author analyses Lawrence’s ideas and visions in the perspective of New Historicism, and shows how these ideas and visions are useful to understand the world better and deeper. New Historicism as a critical practice draws on the earlier Marxist criticism, structuralism, feminist criticism and deconstruction. New historicists focus on the multiple and contradictory material practices interconnecting the historical events as contexts of production and reception. Since New Historicism stresses on the intimate relationship between literature, culture and history, there is a constant interaction of history, culture and ideology of the past with the present trends and situations. As a result, reading of texts of past is connected with the personal life history of the writer, the letters written by him to his contemporaries and his world views reflected in these marginal writings. An analysis of Lawrence’s letters and major novels reveals that contemporary man leads a life of falsity and negativity, and has lost his freshness as well as his rhythm by losing the vital contact with the “motion of life”, thereby turning into a “working machine”. He has come to this “deadness” because of his disconnection with the “responsive vegetation of nature”, the source of vitality for renewal of the body. In the context of such human conditions in our own civilization, a study of Lawrence’s works in the “new historical perspective” is a relevant and worthwhile pursuit. The social, political and cultural conditions prevailing in Lawrence’s time strongly influenced his artistic mind and creativity. The suicidal tendency of human beings to destroy each other through War (World War I) influenced his artistic vision quite significantly, which becomes explicit in his major works. D. H. Lawrence expresses the idea that man is living “a lie”, leading “a life of falsity, negativity and deadness”. The decline in human relationship is a current trend for man’s excessive indulgence in “money, power and machine”. This trend can however be reversed only if man leads a life of spontaneity based on “tenderness and sensitivity”, and tries to revitalize a mechanically dead people in “a rotten, dead civilization”. The book explores some new areas of meaning in human psyche. It will be immensely useful to the students, teachers and researchers who are pursuing their studies in English literature in general, and on D.H. Lawrence and his major novels in particular. Printed Pages: 176., Atlantic Publishers & Distributors (P) Ltd., 2009, Duke University Press Books. Hardcover. 0822330830 New book - Communities of the Air covers historical periods, genres, performers, program types, and audiences not previously discussed in this still all too thin area of radio studies.?? ?Turn up the volume! At last, we?re tuned in to the right frequency for radio studies. We all listen to radio, we remember our lives through it?and now we have the tools to understand it too.?? A pioneering analysis of radio as both a cultural and material production, Communities of the Air explores radio?s powerful role in shaping Anglo-American culture and society since the early twentieth century. Scholars and radio writers, producers, and critics look at the many ways radio generates multiple communities over the air?from elite to popular, dominant to resistant, canonical to transgressive. The contributors approach radio not only in its own right, but also as a set of practices?both technological and social?illuminating broader issues such as race relations, gender politics, and the construction of regional and national identities. Drawing on the perspectives of literary and cultural studies, science studies and feminist theory, radio history, and the new field of radio studies, these essays consider the development of radio as technology: how it was modeled on the telephone, early conflicts between for-profit and public uses of radio, and amateur radio (HAMS), local programming, and low-power radio. Some pieces discuss how radio gives voice to different cultural groups, focusing on the BBC and poetry programming in the West Indies, black radio, the history of alternative radio since the 1970s, and science and contemporary arts programming. Others look at radio?s influence on gender (and gender?s influence on radio) through examinations of Queen Elizabeth?s broadcasts, Gracie Allen?s comedy, and programming geared toward women. Together the contributors demonstrate how attention to the variety of ways radio is used and understood reveals the dynamic emergence and transformation of communities within the larger society. Contributors. Laurence A. Breiner, Bruce B. Campbell, Mary Desjardins, Lauren M. E. Goodlad, Nina Hunteman, Leah Lowe, Adrienne Munich, Kathleen Newman, Martin Spinelli, Susan Merrill Squier, Donald Ulin, Mark Williams, Steve Wurzler . New., Duke University Press Books, New York. 1991. Viking Press. Advance Reading Copy. Very Good In Wrappers. 359 pages. November 1991. paperback. Cover art by Bascove. 0670841897. keywords: Literature Canada. inventory # 14993. FROM THE PUBLISHER - The unexpected conceit devised by the author of the Deptford trilogy will surprise but likely not disappoint his fans. Shortly into the first chapter, narrator Connor Gilmartin, entertainment editor for a Canadian newspaper, is killed by his wife’s lover, the paper’s unctuous film critic, after coming upon the pair in his marital bed. Gil is astonished to find himself invisibly present at the scene, observing the craven retreat of the critic and his wife’s subsequent tale to the police about her husband’s fight with a burglar. Gil’s next shock is learning that his fate is now tied to his murderer’s and requires his joining the critic at an archival film festival. The films Gil sees, however, depict his personal history, powerfully presenting the lives of many of his ancestors. Notable among them are Anna Gage from 18th-century New York City, who takes her three children up the Hudson River in a canoe to Canada after her husband, an English officer, is killed at Breed’s Hill; and a story-telling Methodist preacher in Wales. Gil’s growing admiration for these flawed, courageous people reminds him of conversations with a metaphysically inclined friend who once advised him, ‘Feel before you think!’ Relating this murder story with his customary wit, Davies resolves it to the reader’s satisfaction, but the real treat is in Gil’s posthumous growth to compassion and understanding. ‘We live and learn, yes,’ he observes. ‘But we die and learn, too, it appears.’ - PUBLISHERS WEEKLY. William Robertson Davies, (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. He was one of Canada’s best-known and most popular authors, and one of its most distinguished ‘men of letters’, a term Davies is sometimes said to have detested. Davies was the founding Master of Massey College, a graduate college at the University of Toronto. Growing up, Davies was surrounded by books and language. His father, Senator William Rupert Davies, was a newspaperman, and both his parents were voracious readers. He, in turn, read everything he could. He also participated in theatrical productions as a child, where he developed a lifelong interest in drama. He attended Upper Canada College in Toronto from 1926 to 1932 and while there attended services at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene. He would later leave the Presbyterian Church and convert to Anglicanism over objections to Calvinist theology. After Upper Canada College, he studied at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario from 1932 until 1935. At Queen’s he was enrolled as a special student not working towards a degree, and wrote for the student paper, The Queen’s Journal. He left Canada to study at Balliol College, Oxford, where he received a BLitt degree in 1938. The next year he published his thesis, Shakespeare’s Boy Actors, and embarked on an acting career outside London. In 1940 he played small roles and did literary work for the director at the Old Vic Repertory Company in London. Also that year Davies married Australian Brenda Mathews, whom he had met at Oxford, and who was then working as stage manager for the theatre. Davies’ early life provided him with themes and material to which he would often return in his later work, including the theme of Canadians returning to England to finish their education, and the theatre. Davies and his new bride returned to Canada in 1940, where he took the position of literary editor at the magazine Saturday Night. Two years later, he became editor of the Peterborough Examiner in the small city of Peterborough, Ontario, northeast of Toronto. Again he was able to mine his experiences here for many of the characters and situations which later appeared in his novels and plays. Davies, along with family members William Rupert Davies and Arthur Davies, purchased several media outlets. Along with the Examiner newspaper, they owned the Kingston Whig-Standard newspaper, CHEX-AM, CKWS-AM, CHEX-TV, and CKWS-TV. During his tenure as editor of the Examiner, which lasted from 1942 to 1955, and when he was publisher from 1955 to 1965, Davies published a total 18 books, produced several of his own plays and wrote articles for various journals. For example, Davies set out his theory of acting in his Shakespeare for Young Players (1947) and then put theory into practice when he wrote Eros at Breakfast, a one-act play which was named best Canadian play of the year by the 1948 Dominion Drama Festival. Eros at Breakfast was followed in close succession by Fortune, My Foe in 1949 and At My Heart’s Core, a three-act play, in 1950. Meanwhile, Davies was writing humorous essays in the Examiner under the pseudonym Samuel Marchbanks. Some of these were collected and published in The Diary of Samuel Marchbanks (1947), The Table Talk of Samuel Marchbanks (1949), and later in Samuel Marchbanks’ Almanack (1967). (An omnibus edition of the three Marchbanks books, with new notes by the author, was published under the title The Papers of Samuel Marchbanks in 1985.) Also during the 1950s, Davies played a major role in launching the Stratford Shakespearean Festival of Canada. He served on the Festival’s board of governors and collaborated with the Festival’s director, Sir Tyrone Guthrie, in publishing three books about the Festival’s early years. Although his first love was drama and he had achieved some success with his occasional humorous essays, Davies found greater success in fiction. His first three novels, which later became known as The Salterton Trilogy, were Tempest-Tost (1951), Leaven of Malice (1954) (which won the Stephen Leacock Award for Humour), and A Mixture of Frailties (1958). These novels explored the difficulty of sustaining a cultural life in Canada, and life on a small-town newspaper, subjects of which Davies had first-hand knowledge. In 1960 Davies joined Trinity College at the University of Toronto, where he would teach literature until 1981. The following year he published a collection of essays on literature A Voice From the Attic, and was awarded the Lorne Pierce Medal for his literary achievements. In 1963 he became the Master of Massey College, the University of Toronto’s new graduate college. During his stint as Master, he initiated the tradition of writing and telling ghost stories at the yearly Christmas celebrations. His stories were later collected in his book High Spirits (1982). Davies drew on his interest in Jungian psychology to create what was perhaps his greatest novel: Fifth Business (1970), a book that draws heavily on Davies’ own experiences, his love of myth and magic and his knowledge of small-town mores. The narrator, like Davies, is of immigrant Canadian background, with a father who runs the town paper. The book’s characters act in roles that roughly correspond to Jungian archetypes according to Davies’ belief in the predominance of the spirit over the things of the world. Davies built on the success of Fifth Business with two more novels: The Manticore (1972), a novel cast largely in the form of a Jungian analysis (for which he received that year’s Governor-General’s Literary Award), and World of Wonders (1975). Together these three books came to be known as The Deptford Trilogy. When Davies retired from his position at the University, his seventh novel, a satire of academic life, The Rebel Angels (1981), was published, followed by What’s Bred in the Bone (1985). These two books, along with The Lyre of Orpheus, became known as The Cornish Trilogy. During his retirement he continued to write novels which further established him as a major figure in the literary world: The Lyre of Orpheus (1988), Murther and Walking Spirits (1991) and The Cunning Man (1994). A third novel in what would have been a further trilogy was in progress at Davies’ death. He also realized a long-held dream when he penned the libretto to an opera: The Golden Ass, based on The Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius, just like that written by one of the characters in Davies’ 1958 A Mixture of Frailties. The opera was performed by the Canadian Opera Company at the Hummingbird Centre in Toronto, in April, 1999, several years after Davies’ death. Davies was a fine public speaker: deft, often humorous, and unafraid to be unfashionable. . ISBN: 0670841897., Palgrave Macmillan, UK, 2012. First Edition. Hardcover. New. Available Now. Book Description: Iconic Power is a collection of original articles that explores social aspects of the phenomenon of icon. Having experienced the benefits and realized the limitations of so called "linguistic turn," sociology has recently acknowledged a need to further expand its horizons. "Visual sociology" is emerging as a separate field and prominent scholars announce the coming of "the pictorial turn." The methods and themes taken up in these studies respond to this shift in social scientific interest. Each contribution to this book carefully tests the analytic purchase and empirical implications of iconicity. If we can succeed in understanding the iconic, we should be able to know our culture much better. : Review: 'Iconic Power is the strongest theoretical statement to yet come out of the 'Strong Program' in Cultural Sociology. Arguably, more than any other trope, including those of ritual and performance, the concept of 'iconicity' promises to break free of the economistic, linguistic and other kinds of reductionisms that plague the cultural sciences. This fine volume contains both theoretical expositions on how pictorial icons do their cultural work, as well as applied analyses of phenomena such as 9/11, images of famines, Woodstock and Bayreuth as 'iconic' events, expensive Australian red wines and the political iconography of Post-Communist Eastern Europe. If cultural sociology is to have a vibrant future and not repeat the mistakes of the past then in Iconic Power: Materiality and Meaning in Social Life practitioners have a handbook on how to approach the distinctive character of the visual and other non-discursive symbols.' - Eduardo de la Fuente, Sociology, Flinders University; author of Twentieth Century Music and the Question of Modernity 'Ranging in its coverage from the events of 9/11 to images of HIV, and from the revolutions of 1989 to cult wines, this book systematically unpacks the tremendous importance of icons in social life. Both a striking contribution to visual sociology, and a powerful manifesto for new directions in cultural sociology, Iconic Power is fascinating reading for everyone interested in the seductive potency of iconography.' - David Inglis, Head of Department, Department of Sociology, University of Aberdeen" : Book Description: The methods and themes taken up in these studies respond to this shift in social scientific interest. Each contribution carefully tests the analytic purchase and empirical implications of iconicity Size: 15.6 x 2.1 x 24.6 cm. 272 pages. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 500 grams. Category: Business, Finance & Marketing; Sales & Marketing. ISBN: 0230340059. ISBN/EAN: 9780230340053. Inventory No: F170-1118. . 9780230340053, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999. Hardcover with dustjacket in protective mylar cover. Very good condition. Mention a name from a beloved childhood picture bookÑMadeline, Corduroy, Peter Rabbit, Max and his "wild things"Ñand most adults can recollect a bright image, fragments of a story, the timbre of a certain reading voice, the sensation of being held, and best of all being together with someone and enveloped in fantasy. Why do picture book images shown to us as young children linger in our minds? How do picture books shape our lives early on and even later into adulthood? This book takes up such questions. It explores the profound impact of the experience of reading to children. Ellen Handler Spitz reveals how classic picture books transmit psychological wisdom, convey moral lessons, shape tastes, and implant subtle prejudices. Each chapter of the book discusses well-known children's booksÑGoodnight Moon, Babar, Little Black Sambo, to name a fewÑthat deal with a theme of importance to young children. These include bedtime, separation, loss, and death; curiosity, disobedience, and punishment; and identity and self-acceptance. Focusing on the relationship between a child and an adult reader, Spitz explains the notion of "conversational reading" and emphasizes the mutual benefits of dialogue and intimacy. This book not only gives parents, grandparents, teachers, therapists, and scholars a new understanding of the meaning of picture books, it also empowers adults to interpret and choose future cultural experiences for their children. Ellen Handler Spitz is a lecturer in the department of art at Stanford University. She writes and lectures widely on the arts, psychology, and culture. She is also the author of Art and Psyche and Museums of the Mind. "This is a book for each and every adult (professionals and parents) who read to children providing a mutually enriching experience for child and adult. Ellen Handler Spitz has transmitted glowingly and in a wonderfully readable manner her deep and broad understanding of how the adult reading to and looking with younger and older children at books written for and artistically created for children and their readers can be a powerful positive force in the lives of children and their readers (parents).In writing this original, scholarly, highly readable book for children's readers, Ellen Handler Spitz has also enlarged our understanding of how children's capacities for pretending, playing and imagining is nurtured and enhanced in the context of a personal relationship with the reader. She demonstrates this with a literary, psychological analysis of picture story book classics that are suitable for readers and children of all ages.Ellen Handler Spitz is an effective advocate for the practice of adults reading to children. In this book the author describes how this process engages children in reading as an abiding resource, one that helps to organize and consolidate a powerful transcending force, the mutual, warm, trusting bond of children and their parents."ÑAlbert J. Solnit, M.D., senior research scientist at the Child Study Center and Sterling Professor Emeritus Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Yale University "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read the picture books that have enchanted generations of young children. She shows convincingly how hidden in the familiar stories such as Goodnight Moon, Where the Wild Things Are and many others (which she analyzes in detail) are the anxieties of childhood such as fear of separation and loss or the threat of aggression. Encouraged by the brave and funny characters in the story and soothed by the gentle rise and fall of the parents voice the child falls asleep. These interactions, although brief, often have a lasting influence on the child's imagination and moral development. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child. Essential reading for every parent, teacher and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., author of Second Chances Men, Women and Children a decade after Divorce, Founder Center for the Family in Transition "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read picture books. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child that is essential reading for every parent, teacher, and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., founder of the Center for the Family in Transition "This is a splendid addition to the literature about children's booksÑa unique synthesis of key ideas from developmental psychology, from psychoanalytic theory and from literary criticism. Both scholarly and lively, it is to be recommended to psychoanalysts, specialists in children's literature, parents, and all former children. Spitz's postulates are thought provoking and entertaining. They offer fresh insights into old favorites as well as providing an introduction to less well known books, and new ways of approaching all children's picture books."ÑLynn Reiser, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine "Spitz understands just how important it is to think of the picture book as a vehicle for constructing meaning with the child and for developing a relationship between child and adult."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "A work of profound cultural importance, this book addresses the powerful impact of books that shaped our lives early on and that continue to guide us in our adult lives."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "If we really believe 'a picture is worth a thousand words,' and I do, then we all should pay much more attention to picture books and what they print on our memory. This book goes right to the core of the issue."ÑPat Schroeder, president and CEO of the Association of American Publishers and former congresswoman "What a marvelously thought-provoking book! Spitz examines a wide assortment of classic children's picture books that deal with important parenting themes from a psychological viewpoint. . . . The books she examines are children's classics; but, because she is looking at them from a different perspective, the insights she offers on these works, and their authors, are truly refreshing. The ones that I had read, I want to go back and read again. Those that I hadn't read, are ones that I now want to read. . . . In the end one comes away with a new appreciation for both the quality of good picture books and the important role that they play not only in entertaining children, but in providing children and parents guideposts in life's journey."ÑNorman D. Stevens, American Book Collectors of Children's Literature Newsletter "[A] fascinating psycho-social exploration." Ñ Victoria Brownworth, Baltimore Sun "Without jargon or pretension, Spitz celebrates the story and art in [children's] books while discussing their effects in terms of psychology, aesthetics, morality and culture. . . . Even readers who have known about the books forever will find surprising things to think about. Parents and other adults who read aloud to kids, as well as children's literature professionals, will enjoy what Spitz shows about the power of these deceptively simple images and the pleasure of sharing them across generations." ÑBooklist "It was absolutely a pleasure to read this book. . . . Dr. Spitz understands that reading aloud is a relational activity that involves shared experiences between generations. The author does a fantastic job of describing the joy involved in this experience."ÑMeredith Sargent, Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic "Responding to characters and contexts in text and illustrations, Spitz has found a treasure trove of psychological implications in picture books. . . . Concerned parents, and surely devoted grandparents, will find fresh challenges here to help them think more about picture books' inscribed cultural values and, too often, stereotypes. Teachers and librarians will want to analyze Spitz's assumptions and examples. General readers; undergraduate and graduate students; professionals." ÑChoice "As much a call to action as it is an analysis."ÑJennifer K. Ruark, Chronicle of Higher Education "Because of her faith in the imagination, her hesitations, and her excellent taste, Spitz's selection and analysis of books in four picture-book subjectsÑbedtime, loss, anger, self-acceptanceÑare strong and provide a good model for choosing among contemporary offerings."ÑDaria Donnelly, Commonweal "Ellen Handler Spitz probes the complex aesthetic and psychoanalytic affects transmitted by the words and images of children's books. . . . Spitz writes in a clear and engaging fashion, one that is readable even to nonacademics."ÑLinda M. Pavonetti, Journal of Children's Literature "I can think of no better introduction and guide to young children's literature than Inside Picture Books. Drawing from her training in both psychology and art, Ellen Handler Spitz presents a beautifully written treatise on the content and form of successful picture books, and the ways in which these books tap into the imagination of the child. . . . In summary, Inside Picture Books provides a special window of insight into how classic and popular children's books connect with children. It is a book that is intended to teach parents about the complexity of themes that, at first blush, appear to be presented simply. It is a commentary on the power of the shared experience in imagination between parent-reader and child-listener. It is a book to be enjoyed by adults who have grown up enjoying picture books and a tutorial on how to look more deeply into what the child hears and sees. For developmental and behavioral specialists, it provides a new and fascinating slant on the child's use of imagination in the service of grown in understanding."ÑJ. Lane Tanner, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics "There is something fine and rare in Ms. Spitz's book, with its interpretations of picture books ranging from Margaret Wise Brown's 'Goodnight Moon' to Marjorie Flack's 'Story About Ping.' . . . Ms. Spitz speaks to her readers not as an academic but as a practiced read-aloud, knowing the relationship between storyteller and listener."ÑEdward Rothstein, New York Times "[A] sensitive, concentrated study. . . . [Spitz] stresses the pleasure of reading with children, its special intimacies and esthetic satisfactions of rhythm and reverie, sadness and humor. She draws attention to the pedagogical necessities of following child listeners' understanding, of listening to what they ask and feel, and guiding them, and she rejoices in picture books' power to develop 'inner possibilities.' . . . Spitz communicates vividly her pleasure in her material and speaks up vibrantly for the importance, complexity and place of shared reading and picture books in young lives and their future."ÑMarina Warner, New York Times Book Review "With a background in psychology and children's literature, Spitz accessibly explains the significance of bedtime classics such as Goodnight Moon and Bedtime for Frances. . . . Spitz offers interesting observations and anecdotal information on how children project their own experiences and emotions into picture book characters, from mischievous Max in Where the Wild Things Are to the curious protagonist of The Poky Little Puppy. . . . Throughout, too, she conveys her own delight in picture books and the wisdom of sharing books with children."ÑNancy Pate, Orlando Sentinel "What an impressive and rich work! The insight is awesome and I know this book will be able to help parents understand their children so much better than so many of the 'how to' books that are so prevalent on the parent education market. With every page of this book I was compelled to read on, with the feeling I can't wait to share what I'm learning with parents everywhere. If you enjoy reading to your children, I know you will enjoy reading this book."ÑBarbara Burrows, Parenting Magazine "[A] touchingly sensitive and wisdom-filled book. I recommend it wholeheartedly to parents and grandparents, to teachers and writers, to psychoanalysts and other mental health professionals, to all those who are interested in children and how to assisted them in negotiating the mine-laden path of growing up."ÑMartin A. Silverman, Psychoanalytic Quarterly "[A] thought-provoking examination. . . . [Spitz's] book is a must-read for any serious student of children's literature as well as that core group of parents, grandparents, teachers, librarians, and others who are actively engaged in raising children. Provocative, well-written, scholarly without being dry or pedantic, Spitz's text makes a compelling case for the power of art and literature, and the responsibility that accompanies such power, particularly when it relates to children."ÑPublishers Weekly "Through lucid analyses of text and illustrations in beloved children's books, the author provides a thoughtful guide to choosing and using classic books to read aloud with young children. . . . This graceful book is a wonderful resource, full of insights for parents, as well as for child care personnel."ÑAlice Sterling Honig, Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health "[A] brilliant study. . . . [Spitz] organizes her study by the major psychological themes that picture books address--fear of separation (usually first experienced at bedtime, death and loss, disobedience and punishment, and self-acceptance. Along the way, she provides glimpses at the books' larger cultural contexts and her research into children's responses. . . . Inside Picture Books is a rich, multilayered discussion of a powerful art form that is relevant to us all."ÑJohn Hammond, San Antonio Express-News "[Spitz] has assembled for study some of the most mesmerizing and enduring children's books of the last century. . . . Inside Picture Books . . . contains a critically important message, that of p, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999

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SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD):

Inside Picture Books - signed or inscribed book

1999, ISBN: 9780300076028

Paperback, Hardcover, ID: 693776443

California Division of Mines and Geology. PAPERBACK. B0007E6NJ6 1964 First edition, California Division of Mines and Geology (San Francisco), 8 x 11 inches tall. 177pp. Green paperbound with black lettering to front covers. Prior owner (J. Wyatt Durbin) written in black ink to top of front cover. Including two folded maps in pocket at rear of volume. Covers quite edgeworn with tape repairs to spine. Covers are creased, with title written in black pen to spine. Covers also have tiny closed tears to top and bottom edges. Corner curl to paperback. Otherwise, a very good copy.~XX~ Association Copy: The prior owner, J. Wyatt Durham (1907-1996), was an invertebrate paleontologist and biostratigrapher who spent more than a quarter century at UC Berkeley as professor of paleontology and curator of fossil invertebrates [D1]~xx~ . Good. 1964 . First edition., California Division of Mines and Geology, 1964, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999. Hardcover with dustjacket in protective mylar cover. Very good condition. Mention a name from a beloved childhood picture bookÑMadeline, Corduroy, Peter Rabbit, Max and his "wild things"Ñand most adults can recollect a bright image, fragments of a story, the timbre of a certain reading voice, the sensation of being held, and best of all being together with someone and enveloped in fantasy. Why do picture book images shown to us as young children linger in our minds? How do picture books shape our lives early on and even later into adulthood? This book takes up such questions. It explores the profound impact of the experience of reading to children. Ellen Handler Spitz reveals how classic picture books transmit psychological wisdom, convey moral lessons, shape tastes, and implant subtle prejudices. Each chapter of the book discusses well-known children's booksÑGoodnight Moon, Babar, Little Black Sambo, to name a fewÑthat deal with a theme of importance to young children. These include bedtime, separation, loss, and death; curiosity, disobedience, and punishment; and identity and self-acceptance. Focusing on the relationship between a child and an adult reader, Spitz explains the notion of "conversational reading" and emphasizes the mutual benefits of dialogue and intimacy. This book not only gives parents, grandparents, teachers, therapists, and scholars a new understanding of the meaning of picture books, it also empowers adults to interpret and choose future cultural experiences for their children. Ellen Handler Spitz is a lecturer in the department of art at Stanford University. She writes and lectures widely on the arts, psychology, and culture. She is also the author of Art and Psyche and Museums of the Mind. "This is a book for each and every adult (professionals and parents) who read to children providing a mutually enriching experience for child and adult. Ellen Handler Spitz has transmitted glowingly and in a wonderfully readable manner her deep and broad understanding of how the adult reading to and looking with younger and older children at books written for and artistically created for children and their readers can be a powerful positive force in the lives of children and their readers (parents).In writing this original, scholarly, highly readable book for children's readers, Ellen Handler Spitz has also enlarged our understanding of how children's capacities for pretending, playing and imagining is nurtured and enhanced in the context of a personal relationship with the reader. She demonstrates this with a literary, psychological analysis of picture story book classics that are suitable for readers and children of all ages.Ellen Handler Spitz is an effective advocate for the practice of adults reading to children. In this book the author describes how this process engages children in reading as an abiding resource, one that helps to organize and consolidate a powerful transcending force, the mutual, warm, trusting bond of children and their parents."ÑAlbert J. Solnit, M.D., senior research scientist at the Child Study Center and Sterling Professor Emeritus Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Yale University "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read the picture books that have enchanted generations of young children. She shows convincingly how hidden in the familiar stories such as Goodnight Moon, Where the Wild Things Are and many others (which she analyzes in detail) are the anxieties of childhood such as fear of separation and loss or the threat of aggression. Encouraged by the brave and funny characters in the story and soothed by the gentle rise and fall of the parents voice the child falls asleep. These interactions, although brief, often have a lasting influence on the child's imagination and moral development. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child. Essential reading for every parent, teacher and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., author of Second Chances Men, Women and Children a decade after Divorce, Founder Center for the Family in Transition "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read picture books. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child that is essential reading for every parent, teacher, and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., founder of the Center for the Family in Transition "This is a splendid addition to the literature about children's booksÑa unique synthesis of key ideas from developmental psychology, from psychoanalytic theory and from literary criticism. Both scholarly and lively, it is to be recommended to psychoanalysts, specialists in children's literature, parents, and all former children. Spitz's postulates are thought provoking and entertaining. They offer fresh insights into old favorites as well as providing an introduction to less well known books, and new ways of approaching all children's picture books."ÑLynn Reiser, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine "Spitz understands just how important it is to think of the picture book as a vehicle for constructing meaning with the child and for developing a relationship between child and adult."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "A work of profound cultural importance, this book addresses the powerful impact of books that shaped our lives early on and that continue to guide us in our adult lives."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "If we really believe 'a picture is worth a thousand words,' and I do, then we all should pay much more attention to picture books and what they print on our memory. This book goes right to the core of the issue."ÑPat Schroeder, president and CEO of the Association of American Publishers and former congresswoman "What a marvelously thought-provoking book! Spitz examines a wide assortment of classic children's picture books that deal with important parenting themes from a psychological viewpoint. . . . The books she examines are children's classics; but, because she is looking at them from a different perspective, the insights she offers on these works, and their authors, are truly refreshing. The ones that I had read, I want to go back and read again. Those that I hadn't read, are ones that I now want to read. . . . In the end one comes away with a new appreciation for both the quality of good picture books and the important role that they play not only in entertaining children, but in providing children and parents guideposts in life's journey."ÑNorman D. Stevens, American Book Collectors of Children's Literature Newsletter "[A] fascinating psycho-social exploration." Ñ Victoria Brownworth, Baltimore Sun "Without jargon or pretension, Spitz celebrates the story and art in [children's] books while discussing their effects in terms of psychology, aesthetics, morality and culture. . . . Even readers who have known about the books forever will find surprising things to think about. Parents and other adults who read aloud to kids, as well as children's literature professionals, will enjoy what Spitz shows about the power of these deceptively simple images and the pleasure of sharing them across generations." ÑBooklist "It was absolutely a pleasure to read this book. . . . Dr. Spitz understands that reading aloud is a relational activity that involves shared experiences between generations. The author does a fantastic job of describing the joy involved in this experience."ÑMeredith Sargent, Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic "Responding to characters and contexts in text and illustrations, Spitz has found a treasure trove of psychological implications in picture books. . . . Concerned parents, and surely devoted grandparents, will find fresh challenges here to help them think more about picture books' inscribed cultural values and, too often, stereotypes. Teachers and librarians will want to analyze Spitz's assumptions and examples. General readers; undergraduate and graduate students; professionals." ÑChoice "As much a call to action as it is an analysis."ÑJennifer K. Ruark, Chronicle of Higher Education "Because of her faith in the imagination, her hesitations, and her excellent taste, Spitz's selection and analysis of books in four picture-book subjectsÑbedtime, loss, anger, self-acceptanceÑare strong and provide a good model for choosing among contemporary offerings."ÑDaria Donnelly, Commonweal "Ellen Handler Spitz probes the complex aesthetic and psychoanalytic affects transmitted by the words and images of children's books. . . . Spitz writes in a clear and engaging fashion, one that is readable even to nonacademics."ÑLinda M. Pavonetti, Journal of Children's Literature "I can think of no better introduction and guide to young children's literature than Inside Picture Books. Drawing from her training in both psychology and art, Ellen Handler Spitz presents a beautifully written treatise on the content and form of successful picture books, and the ways in which these books tap into the imagination of the child. . . . In summary, Inside Picture Books provides a special window of insight into how classic and popular children's books connect with children. It is a book that is intended to teach parents about the complexity of themes that, at first blush, appear to be presented simply. It is a commentary on the power of the shared experience in imagination between parent-reader and child-listener. It is a book to be enjoyed by adults who have grown up enjoying picture books and a tutorial on how to look more deeply into what the child hears and sees. For developmental and behavioral specialists, it provides a new and fascinating slant on the child's use of imagination in the service of grown in understanding."ÑJ. Lane Tanner, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics "There is something fine and rare in Ms. Spitz's book, with its interpretations of picture books ranging from Margaret Wise Brown's 'Goodnight Moon' to Marjorie Flack's 'Story About Ping.' . . . Ms. Spitz speaks to her readers not as an academic but as a practiced read-aloud, knowing the relationship between storyteller and listener."ÑEdward Rothstein, New York Times "[A] sensitive, concentrated study. . . . [Spitz] stresses the pleasure of reading with children, its special intimacies and esthetic satisfactions of rhythm and reverie, sadness and humor. She draws attention to the pedagogical necessities of following child listeners' understanding, of listening to what they ask and feel, and guiding them, and she rejoices in picture books' power to develop 'inner possibilities.' . . . Spitz communicates vividly her pleasure in her material and speaks up vibrantly for the importance, complexity and place of shared reading and picture books in young lives and their future."ÑMarina Warner, New York Times Book Review "With a background in psychology and children's literature, Spitz accessibly explains the significance of bedtime classics such as Goodnight Moon and Bedtime for Frances. . . . Spitz offers interesting observations and anecdotal information on how children project their own experiences and emotions into picture book characters, from mischievous Max in Where the Wild Things Are to the curious protagonist of The Poky Little Puppy. . . . Throughout, too, she conveys her own delight in picture books and the wisdom of sharing books with children."ÑNancy Pate, Orlando Sentinel "What an impressive and rich work! The insight is awesome and I know this book will be able to help parents understand their children so much better than so many of the 'how to' books that are so prevalent on the parent education market. With every page of this book I was compelled to read on, with the feeling I can't wait to share what I'm learning with parents everywhere. If you enjoy reading to your children, I know you will enjoy reading this book."ÑBarbara Burrows, Parenting Magazine "[A] touchingly sensitive and wisdom-filled book. I recommend it wholeheartedly to parents and grandparents, to teachers and writers, to psychoanalysts and other mental health professionals, to all those who are interested in children and how to assisted them in negotiating the mine-laden path of growing up."ÑMartin A. Silverman, Psychoanalytic Quarterly "[A] thought-provoking examination. . . . [Spitz's] book is a must-read for any serious student of children's literature as well as that core group of parents, grandparents, teachers, librarians, and others who are actively engaged in raising children. Provocative, well-written, scholarly without being dry or pedantic, Spitz's text makes a compelling case for the power of art and literature, and the responsibility that accompanies such power, particularly when it relates to children."ÑPublishers Weekly "Through lucid analyses of text and illustrations in beloved children's books, the author provides a thoughtful guide to choosing and using classic books to read aloud with young children. . . . This graceful book is a wonderful resource, full of insights for parents, as well as for child care personnel."ÑAlice Sterling Honig, Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health "[A] brilliant study. . . . [Spitz] organizes her study by the major psychological themes that picture books address--fear of separation (usually first experienced at bedtime, death and loss, disobedience and punishment, and self-acceptance. Along the way, she provides glimpses at the books' larger cultural contexts and her research into children's responses. . . . Inside Picture Books is a rich, multilayered discussion of a powerful art form that is relevant to us all."ÑJohn Hammond, San Antonio Express-News "[Spitz] has assembled for study some of the most mesmerizing and enduring children's books of the last century. . . . Inside Picture Books . . . contains a critically important message, that of p, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999

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Inside Picture Books - SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD)
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SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD):
Inside Picture Books - signed or inscribed book

1999

ISBN: 9780300076028

Paperback, Hardcover, ID: 305479619

New York, USA: Monthly Review Press, 1969. Softcover, first edition, 458g, 343pgs. Looks at the theories and practices of capitalism in latin america, and the resulting issues. Book is in good condition with pen inscription inside front cover, and mild general wear and tear, otherwise no other pre-loved markings. Photo featured is of actual book. Purchase more than 1 item and save money with combined postage. And if you can't find the title your looking for - why not ask us direct. With over 30,000 books in stock we can't list them all!!.. First Edition. Soft Cover. Good/Not Applicable. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall., Monthly Review Press, 1969, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999. Hardcover with dustjacket in protective mylar cover. Very good condition. Mention a name from a beloved childhood picture bookÑMadeline, Corduroy, Peter Rabbit, Max and his "wild things"Ñand most adults can recollect a bright image, fragments of a story, the timbre of a certain reading voice, the sensation of being held, and best of all being together with someone and enveloped in fantasy. Why do picture book images shown to us as young children linger in our minds? How do picture books shape our lives early on and even later into adulthood? This book takes up such questions. It explores the profound impact of the experience of reading to children. Ellen Handler Spitz reveals how classic picture books transmit psychological wisdom, convey moral lessons, shape tastes, and implant subtle prejudices. Each chapter of the book discusses well-known children's booksÑGoodnight Moon, Babar, Little Black Sambo, to name a fewÑthat deal with a theme of importance to young children. These include bedtime, separation, loss, and death; curiosity, disobedience, and punishment; and identity and self-acceptance. Focusing on the relationship between a child and an adult reader, Spitz explains the notion of "conversational reading" and emphasizes the mutual benefits of dialogue and intimacy. This book not only gives parents, grandparents, teachers, therapists, and scholars a new understanding of the meaning of picture books, it also empowers adults to interpret and choose future cultural experiences for their children. Ellen Handler Spitz is a lecturer in the department of art at Stanford University. She writes and lectures widely on the arts, psychology, and culture. She is also the author of Art and Psyche and Museums of the Mind. "This is a book for each and every adult (professionals and parents) who read to children providing a mutually enriching experience for child and adult. Ellen Handler Spitz has transmitted glowingly and in a wonderfully readable manner her deep and broad understanding of how the adult reading to and looking with younger and older children at books written for and artistically created for children and their readers can be a powerful positive force in the lives of children and their readers (parents).In writing this original, scholarly, highly readable book for children's readers, Ellen Handler Spitz has also enlarged our understanding of how children's capacities for pretending, playing and imagining is nurtured and enhanced in the context of a personal relationship with the reader. She demonstrates this with a literary, psychological analysis of picture story book classics that are suitable for readers and children of all ages.Ellen Handler Spitz is an effective advocate for the practice of adults reading to children. In this book the author describes how this process engages children in reading as an abiding resource, one that helps to organize and consolidate a powerful transcending force, the mutual, warm, trusting bond of children and their parents."ÑAlbert J. Solnit, M.D., senior research scientist at the Child Study Center and Sterling Professor Emeritus Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Yale University "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read the picture books that have enchanted generations of young children. She shows convincingly how hidden in the familiar stories such as Goodnight Moon, Where the Wild Things Are and many others (which she analyzes in detail) are the anxieties of childhood such as fear of separation and loss or the threat of aggression. Encouraged by the brave and funny characters in the story and soothed by the gentle rise and fall of the parents voice the child falls asleep. These interactions, although brief, often have a lasting influence on the child's imagination and moral development. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child. Essential reading for every parent, teacher and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., author of Second Chances Men, Women and Children a decade after Divorce, Founder Center for the Family in Transition "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read picture books. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child that is essential reading for every parent, teacher, and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., founder of the Center for the Family in Transition "This is a splendid addition to the literature about children's booksÑa unique synthesis of key ideas from developmental psychology, from psychoanalytic theory and from literary criticism. Both scholarly and lively, it is to be recommended to psychoanalysts, specialists in children's literature, parents, and all former children. Spitz's postulates are thought provoking and entertaining. They offer fresh insights into old favorites as well as providing an introduction to less well known books, and new ways of approaching all children's picture books."ÑLynn Reiser, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine "Spitz understands just how important it is to think of the picture book as a vehicle for constructing meaning with the child and for developing a relationship between child and adult."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "A work of profound cultural importance, this book addresses the powerful impact of books that shaped our lives early on and that continue to guide us in our adult lives."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "If we really believe 'a picture is worth a thousand words,' and I do, then we all should pay much more attention to picture books and what they print on our memory. This book goes right to the core of the issue."ÑPat Schroeder, president and CEO of the Association of American Publishers and former congresswoman "What a marvelously thought-provoking book! Spitz examines a wide assortment of classic children's picture books that deal with important parenting themes from a psychological viewpoint. . . . The books she examines are children's classics; but, because she is looking at them from a different perspective, the insights she offers on these works, and their authors, are truly refreshing. The ones that I had read, I want to go back and read again. Those that I hadn't read, are ones that I now want to read. . . . In the end one comes away with a new appreciation for both the quality of good picture books and the important role that they play not only in entertaining children, but in providing children and parents guideposts in life's journey."ÑNorman D. Stevens, American Book Collectors of Children's Literature Newsletter "[A] fascinating psycho-social exploration." Ñ Victoria Brownworth, Baltimore Sun "Without jargon or pretension, Spitz celebrates the story and art in [children's] books while discussing their effects in terms of psychology, aesthetics, morality and culture. . . . Even readers who have known about the books forever will find surprising things to think about. Parents and other adults who read aloud to kids, as well as children's literature professionals, will enjoy what Spitz shows about the power of these deceptively simple images and the pleasure of sharing them across generations." ÑBooklist "It was absolutely a pleasure to read this book. . . . Dr. Spitz understands that reading aloud is a relational activity that involves shared experiences between generations. The author does a fantastic job of describing the joy involved in this experience."ÑMeredith Sargent, Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic "Responding to characters and contexts in text and illustrations, Spitz has found a treasure trove of psychological implications in picture books. . . . Concerned parents, and surely devoted grandparents, will find fresh challenges here to help them think more about picture books' inscribed cultural values and, too often, stereotypes. Teachers and librarians will want to analyze Spitz's assumptions and examples. General readers; undergraduate and graduate students; professionals." ÑChoice "As much a call to action as it is an analysis."ÑJennifer K. Ruark, Chronicle of Higher Education "Because of her faith in the imagination, her hesitations, and her excellent taste, Spitz's selection and analysis of books in four picture-book subjectsÑbedtime, loss, anger, self-acceptanceÑare strong and provide a good model for choosing among contemporary offerings."ÑDaria Donnelly, Commonweal "Ellen Handler Spitz probes the complex aesthetic and psychoanalytic affects transmitted by the words and images of children's books. . . . Spitz writes in a clear and engaging fashion, one that is readable even to nonacademics."ÑLinda M. Pavonetti, Journal of Children's Literature "I can think of no better introduction and guide to young children's literature than Inside Picture Books. Drawing from her training in both psychology and art, Ellen Handler Spitz presents a beautifully written treatise on the content and form of successful picture books, and the ways in which these books tap into the imagination of the child. . . . In summary, Inside Picture Books provides a special window of insight into how classic and popular children's books connect with children. It is a book that is intended to teach parents about the complexity of themes that, at first blush, appear to be presented simply. It is a commentary on the power of the shared experience in imagination between parent-reader and child-listener. It is a book to be enjoyed by adults who have grown up enjoying picture books and a tutorial on how to look more deeply into what the child hears and sees. For developmental and behavioral specialists, it provides a new and fascinating slant on the child's use of imagination in the service of grown in understanding."ÑJ. Lane Tanner, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics "There is something fine and rare in Ms. Spitz's book, with its interpretations of picture books ranging from Margaret Wise Brown's 'Goodnight Moon' to Marjorie Flack's 'Story About Ping.' . . . Ms. Spitz speaks to her readers not as an academic but as a practiced read-aloud, knowing the relationship between storyteller and listener."ÑEdward Rothstein, New York Times "[A] sensitive, concentrated study. . . . [Spitz] stresses the pleasure of reading with children, its special intimacies and esthetic satisfactions of rhythm and reverie, sadness and humor. She draws attention to the pedagogical necessities of following child listeners' understanding, of listening to what they ask and feel, and guiding them, and she rejoices in picture books' power to develop 'inner possibilities.' . . . Spitz communicates vividly her pleasure in her material and speaks up vibrantly for the importance, complexity and place of shared reading and picture books in young lives and their future."ÑMarina Warner, New York Times Book Review "With a background in psychology and children's literature, Spitz accessibly explains the significance of bedtime classics such as Goodnight Moon and Bedtime for Frances. . . . Spitz offers interesting observations and anecdotal information on how children project their own experiences and emotions into picture book characters, from mischievous Max in Where the Wild Things Are to the curious protagonist of The Poky Little Puppy. . . . Throughout, too, she conveys her own delight in picture books and the wisdom of sharing books with children."ÑNancy Pate, Orlando Sentinel "What an impressive and rich work! The insight is awesome and I know this book will be able to help parents understand their children so much better than so many of the 'how to' books that are so prevalent on the parent education market. With every page of this book I was compelled to read on, with the feeling I can't wait to share what I'm learning with parents everywhere. If you enjoy reading to your children, I know you will enjoy reading this book."ÑBarbara Burrows, Parenting Magazine "[A] touchingly sensitive and wisdom-filled book. I recommend it wholeheartedly to parents and grandparents, to teachers and writers, to psychoanalysts and other mental health professionals, to all those who are interested in children and how to assisted them in negotiating the mine-laden path of growing up."ÑMartin A. Silverman, Psychoanalytic Quarterly "[A] thought-provoking examination. . . . [Spitz's] book is a must-read for any serious student of children's literature as well as that core group of parents, grandparents, teachers, librarians, and others who are actively engaged in raising children. Provocative, well-written, scholarly without being dry or pedantic, Spitz's text makes a compelling case for the power of art and literature, and the responsibility that accompanies such power, particularly when it relates to children."ÑPublishers Weekly "Through lucid analyses of text and illustrations in beloved children's books, the author provides a thoughtful guide to choosing and using classic books to read aloud with young children. . . . This graceful book is a wonderful resource, full of insights for parents, as well as for child care personnel."ÑAlice Sterling Honig, Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health "[A] brilliant study. . . . [Spitz] organizes her study by the major psychological themes that picture books address--fear of separation (usually first experienced at bedtime, death and loss, disobedience and punishment, and self-acceptance. Along the way, she provides glimpses at the books' larger cultural contexts and her research into children's responses. . . . Inside Picture Books is a rich, multilayered discussion of a powerful art form that is relevant to us all."ÑJohn Hammond, San Antonio Express-News "[Spitz] has assembled for study some of the most mesmerizing and enduring children's books of the last century. . . . Inside Picture Books . . . contains a critically important message, that of p, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999

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Reading Habit, Ad Infinitum Books
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Inside Picture Books - SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD)
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SPITZ, ELLEN HANDLER; COLES, ROBERT (FOREWORD):
Inside Picture Books - signed or inscribed book

1999, ISBN: 9780300076028

Hardcover, ID: 434446498

Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999. Hardcover with dustjacket in protective mylar cover. Very good condition. Mention a name from a beloved childhood picture bookÑMadeline, Corduroy, Peter Rabbit, Max and his "wild things"Ñand most adults can recollect a bright image, fragments of a story, the timbre of a certain reading voice, the sensation of being held, and best of all being together with someone and enveloped in fantasy. Why do picture book images shown to us as young children linger in our minds? How do picture books shape our lives early on and even later into adulthood? This book takes up such questions. It explores the profound impact of the experience of reading to children. Ellen Handler Spitz reveals how classic picture books transmit psychological wisdom, convey moral lessons, shape tastes, and implant subtle prejudices. Each chapter of the book discusses well-known children's booksÑGoodnight Moon, Babar, Little Black Sambo, to name a fewÑthat deal with a theme of importance to young children. These include bedtime, separation, loss, and death; curiosity, disobedience, and punishment; and identity and self-acceptance. Focusing on the relationship between a child and an adult reader, Spitz explains the notion of "conversational reading" and emphasizes the mutual benefits of dialogue and intimacy. This book not only gives parents, grandparents, teachers, therapists, and scholars a new understanding of the meaning of picture books, it also empowers adults to interpret and choose future cultural experiences for their children. Ellen Handler Spitz is a lecturer in the department of art at Stanford University. She writes and lectures widely on the arts, psychology, and culture. She is also the author of Art and Psyche and Museums of the Mind. "This is a book for each and every adult (professionals and parents) who read to children providing a mutually enriching experience for child and adult. Ellen Handler Spitz has transmitted glowingly and in a wonderfully readable manner her deep and broad understanding of how the adult reading to and looking with younger and older children at books written for and artistically created for children and their readers can be a powerful positive force in the lives of children and their readers (parents).In writing this original, scholarly, highly readable book for children's readers, Ellen Handler Spitz has also enlarged our understanding of how children's capacities for pretending, playing and imagining is nurtured and enhanced in the context of a personal relationship with the reader. She demonstrates this with a literary, psychological analysis of picture story book classics that are suitable for readers and children of all ages.Ellen Handler Spitz is an effective advocate for the practice of adults reading to children. In this book the author describes how this process engages children in reading as an abiding resource, one that helps to organize and consolidate a powerful transcending force, the mutual, warm, trusting bond of children and their parents."ÑAlbert J. Solnit, M.D., senior research scientist at the Child Study Center and Sterling Professor Emeritus Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Yale University "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read the picture books that have enchanted generations of young children. She shows convincingly how hidden in the familiar stories such as Goodnight Moon, Where the Wild Things Are and many others (which she analyzes in detail) are the anxieties of childhood such as fear of separation and loss or the threat of aggression. Encouraged by the brave and funny characters in the story and soothed by the gentle rise and fall of the parents voice the child falls asleep. These interactions, although brief, often have a lasting influence on the child's imagination and moral development. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child. Essential reading for every parent, teacher and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., author of Second Chances Men, Women and Children a decade after Divorce, Founder Center for the Family in Transition "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read picture books. A truly wondrous look into the complex, passionate inner life of the child that is essential reading for every parent, teacher, and everyone who works with or is interested in helping young children."ÑJudith Wallerstein, Ph.D., founder of the Center for the Family in Transition "This is a splendid addition to the literature about children's booksÑa unique synthesis of key ideas from developmental psychology, from psychoanalytic theory and from literary criticism. Both scholarly and lively, it is to be recommended to psychoanalysts, specialists in children's literature, parents, and all former children. Spitz's postulates are thought provoking and entertaining. They offer fresh insights into old favorites as well as providing an introduction to less well known books, and new ways of approaching all children's picture books."ÑLynn Reiser, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine "Spitz understands just how important it is to think of the picture book as a vehicle for constructing meaning with the child and for developing a relationship between child and adult."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "A work of profound cultural importance, this book addresses the powerful impact of books that shaped our lives early on and that continue to guide us in our adult lives."ÑMaria Tatar, Harvard University "If we really believe 'a picture is worth a thousand words,' and I do, then we all should pay much more attention to picture books and what they print on our memory. This book goes right to the core of the issue."ÑPat Schroeder, president and CEO of the Association of American Publishers and former congresswoman "What a marvelously thought-provoking book! Spitz examines a wide assortment of classic children's picture books that deal with important parenting themes from a psychological viewpoint. . . . The books she examines are children's classics; but, because she is looking at them from a different perspective, the insights she offers on these works, and their authors, are truly refreshing. The ones that I had read, I want to go back and read again. Those that I hadn't read, are ones that I now want to read. . . . In the end one comes away with a new appreciation for both the quality of good picture books and the important role that they play not only in entertaining children, but in providing children and parents guideposts in life's journey."ÑNorman D. Stevens, American Book Collectors of Children's Literature Newsletter "[A] fascinating psycho-social exploration." Ñ Victoria Brownworth, Baltimore Sun "Without jargon or pretension, Spitz celebrates the story and art in [children's] books while discussing their effects in terms of psychology, aesthetics, morality and culture. . . . Even readers who have known about the books forever will find surprising things to think about. Parents and other adults who read aloud to kids, as well as children's literature professionals, will enjoy what Spitz shows about the power of these deceptively simple images and the pleasure of sharing them across generations." ÑBooklist "It was absolutely a pleasure to read this book. . . . Dr. Spitz understands that reading aloud is a relational activity that involves shared experiences between generations. The author does a fantastic job of describing the joy involved in this experience."ÑMeredith Sargent, Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic "Responding to characters and contexts in text and illustrations, Spitz has found a treasure trove of psychological implications in picture books. . . . Concerned parents, and surely devoted grandparents, will find fresh challenges here to help them think more about picture books' inscribed cultural values and, too often, stereotypes. Teachers and librarians will want to analyze Spitz's assumptions and examples. General readers; undergraduate and graduate students; professionals." ÑChoice "As much a call to action as it is an analysis."ÑJennifer K. Ruark, Chronicle of Higher Education "Because of her faith in the imagination, her hesitations, and her excellent taste, Spitz's selection and analysis of books in four picture-book subjectsÑbedtime, loss, anger, self-acceptanceÑare strong and provide a good model for choosing among contemporary offerings."ÑDaria Donnelly, Commonweal "Ellen Handler Spitz probes the complex aesthetic and psychoanalytic affects transmitted by the words and images of children's books. . . . Spitz writes in a clear and engaging fashion, one that is readable even to nonacademics."ÑLinda M. Pavonetti, Journal of Children's Literature "I can think of no better introduction and guide to young children's literature than Inside Picture Books. Drawing from her training in both psychology and art, Ellen Handler Spitz presents a beautifully written treatise on the content and form of successful picture books, and the ways in which these books tap into the imagination of the child. . . . In summary, Inside Picture Books provides a special window of insight into how classic and popular children's books connect with children. It is a book that is intended to teach parents about the complexity of themes that, at first blush, appear to be presented simply. It is a commentary on the power of the shared experience in imagination between parent-reader and child-listener. It is a book to be enjoyed by adults who have grown up enjoying picture books and a tutorial on how to look more deeply into what the child hears and sees. For developmental and behavioral specialists, it provides a new and fascinating slant on the child's use of imagination in the service of grown in understanding."ÑJ. Lane Tanner, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics "There is something fine and rare in Ms. Spitz's book, with its interpretations of picture books ranging from Margaret Wise Brown's 'Goodnight Moon' to Marjorie Flack's 'Story About Ping.' . . . Ms. Spitz speaks to her readers not as an academic but as a practiced read-aloud, knowing the relationship between storyteller and listener."ÑEdward Rothstein, New York Times "[A] sensitive, concentrated study. . . . [Spitz] stresses the pleasure of reading with children, its special intimacies and esthetic satisfactions of rhythm and reverie, sadness and humor. She draws attention to the pedagogical necessities of following child listeners' understanding, of listening to what they ask and feel, and guiding them, and she rejoices in picture books' power to develop 'inner possibilities.' . . . Spitz communicates vividly her pleasure in her material and speaks up vibrantly for the importance, complexity and place of shared reading and picture books in young lives and their future."ÑMarina Warner, New York Times Book Review "With a background in psychology and children's literature, Spitz accessibly explains the significance of bedtime classics such as Goodnight Moon and Bedtime for Frances. . . . Spitz offers interesting observations and anecdotal information on how children project their own experiences and emotions into picture book characters, from mischievous Max in Where the Wild Things Are to the curious protagonist of The Poky Little Puppy. . . . Throughout, too, she conveys her own delight in picture books and the wisdom of sharing books with children."ÑNancy Pate, Orlando Sentinel "What an impressive and rich work! The insight is awesome and I know this book will be able to help parents understand their children so much better than so many of the 'how to' books that are so prevalent on the parent education market. With every page of this book I was compelled to read on, with the feeling I can't wait to share what I'm learning with parents everywhere. If you enjoy reading to your children, I know you will enjoy reading this book."ÑBarbara Burrows, Parenting Magazine "[A] touchingly sensitive and wisdom-filled book. I recommend it wholeheartedly to parents and grandparents, to teachers and writers, to psychoanalysts and other mental health professionals, to all those who are interested in children and how to assisted them in negotiating the mine-laden path of growing up."ÑMartin A. Silverman, Psychoanalytic Quarterly "[A] thought-provoking examination. . . . [Spitz's] book is a must-read for any serious student of children's literature as well as that core group of parents, grandparents, teachers, librarians, and others who are actively engaged in raising children. Provocative, well-written, scholarly without being dry or pedantic, Spitz's text makes a compelling case for the power of art and literature, and the responsibility that accompanies such power, particularly when it relates to children."ÑPublishers Weekly "Through lucid analyses of text and illustrations in beloved children's books, the author provides a thoughtful guide to choosing and using classic books to read aloud with young children. . . . This graceful book is a wonderful resource, full of insights for parents, as well as for child care personnel."ÑAlice Sterling Honig, Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health "[A] brilliant study. . . . [Spitz] organizes her study by the major psychological themes that picture books address--fear of separation (usually first experienced at bedtime, death and loss, disobedience and punishment, and self-acceptance. Along the way, she provides glimpses at the books' larger cultural contexts and her research into children's responses. . . . Inside Picture Books is a rich, multilayered discussion of a powerful art form that is relevant to us all."ÑJohn Hammond, San Antonio Express-News "[Spitz] has assembled for study some of the most mesmerizing and enduring children's books of the last century. . . . Inside Picture Books . . . contains a critically important message, that of p, Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999

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Inside Picture Books. - Spitz, Ellen Handler; Coles, Robert (foreword).
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Inside Picture Books. - hardcover

1999, ISBN: 0300076029

ID: 5182059389

[EAN: 9780300076028], Gebraucht, sehr guter Zustand, [PU: Yale University Pess, New Haven & London], ELLEN HANDLER SPITZ, CHILDREN'S BOOKS, ROBERT COLES, REAING, PARENTS, MAURICE SENDAK, GENDER ISSUES, MOTHERS, AGGRESSION, Jacket, 230 pages. Hardcover with dustjacket in protective mylar cover. Very good condition. CHILDREN'S BOOKS. Mention a name from a beloved childhood picture bookÑMadeline, Corduroy, Peter Rabbit, Max and his "wild things"Ñand most adults can recollect a bright image, fragments of a story, the timbre of a certain reading voice, the sensation of being held, and best of all being together with someone and enveloped in fantasy. Why do picture book images shown to us as young children linger in our minds? How do picture books shape our lives early on and even later into adulthood? This book takes up such questions. It explores the profound impact of the experience of reading to children. Ellen Handler Spitz reveals how classic picture books transmit psychological wisdom, convey moral lessons, shape tastes, and implant subtle prejudices. Each chapter of the book discusses well-known children's booksÑGoodnight Moon, Babar, Little Black Sambo, to name a fewÑthat deal with a theme of importance to young children. These include bedtime, separation, loss, and death; curiosity, disobedience, and punishment; and identity and self-acceptance. Focusing on the relationship between a child and an adult reader, Spitz explains the notion of "conversational reading" and emphasizes the mutual benefits of dialogue and intimacy. This book not only gives parents, grandparents, teachers, therapists, and scholars a new understanding of the meaning of picture books, it also empowers adults to interpret and choose future cultural experiences for their children. Ellen Handler Spitz is a lecturer in the department of art at Stanford University. She writes and lectures widely on the arts, psychology, and culture. She is also the author of Art and Psyche and Museums of the Mind. "This is a book for each and every adult (professionals and parents) who read to children providing a mutually enriching experience for child and adult. Ellen Handler Spitz has transmitted glowingly and in a wonderfully readable manner her deep and broad understanding of how the adult reading to and looking with younger and older children at books written for and artistically created for children and their readers can be a powerful positive force in the lives of children and their readers (parents).In writing this original, scholarly, highly readable book for children's readers, Ellen Handler Spitz has also enlarged our understanding of how children's capacities for pretending, playing and imagining is nurtured and enhanced in the context of a personal relationship with the reader. She demonstrates this with a literary, psychological analysis of picture story book classics that are suitable for readers and children of all ages.Ellen Handler Spitz is an effective advocate for the practice of adults reading to children. In this book the author describes how this process engages children in reading as an abiding resource, one that helps to organize and consolidate a powerful transcending force, the mutual, warm, trusting bond of children and their parents."ÑAlbert J. Solnit, M.D., senior research scientist at the Child Study Center and Sterling Professor Emeritus Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Yale University "A spellbinding work. With remarkable psychological insight and graceful prose the author evokes the intimate dreamlike world created by parent and young child at bedtime when they read the picture books that have enchanted generations of young children. She shows convincingly how hidden in the familiar stories such as Goodnight Moon, Where the Wild Things Are and many others (which she analyzes in detail) are the anxieties of childhood such as fear of separation and loss or the threat of aggression. Encouraged by the brave and funny characters in the story and soothed by the gentle rise and fall of the parents voice the child falls asleep. These interactions, although brief, often have a lasting influence on the child's imagination and moral development. A truly wondrous look into the

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Details of the book
Inside Picture Books
Author:

Spitz, Ellen Handler

Title:

Inside Picture Books

ISBN:

0300076029

Details of the book - Inside Picture Books


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780300076028
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0300076029
Hardcover
Paperback
Publishing year: 1999
Publisher: Yale University Pess, New Haven & London: 1999

Book in our database since 24.10.2007 12:03:41
Book found last time on 07.11.2016 14:51:00
ISBN/EAN: 0300076029

ISBN - alternate spelling:
0-300-07602-9, 978-0-300-07602-8

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